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Robotic and navigation systems in orthopaedic surgery: how much do our patients understand?

Jassim SS, Benjamin-Laing H, Douglas SL, Haddad FS - Clin Orthop Surg (2014)

Bottom Line: Although patients are aware of benefits of conventional joint replacement, little is known on patients' knowledge of the prevalence, benefits or drawbacks of surgery involving navigation or robotic systems.Amongst perceived benefits of navigation/robotic surgery was more accurate surgery (47%), quicker surgery (50%), and making the surgeon's job easier (52%).Sixty-nine percent believed navigation/robotics was more expensive and 20% believed it held no benefit against conventional surgery, with only 9% believing it led to longer surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, University College London Hospital, London, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Technology in orthopaedic surgery has become more widespread in the past 20 years, with emerging evidence of its benefits in arthroplasty. Although patients are aware of benefits of conventional joint replacement, little is known on patients' knowledge of the prevalence, benefits or drawbacks of surgery involving navigation or robotic systems.

Methods: In an outpatient arthroplasty clinic, 100 consecutive patients were approached and given questionnaires to assess their knowledge of navigation and robotics in orthopaedic surgery. Participation in the survey was voluntary.

Results: Ninety-eight patients volunteered to participate in the survey, mean age 56.2 years (range, 19 to 88 years; 52 female, 46 male). Forty percent of patients thought more than 30% of National Health Service (NHS) orthopaedic operations involved navigation or robotics; 80% believed this was the same level or less than the private sector. One-third believed most of an operation could be performed independently by a robotic/navigation system. Amongst perceived benefits of navigation/robotic surgery was more accurate surgery (47%), quicker surgery (50%), and making the surgeon's job easier (52%). Sixty-nine percent believed navigation/robotics was more expensive and 20% believed it held no benefit against conventional surgery, with only 9% believing it led to longer surgery. Almost 50% would not mind at least some of their operation being performed with use of robotics/navigation.

Conclusions: Although few patients were familiar with this new technology, there appeared to be a strong consensus it was quicker and more accurate than conventional surgery. Many patients appear to believe navigation and robotics in orthopaedic surgery is largely the preserve of the private sector. This study demonstrates public knowledge of such new technologies is limited and a need to inform patients of the relative merits and drawbacks of such surgery prior to their more widespread implementation.

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Bar chart of Question 4 responses: What sort of benefits do you think robots and navigation may have for surgery (compared to conventional surgery)? At least 50% of responders believed that surgery involving robotics and navigation was quicker and easier for the surgeon compared to conventional surgery. Forty-seven percent believed it was more accurate and 30% believed it has fewer complications compared to conventional surgery.
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Figure 4: Bar chart of Question 4 responses: What sort of benefits do you think robots and navigation may have for surgery (compared to conventional surgery)? At least 50% of responders believed that surgery involving robotics and navigation was quicker and easier for the surgeon compared to conventional surgery. Forty-seven percent believed it was more accurate and 30% believed it has fewer complications compared to conventional surgery.

Mentions: At least one-third of patients believed that most or all of an operation could be independently performed by a RN system (Fig. 1). Three quarters of patients believed that at least 10% of orthopaedic operations in the National Health Service (NHS) currently used RN systems (Fig. 2). Over 80% believed that this was the same level or less when compared to orthopaedic RN surgery in private practice (Fig. 3). Approximately half of all patients perceived RN surgery to be more accurate, easier for the surgeon and quicker in comparison to conventional surgery (Fig. 4). Approximately 70% of patients recognised that RN surgery was more expensive than conventional surgery and approximately 20% did not believe that it held more benefit than conventional surgery (Fig. 5). Finally, almost 50% of patients wouldn't mind at least some of their surgery performed with the use of RN systems with less than 20% preferring to have none at all involving a RN system (Fig. 6).


Robotic and navigation systems in orthopaedic surgery: how much do our patients understand?

Jassim SS, Benjamin-Laing H, Douglas SL, Haddad FS - Clin Orthop Surg (2014)

Bar chart of Question 4 responses: What sort of benefits do you think robots and navigation may have for surgery (compared to conventional surgery)? At least 50% of responders believed that surgery involving robotics and navigation was quicker and easier for the surgeon compared to conventional surgery. Forty-seven percent believed it was more accurate and 30% believed it has fewer complications compared to conventional surgery.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4233227&req=5

Figure 4: Bar chart of Question 4 responses: What sort of benefits do you think robots and navigation may have for surgery (compared to conventional surgery)? At least 50% of responders believed that surgery involving robotics and navigation was quicker and easier for the surgeon compared to conventional surgery. Forty-seven percent believed it was more accurate and 30% believed it has fewer complications compared to conventional surgery.
Mentions: At least one-third of patients believed that most or all of an operation could be independently performed by a RN system (Fig. 1). Three quarters of patients believed that at least 10% of orthopaedic operations in the National Health Service (NHS) currently used RN systems (Fig. 2). Over 80% believed that this was the same level or less when compared to orthopaedic RN surgery in private practice (Fig. 3). Approximately half of all patients perceived RN surgery to be more accurate, easier for the surgeon and quicker in comparison to conventional surgery (Fig. 4). Approximately 70% of patients recognised that RN surgery was more expensive than conventional surgery and approximately 20% did not believe that it held more benefit than conventional surgery (Fig. 5). Finally, almost 50% of patients wouldn't mind at least some of their surgery performed with the use of RN systems with less than 20% preferring to have none at all involving a RN system (Fig. 6).

Bottom Line: Although patients are aware of benefits of conventional joint replacement, little is known on patients' knowledge of the prevalence, benefits or drawbacks of surgery involving navigation or robotic systems.Amongst perceived benefits of navigation/robotic surgery was more accurate surgery (47%), quicker surgery (50%), and making the surgeon's job easier (52%).Sixty-nine percent believed navigation/robotics was more expensive and 20% believed it held no benefit against conventional surgery, with only 9% believing it led to longer surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, University College London Hospital, London, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Technology in orthopaedic surgery has become more widespread in the past 20 years, with emerging evidence of its benefits in arthroplasty. Although patients are aware of benefits of conventional joint replacement, little is known on patients' knowledge of the prevalence, benefits or drawbacks of surgery involving navigation or robotic systems.

Methods: In an outpatient arthroplasty clinic, 100 consecutive patients were approached and given questionnaires to assess their knowledge of navigation and robotics in orthopaedic surgery. Participation in the survey was voluntary.

Results: Ninety-eight patients volunteered to participate in the survey, mean age 56.2 years (range, 19 to 88 years; 52 female, 46 male). Forty percent of patients thought more than 30% of National Health Service (NHS) orthopaedic operations involved navigation or robotics; 80% believed this was the same level or less than the private sector. One-third believed most of an operation could be performed independently by a robotic/navigation system. Amongst perceived benefits of navigation/robotic surgery was more accurate surgery (47%), quicker surgery (50%), and making the surgeon's job easier (52%). Sixty-nine percent believed navigation/robotics was more expensive and 20% believed it held no benefit against conventional surgery, with only 9% believing it led to longer surgery. Almost 50% would not mind at least some of their operation being performed with use of robotics/navigation.

Conclusions: Although few patients were familiar with this new technology, there appeared to be a strong consensus it was quicker and more accurate than conventional surgery. Many patients appear to believe navigation and robotics in orthopaedic surgery is largely the preserve of the private sector. This study demonstrates public knowledge of such new technologies is limited and a need to inform patients of the relative merits and drawbacks of such surgery prior to their more widespread implementation.

Show MeSH