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Thymic stromal lymphopoietin is expressed in the intact central nervous system and upregulated in the myelin-degenerative central nervous system.

Kitic M, Wimmer I, Adzemovic M, Kögl N, Rudel A, Lassmann H, Bradl M - Glia (2014)

Bottom Line: Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is an epithelial cytokine expressed at barrier surfaces of the skin, gut, nose, lung, and the maternal/fetal interphase.At these sites, it is important for the generation and maintenance of non-inflammatory, tissue-resident dendritic cell responses.We show here that TSLP is also expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) where it is produced by choroid plexus epithelial cells and astrocytes in the spinal cord.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical University Vienna, Center for Brain Research, Department of Neuroimmunology, Spitalgasse 4, 1090, Vienna, Austria.

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The phenotype of microglia isolated from PLP-transgenic rats. Shown here are log2-fold changes in the expression of TSLP-instructed transcripts in microglia isolated from PLP-transgenic animals, as compared with their wildtype derived counterparts. Note the upregulation of the microglial activation marker CD68, of MHC class II molecules (as an example, RT1-Bb is shown), of the costimulatory molecule CD86, of CD40 and Ox40 ligand, and the clear downregulation of IL-12b and of CCL17 in PLP-transgenic microglia in comparison to its wildtype counterpart. The microglial cells tested derived from seven wildtype and eight PLP-transgenic rats.
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fig05: The phenotype of microglia isolated from PLP-transgenic rats. Shown here are log2-fold changes in the expression of TSLP-instructed transcripts in microglia isolated from PLP-transgenic animals, as compared with their wildtype derived counterparts. Note the upregulation of the microglial activation marker CD68, of MHC class II molecules (as an example, RT1-Bb is shown), of the costimulatory molecule CD86, of CD40 and Ox40 ligand, and the clear downregulation of IL-12b and of CCL17 in PLP-transgenic microglia in comparison to its wildtype counterpart. The microglial cells tested derived from seven wildtype and eight PLP-transgenic rats.

Mentions: We could not detect the expression of functional TSLP receptor dimers by immunohistochemistry, probably due to expression levels below the limit of detection. Therefore, we used a different approach to study the effect of TSLP on microglia in the myelin-degenerative CNS. We isolated microglia from the spinal cords of PLP-transgenic rats and their wildtype Lewis counterparts and studied the expression of genes known to be affected by TSLP, that is, MHC class II products, the costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86, OX40L, CCL17, and CCL22 (Zhou et al., 2005). Compared with their wildtype Lewis rat-derived counterparts, microglia isolated from the spinal cord of PLP-transgenic rats upregulated MHC class II products, showed enhanced expression of the costimulatory molecules CD40 and CD86 but not of CD80, and transcribed more OX40L products. mRNA coding for CCL22 and CCL17 was either unchanged or downregulated, respectively (Fig. 5). Hence, microglial cells revealed some, but not all features of TSLP-instructed cells.


Thymic stromal lymphopoietin is expressed in the intact central nervous system and upregulated in the myelin-degenerative central nervous system.

Kitic M, Wimmer I, Adzemovic M, Kögl N, Rudel A, Lassmann H, Bradl M - Glia (2014)

The phenotype of microglia isolated from PLP-transgenic rats. Shown here are log2-fold changes in the expression of TSLP-instructed transcripts in microglia isolated from PLP-transgenic animals, as compared with their wildtype derived counterparts. Note the upregulation of the microglial activation marker CD68, of MHC class II molecules (as an example, RT1-Bb is shown), of the costimulatory molecule CD86, of CD40 and Ox40 ligand, and the clear downregulation of IL-12b and of CCL17 in PLP-transgenic microglia in comparison to its wildtype counterpart. The microglial cells tested derived from seven wildtype and eight PLP-transgenic rats.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4237118&req=5

fig05: The phenotype of microglia isolated from PLP-transgenic rats. Shown here are log2-fold changes in the expression of TSLP-instructed transcripts in microglia isolated from PLP-transgenic animals, as compared with their wildtype derived counterparts. Note the upregulation of the microglial activation marker CD68, of MHC class II molecules (as an example, RT1-Bb is shown), of the costimulatory molecule CD86, of CD40 and Ox40 ligand, and the clear downregulation of IL-12b and of CCL17 in PLP-transgenic microglia in comparison to its wildtype counterpart. The microglial cells tested derived from seven wildtype and eight PLP-transgenic rats.
Mentions: We could not detect the expression of functional TSLP receptor dimers by immunohistochemistry, probably due to expression levels below the limit of detection. Therefore, we used a different approach to study the effect of TSLP on microglia in the myelin-degenerative CNS. We isolated microglia from the spinal cords of PLP-transgenic rats and their wildtype Lewis counterparts and studied the expression of genes known to be affected by TSLP, that is, MHC class II products, the costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86, OX40L, CCL17, and CCL22 (Zhou et al., 2005). Compared with their wildtype Lewis rat-derived counterparts, microglia isolated from the spinal cord of PLP-transgenic rats upregulated MHC class II products, showed enhanced expression of the costimulatory molecules CD40 and CD86 but not of CD80, and transcribed more OX40L products. mRNA coding for CCL22 and CCL17 was either unchanged or downregulated, respectively (Fig. 5). Hence, microglial cells revealed some, but not all features of TSLP-instructed cells.

Bottom Line: Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is an epithelial cytokine expressed at barrier surfaces of the skin, gut, nose, lung, and the maternal/fetal interphase.At these sites, it is important for the generation and maintenance of non-inflammatory, tissue-resident dendritic cell responses.We show here that TSLP is also expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) where it is produced by choroid plexus epithelial cells and astrocytes in the spinal cord.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical University Vienna, Center for Brain Research, Department of Neuroimmunology, Spitalgasse 4, 1090, Vienna, Austria.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus