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Risk of Type 2 Diabetes among Osteoarthritis Patients in a Prospective Longitudinal Study.

Rahman MM, Cibere J, Anis AH, Goldsmith CH, Kopec JA - Int J Rheumatol (2014)

Bottom Line: Poisson regression and Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to estimate the effects after adjusting for available sociodemographic and medical factors.Results.Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to elucidate the potential mechanisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3 ; Department of Applied Statistics, East West University, Aftabnagar, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh.

ABSTRACT
Objectives. Our aim was to determine the risk of diabetes among osteoarthritis (OA) cases in a prospective longitudinal study. Methods. Administrative health records of 577,601 randomly selected individuals from British Columbia, Canada, from 1991 to 2009, were analyzed. OA and diabetes cases were identified by checking physician's visits and hospital records. From 1991 to 1996 we documented 19,143 existing OA cases and selected one non-OA individual matched by age, sex, and year of administrative records. Poisson regression and Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to estimate the effects after adjusting for available sociodemographic and medical factors. Results. At baseline, the mean age of OA cases was 61 years and 60.5% were women. Over 12 years of mean follow-up, the incidence rate (95% CI) of diabetes was 11.2 (10.90-11.50) per 1000 person years. Adjusted RRs (95% CI) for diabetes were 1.27 (1.15-1.41), 1.21 (1.08-1.35), 1.16 (1.04-1.28), and 0.99 (0.86-1.14) for younger women (age 20-64 years), older women (age ≥ 65 years), younger men, and older men, respectively. Conclusion. Younger adults and older women with OA have increased risks of developing diabetes compared to their age-sex matched non-OA counterparts. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to elucidate the potential mechanisms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Adjusted relative risk (RR) and the 95% confidence interval (CI) of diabetes according to the severity of osteoarthritis. Box-plots with solid line represent cases of age 20–64 years and dash line represents cases of age 65 years and over. RRs were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, socioeconomic status, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and Charlson index.
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fig1: Adjusted relative risk (RR) and the 95% confidence interval (CI) of diabetes according to the severity of osteoarthritis. Box-plots with solid line represent cases of age 20–64 years and dash line represents cases of age 65 years and over. RRs were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, socioeconomic status, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and Charlson index.

Mentions: To check whether a dose-response relationship with disease severity exists among younger and older OA cases, we ran multivariable PH and Poisson regressions using OA diagnosis, surgical consultation, and TJR as exposure (Figure 1). Among OA cases, 1,811 (9.5%) had at least one TJR or revision and 3,080 (16%) had visits to orthopaedic surgeons before the baseline. Adjusted RR of diabetes was higher in the TJR group among younger OA cases (RRs (95% CI) were 1.22 (1.15–1.30), 1.15 (1.03–1.30), and 1.37 (1.14–1.63) for OA diagnosis, surgical consultation, and TJR groups, resp.). Among older OA cases (age 65 years and more) surgical consultation group showed the highest risk of diabetes (RRs (95% CI) were 1.13 (1.05–1.23), 1.30 (1.13–1.49), and 1.12 (0.96–1.31) for OA diagnosis, surgical consultation, and TJR groups, resp.).


Risk of Type 2 Diabetes among Osteoarthritis Patients in a Prospective Longitudinal Study.

Rahman MM, Cibere J, Anis AH, Goldsmith CH, Kopec JA - Int J Rheumatol (2014)

Adjusted relative risk (RR) and the 95% confidence interval (CI) of diabetes according to the severity of osteoarthritis. Box-plots with solid line represent cases of age 20–64 years and dash line represents cases of age 65 years and over. RRs were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, socioeconomic status, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and Charlson index.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4236891&req=5

fig1: Adjusted relative risk (RR) and the 95% confidence interval (CI) of diabetes according to the severity of osteoarthritis. Box-plots with solid line represent cases of age 20–64 years and dash line represents cases of age 65 years and over. RRs were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, socioeconomic status, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and Charlson index.
Mentions: To check whether a dose-response relationship with disease severity exists among younger and older OA cases, we ran multivariable PH and Poisson regressions using OA diagnosis, surgical consultation, and TJR as exposure (Figure 1). Among OA cases, 1,811 (9.5%) had at least one TJR or revision and 3,080 (16%) had visits to orthopaedic surgeons before the baseline. Adjusted RR of diabetes was higher in the TJR group among younger OA cases (RRs (95% CI) were 1.22 (1.15–1.30), 1.15 (1.03–1.30), and 1.37 (1.14–1.63) for OA diagnosis, surgical consultation, and TJR groups, resp.). Among older OA cases (age 65 years and more) surgical consultation group showed the highest risk of diabetes (RRs (95% CI) were 1.13 (1.05–1.23), 1.30 (1.13–1.49), and 1.12 (0.96–1.31) for OA diagnosis, surgical consultation, and TJR groups, resp.).

Bottom Line: Poisson regression and Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to estimate the effects after adjusting for available sociodemographic and medical factors.Results.Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to elucidate the potential mechanisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3 ; Department of Applied Statistics, East West University, Aftabnagar, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh.

ABSTRACT
Objectives. Our aim was to determine the risk of diabetes among osteoarthritis (OA) cases in a prospective longitudinal study. Methods. Administrative health records of 577,601 randomly selected individuals from British Columbia, Canada, from 1991 to 2009, were analyzed. OA and diabetes cases were identified by checking physician's visits and hospital records. From 1991 to 1996 we documented 19,143 existing OA cases and selected one non-OA individual matched by age, sex, and year of administrative records. Poisson regression and Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to estimate the effects after adjusting for available sociodemographic and medical factors. Results. At baseline, the mean age of OA cases was 61 years and 60.5% were women. Over 12 years of mean follow-up, the incidence rate (95% CI) of diabetes was 11.2 (10.90-11.50) per 1000 person years. Adjusted RRs (95% CI) for diabetes were 1.27 (1.15-1.41), 1.21 (1.08-1.35), 1.16 (1.04-1.28), and 0.99 (0.86-1.14) for younger women (age 20-64 years), older women (age ≥ 65 years), younger men, and older men, respectively. Conclusion. Younger adults and older women with OA have increased risks of developing diabetes compared to their age-sex matched non-OA counterparts. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to elucidate the potential mechanisms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus