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What Parents Think about Giving Nonnutritive Sweeteners to Their Children: A Pilot Study.

Sylvetsky AC, Greenberg M, Zhao X, Rother KI - Int J Pediatr (2014)

Bottom Line: Most parents (72%) disagreed with the statement "NNS are safe for my child to consume." This was not reflected during the shopping simulation activity because about one-quarter of items selected by parents contained NNS.Conclusions.The negative parental attitudes toward providing NNS to their children raise the question whether parents are willing to replace added sugars with NNS in an effort to reduce their child's calorie intake.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section on Pediatric Diabetes & Metabolism, NIDDK, NIH, 9000 Rockville Pike, Building 10, Room 8C432A, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA ; Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, The George Washington University, 950 New Hampshire Avenue NW, Room 204, Washington, DC 20052, USA.

ABSTRACT
Objective. To evaluate parental attitudes toward providing foods and beverages with nonnutritive sweeteners (NNS) to their children and to explore parental ability to recognize NNS in packaged foods and beverages. Methods. 120 parents of children ≥ 1 and ≤18 years of age completed brief questionnaires upon entering or exiting a grocery store. Parental attitudes toward NNS were assessed using an interviewer-assisted survey. Parental selection of packaged food and beverages (with and without NNS) was evaluated during a shopping simulation activity. Parental ability to identify products with NNS was tested with a NNS recognition test. Results. Most parents (72%) disagreed with the statement "NNS are safe for my child to consume." This was not reflected during the shopping simulation activity because about one-quarter of items selected by parents contained NNS. Parents correctly identified only 23% of NNS-containing items presented as foods or beverages which were sweetened with NNS. Conclusions. The negative parental attitudes toward providing NNS to their children raise the question whether parents are willing to replace added sugars with NNS in an effort to reduce their child's calorie intake. Our findings also suggest that food labeling should be revised in order for consumers to more easily identify NNS in foods and beverages.

No MeSH data available.


Parental ability to recognize foods and beverages (n = 44) containing nonnutritive sweeteners. Recognition of NNS varied based on the type of food and beverage presented (P = 0.02). Participants generally recognized NNS with higher frequency in beverages, condiments, desserts, and yogurts, while NNS in grains, canned goods, and other foods were more frequently overlooked. Each black dot corresponds to individual food or beverage items within each category.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Parental ability to recognize foods and beverages (n = 44) containing nonnutritive sweeteners. Recognition of NNS varied based on the type of food and beverage presented (P = 0.02). Participants generally recognized NNS with higher frequency in beverages, condiments, desserts, and yogurts, while NNS in grains, canned goods, and other foods were more frequently overlooked. Each black dot corresponds to individual food or beverage items within each category.

Mentions: The mean NNS-recognition score was 23 ± 14%. As shown in Figure 1, recognition of NNS depended on the type of food and beverage presented (P = 0.02). Participants generally recognized NNS with higher frequency in beverages, condiments, desserts, and yogurts while NNS in grains, canned goods, and other foods were more frequently overlooked. NNS recognition was inversely associated with BMI (P < 0.002).


What Parents Think about Giving Nonnutritive Sweeteners to Their Children: A Pilot Study.

Sylvetsky AC, Greenberg M, Zhao X, Rother KI - Int J Pediatr (2014)

Parental ability to recognize foods and beverages (n = 44) containing nonnutritive sweeteners. Recognition of NNS varied based on the type of food and beverage presented (P = 0.02). Participants generally recognized NNS with higher frequency in beverages, condiments, desserts, and yogurts, while NNS in grains, canned goods, and other foods were more frequently overlooked. Each black dot corresponds to individual food or beverage items within each category.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4236964&req=5

fig1: Parental ability to recognize foods and beverages (n = 44) containing nonnutritive sweeteners. Recognition of NNS varied based on the type of food and beverage presented (P = 0.02). Participants generally recognized NNS with higher frequency in beverages, condiments, desserts, and yogurts, while NNS in grains, canned goods, and other foods were more frequently overlooked. Each black dot corresponds to individual food or beverage items within each category.
Mentions: The mean NNS-recognition score was 23 ± 14%. As shown in Figure 1, recognition of NNS depended on the type of food and beverage presented (P = 0.02). Participants generally recognized NNS with higher frequency in beverages, condiments, desserts, and yogurts while NNS in grains, canned goods, and other foods were more frequently overlooked. NNS recognition was inversely associated with BMI (P < 0.002).

Bottom Line: Most parents (72%) disagreed with the statement "NNS are safe for my child to consume." This was not reflected during the shopping simulation activity because about one-quarter of items selected by parents contained NNS.Conclusions.The negative parental attitudes toward providing NNS to their children raise the question whether parents are willing to replace added sugars with NNS in an effort to reduce their child's calorie intake.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section on Pediatric Diabetes & Metabolism, NIDDK, NIH, 9000 Rockville Pike, Building 10, Room 8C432A, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA ; Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, The George Washington University, 950 New Hampshire Avenue NW, Room 204, Washington, DC 20052, USA.

ABSTRACT
Objective. To evaluate parental attitudes toward providing foods and beverages with nonnutritive sweeteners (NNS) to their children and to explore parental ability to recognize NNS in packaged foods and beverages. Methods. 120 parents of children ≥ 1 and ≤18 years of age completed brief questionnaires upon entering or exiting a grocery store. Parental attitudes toward NNS were assessed using an interviewer-assisted survey. Parental selection of packaged food and beverages (with and without NNS) was evaluated during a shopping simulation activity. Parental ability to identify products with NNS was tested with a NNS recognition test. Results. Most parents (72%) disagreed with the statement "NNS are safe for my child to consume." This was not reflected during the shopping simulation activity because about one-quarter of items selected by parents contained NNS. Parents correctly identified only 23% of NNS-containing items presented as foods or beverages which were sweetened with NNS. Conclusions. The negative parental attitudes toward providing NNS to their children raise the question whether parents are willing to replace added sugars with NNS in an effort to reduce their child's calorie intake. Our findings also suggest that food labeling should be revised in order for consumers to more easily identify NNS in foods and beverages.

No MeSH data available.