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Are there benefits of social overinclusion? Behavioral and ERP effects in the Cyberball paradigm.

Niedeggen M, Sarauli N, Cacciola S, Weschke S - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: In this experiment, we examined whether overinclusion of participants enhances the satisfaction of social needs, reduces the P3 amplitude correspondingly, and affects central reward processing.As predicted, overinclusion increased the satisfaction of social needs, with exception of "self esteem", and reduced the P3 amplitude.In contrast, appraisal of social rewards does not depend on the probability of involvement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Educational Science and Psychology, Experimental Psychology and Neuropsychology, Freie Universität Berlin Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Social participation can be examined using the Cyberball paradigm, a virtual ball-tossing game. Reducing the involvement of the participant is supposed to activate a neural alarm system, and to threaten fundamental social needs. Our previous findings indicate that the latter process can be linked to an enhancement of the centro-parietal P3 amplitude, signaling a modulation of the subjective expectancy of involvement. A preceding more frontal ERP component, the P2, does not depend of the probability of involvement, but reflects the appraisal of social reward. In this experiment, we examined whether overinclusion of participants enhances the satisfaction of social needs, reduces the P3 amplitude correspondingly, and affects central reward processing. In the control condition, participants (n = 40) were included (two co-player, ball possession 33%), and overincluded (ball possession 46%) in the experimental condition. In a counterbalanced design, we also controlled for the order of conditions. As predicted, overinclusion increased the satisfaction of social needs, with exception of "self esteem", and reduced the P3 amplitude. As for the frontal P2, overinclusion only enhanced the amplitudes if the less frequent involvement (condition: inclusion) was experienced previously. The behavioral and P3 data suggest that the feelings of social belonging, meaningful existence, and control are related to the subjective expectancy of social involvement, and can be described in terms of a linear continuum ranging from exclusion to overinclusion. In contrast, appraisal of social rewards does not depend on the probability of involvement.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Grand-averaged ERPs for the event “ball possession of the participant” separated for the two experimental groups (order of condition: “INC first” vs. “OI first”). Electrodes are pooled to the clusters “frontal” and “parietal”. Two experimental conditions related to different probabilities of ball possession are superimposed (INC: inclusion, 33%; OI: overinclusion, 46%). Amplitude differences between the conditions were observed in two time windows, 150–210 ms (P2, see frontal leads) and 320–400 ms (P3, see parietal leads). (B) Mean ERP amplitudes of the two components separated for the effect of experimental condition “probability” (inclusion vs. overinclusion) and “order of conditions” (inclusion first vs. overinclusion first). Bars indicate the standard error of mean.
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Figure 2: (A) Grand-averaged ERPs for the event “ball possession of the participant” separated for the two experimental groups (order of condition: “INC first” vs. “OI first”). Electrodes are pooled to the clusters “frontal” and “parietal”. Two experimental conditions related to different probabilities of ball possession are superimposed (INC: inclusion, 33%; OI: overinclusion, 46%). Amplitude differences between the conditions were observed in two time windows, 150–210 ms (P2, see frontal leads) and 320–400 ms (P3, see parietal leads). (B) Mean ERP amplitudes of the two components separated for the effect of experimental condition “probability” (inclusion vs. overinclusion) and “order of conditions” (inclusion first vs. overinclusion first). Bars indicate the standard error of mean.

Mentions: The grand-averaged ERPs evoked by the event “ball possession” are depicted in Figure 2. Three time ranges were exported for further analyses: The N2 range (130–180 ms) was marked by a parietal negative peak at about 170 ms, and released by a marked frontal positivity mostly expressed in the condition “overinclusion” (P2, 150–210 ms). Replicating our previous findings (Gutz et al., 2011; Weschke and Niedeggen, 2013), ball reception triggered a late positive complex with a centro-parietal maximum extending from 320–400 ms (P3). The following analysis was focused on the P2 and P3. In line with our previous results, no effect on the N2 amplitude was induced by modulating the probability of ball reception.


Are there benefits of social overinclusion? Behavioral and ERP effects in the Cyberball paradigm.

Niedeggen M, Sarauli N, Cacciola S, Weschke S - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

(A) Grand-averaged ERPs for the event “ball possession of the participant” separated for the two experimental groups (order of condition: “INC first” vs. “OI first”). Electrodes are pooled to the clusters “frontal” and “parietal”. Two experimental conditions related to different probabilities of ball possession are superimposed (INC: inclusion, 33%; OI: overinclusion, 46%). Amplitude differences between the conditions were observed in two time windows, 150–210 ms (P2, see frontal leads) and 320–400 ms (P3, see parietal leads). (B) Mean ERP amplitudes of the two components separated for the effect of experimental condition “probability” (inclusion vs. overinclusion) and “order of conditions” (inclusion first vs. overinclusion first). Bars indicate the standard error of mean.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4237054&req=5

Figure 2: (A) Grand-averaged ERPs for the event “ball possession of the participant” separated for the two experimental groups (order of condition: “INC first” vs. “OI first”). Electrodes are pooled to the clusters “frontal” and “parietal”. Two experimental conditions related to different probabilities of ball possession are superimposed (INC: inclusion, 33%; OI: overinclusion, 46%). Amplitude differences between the conditions were observed in two time windows, 150–210 ms (P2, see frontal leads) and 320–400 ms (P3, see parietal leads). (B) Mean ERP amplitudes of the two components separated for the effect of experimental condition “probability” (inclusion vs. overinclusion) and “order of conditions” (inclusion first vs. overinclusion first). Bars indicate the standard error of mean.
Mentions: The grand-averaged ERPs evoked by the event “ball possession” are depicted in Figure 2. Three time ranges were exported for further analyses: The N2 range (130–180 ms) was marked by a parietal negative peak at about 170 ms, and released by a marked frontal positivity mostly expressed in the condition “overinclusion” (P2, 150–210 ms). Replicating our previous findings (Gutz et al., 2011; Weschke and Niedeggen, 2013), ball reception triggered a late positive complex with a centro-parietal maximum extending from 320–400 ms (P3). The following analysis was focused on the P2 and P3. In line with our previous results, no effect on the N2 amplitude was induced by modulating the probability of ball reception.

Bottom Line: In this experiment, we examined whether overinclusion of participants enhances the satisfaction of social needs, reduces the P3 amplitude correspondingly, and affects central reward processing.As predicted, overinclusion increased the satisfaction of social needs, with exception of "self esteem", and reduced the P3 amplitude.In contrast, appraisal of social rewards does not depend on the probability of involvement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Educational Science and Psychology, Experimental Psychology and Neuropsychology, Freie Universität Berlin Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Social participation can be examined using the Cyberball paradigm, a virtual ball-tossing game. Reducing the involvement of the participant is supposed to activate a neural alarm system, and to threaten fundamental social needs. Our previous findings indicate that the latter process can be linked to an enhancement of the centro-parietal P3 amplitude, signaling a modulation of the subjective expectancy of involvement. A preceding more frontal ERP component, the P2, does not depend of the probability of involvement, but reflects the appraisal of social reward. In this experiment, we examined whether overinclusion of participants enhances the satisfaction of social needs, reduces the P3 amplitude correspondingly, and affects central reward processing. In the control condition, participants (n = 40) were included (two co-player, ball possession 33%), and overincluded (ball possession 46%) in the experimental condition. In a counterbalanced design, we also controlled for the order of conditions. As predicted, overinclusion increased the satisfaction of social needs, with exception of "self esteem", and reduced the P3 amplitude. As for the frontal P2, overinclusion only enhanced the amplitudes if the less frequent involvement (condition: inclusion) was experienced previously. The behavioral and P3 data suggest that the feelings of social belonging, meaningful existence, and control are related to the subjective expectancy of social involvement, and can be described in terms of a linear continuum ranging from exclusion to overinclusion. In contrast, appraisal of social rewards does not depend on the probability of involvement.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus