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Myositis ossificans traumatica causing ankylosis of the elbow.

Kanthimathi B, Udhaya Shankar S, Arun Kumar K, Narayanan VL - Clin Orthop Surg (2014)

Bottom Line: Histopathology revealed lamellar bone.The 2-year follow-up showed full function of the affected limb and no signs of recurrence.We report this case of clinical interest due to the unusually large myositic mass.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Orthopaedics, Rajah Muthiah Medical College, Annamalai University, Chidambaram, India.

ABSTRACT
Myositis ossificans traumatica is an unusual complication following a muscle contusion injury. A significantly large myositic mass causing ankylosis of the elbow is even rarer. We report a 13-year-old boy who presented with a 14-month history of a fixed elbow with no movement and a palpable bony mass in the anterior aspect of the elbow. He had sustained significant trauma to the affected limb 1 month prior to onset of symptoms, which was managed by native massage and bandaging for 4 weeks. The clinicoradiological diagnosis was suggestive of myositis ossificans, and the myositic mass was completely excised. Histopathology revealed lamellar bone. The 2-year follow-up showed full function of the affected limb and no signs of recurrence. We report this case of clinical interest due to the unusually large myositic mass.

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Excised myositic mass.
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Figure 3: Excised myositic mass.

Mentions: The mass was excised completely after detaching it from the humerus and ulna (Fig. 3). The elbow was mobilized intraoperatively, and full range resumed. The excised specimen was sent for histopathological examination and revealed lamellar bone both peripherally and centrally. The child developed neuropraxia of the median nerve postoperatively, which recovered within 2 weeks. Postoperative radiographs showed no trace of the myositic mass (Fig. 4). Elbow range of motion exercises were started by the middle of the first week, as tolerated. Active flexion of 30° to 90° was possible during the initial postoperative period. The patient was reviewed every 2 weeks for the first 2 months and once monthly for up to 6 months to assess functional status.


Myositis ossificans traumatica causing ankylosis of the elbow.

Kanthimathi B, Udhaya Shankar S, Arun Kumar K, Narayanan VL - Clin Orthop Surg (2014)

Excised myositic mass.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4233230&req=5

Figure 3: Excised myositic mass.
Mentions: The mass was excised completely after detaching it from the humerus and ulna (Fig. 3). The elbow was mobilized intraoperatively, and full range resumed. The excised specimen was sent for histopathological examination and revealed lamellar bone both peripherally and centrally. The child developed neuropraxia of the median nerve postoperatively, which recovered within 2 weeks. Postoperative radiographs showed no trace of the myositic mass (Fig. 4). Elbow range of motion exercises were started by the middle of the first week, as tolerated. Active flexion of 30° to 90° was possible during the initial postoperative period. The patient was reviewed every 2 weeks for the first 2 months and once monthly for up to 6 months to assess functional status.

Bottom Line: Histopathology revealed lamellar bone.The 2-year follow-up showed full function of the affected limb and no signs of recurrence.We report this case of clinical interest due to the unusually large myositic mass.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Orthopaedics, Rajah Muthiah Medical College, Annamalai University, Chidambaram, India.

ABSTRACT
Myositis ossificans traumatica is an unusual complication following a muscle contusion injury. A significantly large myositic mass causing ankylosis of the elbow is even rarer. We report a 13-year-old boy who presented with a 14-month history of a fixed elbow with no movement and a palpable bony mass in the anterior aspect of the elbow. He had sustained significant trauma to the affected limb 1 month prior to onset of symptoms, which was managed by native massage and bandaging for 4 weeks. The clinicoradiological diagnosis was suggestive of myositis ossificans, and the myositic mass was completely excised. Histopathology revealed lamellar bone. The 2-year follow-up showed full function of the affected limb and no signs of recurrence. We report this case of clinical interest due to the unusually large myositic mass.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus