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Effects of millimeter wave irradiation and equivalent thermal heating on the activity of individual neurons in the leech ganglion.

Romanenko S, Siegel PH, Wagenaar DA, Pikov V - J. Neurophysiol. (2014)

Bottom Line: Many of today's radiofrequency-emitting devices in telecommunication, telemedicine, transportation safety, and security/military applications use the millimeter wave (MMW) band (30-300 GHz).For comparison, the recognized U.S. safe exposure limit is 1 mW/cm(2) for 6 min.During the exposure to MMWs and gradual bath heating at a rate of 0.04°C/s (2.4°C/min), the ganglionic neurons exhibited similar dose-dependent hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane and decrease in the action potential amplitude.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California; Neural Engineering Program, Huntington Medical Research Institutes, Pasadena, California; and.

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Time course of changes in the firing rate (Δfiring rate) during 60-s application of MMW irradiation at IPDs ranging from 1 to 8 mW/cm2. Calculation of the firing rate was based on the interspike intervals averaged for every 10 s. The shaded red area indicates the interval of MMW irradiation. Data are means ± SE.
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Figure 4: Time course of changes in the firing rate (Δfiring rate) during 60-s application of MMW irradiation at IPDs ranging from 1 to 8 mW/cm2. Calculation of the firing rate was based on the interspike intervals averaged for every 10 s. The shaded red area indicates the interval of MMW irradiation. Data are means ± SE.

Mentions: The effect of MMW irradiation on the temporal pattern of changes in the firing rate was examined at three IPD levels (Fig. 4). At the lowest power level of 1 mW/cm2, the firing rate continued to decrease throughout the 60-s duration of MMW exposure, whereas at 2 and 4 mW/cm2, the decrease was transient and the firing rate began to return back to the baseline value at 25 to 35 s after the initiation of MMW exposure. At 4 mW/cm2, some increase in the firing rate was observed 50 s after the termination of MMW exposure.


Effects of millimeter wave irradiation and equivalent thermal heating on the activity of individual neurons in the leech ganglion.

Romanenko S, Siegel PH, Wagenaar DA, Pikov V - J. Neurophysiol. (2014)

Time course of changes in the firing rate (Δfiring rate) during 60-s application of MMW irradiation at IPDs ranging from 1 to 8 mW/cm2. Calculation of the firing rate was based on the interspike intervals averaged for every 10 s. The shaded red area indicates the interval of MMW irradiation. Data are means ± SE.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4233276&req=5

Figure 4: Time course of changes in the firing rate (Δfiring rate) during 60-s application of MMW irradiation at IPDs ranging from 1 to 8 mW/cm2. Calculation of the firing rate was based on the interspike intervals averaged for every 10 s. The shaded red area indicates the interval of MMW irradiation. Data are means ± SE.
Mentions: The effect of MMW irradiation on the temporal pattern of changes in the firing rate was examined at three IPD levels (Fig. 4). At the lowest power level of 1 mW/cm2, the firing rate continued to decrease throughout the 60-s duration of MMW exposure, whereas at 2 and 4 mW/cm2, the decrease was transient and the firing rate began to return back to the baseline value at 25 to 35 s after the initiation of MMW exposure. At 4 mW/cm2, some increase in the firing rate was observed 50 s after the termination of MMW exposure.

Bottom Line: Many of today's radiofrequency-emitting devices in telecommunication, telemedicine, transportation safety, and security/military applications use the millimeter wave (MMW) band (30-300 GHz).For comparison, the recognized U.S. safe exposure limit is 1 mW/cm(2) for 6 min.During the exposure to MMWs and gradual bath heating at a rate of 0.04°C/s (2.4°C/min), the ganglionic neurons exhibited similar dose-dependent hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane and decrease in the action potential amplitude.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California; Neural Engineering Program, Huntington Medical Research Institutes, Pasadena, California; and.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus