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Medical students' assessment of pediatric patients - teaching and evaluation using video cases.

Malon M, Cortes D, Greisen GO - BMC Med Educ (2014)

Bottom Line: The students' mean total Rubric score in spring 2012 (7.0) was significantly higher (p<0.001, 95% CI 1.34-3.20) than autumn 2011 (4.7).Single domains scores increased significantly for general assessment (1.30 versus 0.57) (p<0.002, 95% CI 0.45-1.18), recognition of principal symptoms (1.38 versus 0.81) (p<0.008, 95% CI 0.22-0.91), appropriate diagnosis (2.28 versus 1.78) (p<0.002, 95% CI 0.16-0.82) and consistency between observed symptoms and diagnosis (1.94 versus 1.57) (p=0.0482, 95% CI 0.00-0.79).Students improved in evaluating pediatric patients presented as video cases after the introduction of the program.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: We introduced video-based teaching in pediatrics. We evaluated the impact of a pediatric video program on student performance in assessing pediatric patients presented as video cases. The program consisted of a library of pediatric videos, and inclusion of these in the teaching and examination for pediatric medicine.

Methods: Medical students on a pediatric clerkship at the University of Copenhagen assessed eight short pediatric video cases during autumn 2011 and spring 2012. Two independent observers evaluated a subset of records in a pilot study. A blind evaluation was made of the written records of 37 students before, and 58 students after, the introduction of the program using a Rubric score with four domains.

Results: The intraobserver interclass correlation coefficient was 0.94 and the interobserver interclass correlation was 0.71(n=25). The students' mean total Rubric score in spring 2012 (7.0) was significantly higher (p<0.001, 95% CI 1.34-3.20) than autumn 2011 (4.7). Cohen's d was 1.1 (95% CI 0.6-1.7). Single domains scores increased significantly for general assessment (1.30 versus 0.57) (p<0.002, 95% CI 0.45-1.18), recognition of principal symptoms (1.38 versus 0.81) (p<0.008, 95% CI 0.22-0.91), appropriate diagnosis (2.28 versus 1.78) (p<0.002, 95% CI 0.16-0.82) and consistency between observed symptoms and diagnosis (1.94 versus 1.57) (p=0.0482, 95% CI 0.00-0.79).

Conclusions: Students improved in evaluating pediatric patients presented as video cases after the introduction of the program. The impact on real-life situations remains to be established.

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Total Rubric score of student records before and after introduction of the video case teaching program. The student mean total Rubric score after introduction of the video case teaching program in spring 2012 (7.0 ± 2.3) was significantly higher than the students’ total score in autumn 2011 (4.7 ± 2.0), (p < 0.001). The effect size (Cohen's d) was 1.1 (95% CI 0.6–1.7).
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Fig2: Total Rubric score of student records before and after introduction of the video case teaching program. The student mean total Rubric score after introduction of the video case teaching program in spring 2012 (7.0 ± 2.3) was significantly higher than the students’ total score in autumn 2011 (4.7 ± 2.0), (p < 0.001). The effect size (Cohen's d) was 1.1 (95% CI 0.6–1.7).

Mentions: The student mean total Rubric score in spring 2012 was significantly higher (7.0) than the students’ total score in autumn 2011 (4.7) (95% CI 1.34–3.20, p < 0.001) (Figures 2 and 3). The effect size (Cohen's d) was 1.1 (95% CI 0.6–1.7).Figure 2


Medical students' assessment of pediatric patients - teaching and evaluation using video cases.

Malon M, Cortes D, Greisen GO - BMC Med Educ (2014)

Total Rubric score of student records before and after introduction of the video case teaching program. The student mean total Rubric score after introduction of the video case teaching program in spring 2012 (7.0 ± 2.3) was significantly higher than the students’ total score in autumn 2011 (4.7 ± 2.0), (p < 0.001). The effect size (Cohen's d) was 1.1 (95% CI 0.6–1.7).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4233092&req=5

Fig2: Total Rubric score of student records before and after introduction of the video case teaching program. The student mean total Rubric score after introduction of the video case teaching program in spring 2012 (7.0 ± 2.3) was significantly higher than the students’ total score in autumn 2011 (4.7 ± 2.0), (p < 0.001). The effect size (Cohen's d) was 1.1 (95% CI 0.6–1.7).
Mentions: The student mean total Rubric score in spring 2012 was significantly higher (7.0) than the students’ total score in autumn 2011 (4.7) (95% CI 1.34–3.20, p < 0.001) (Figures 2 and 3). The effect size (Cohen's d) was 1.1 (95% CI 0.6–1.7).Figure 2

Bottom Line: The students' mean total Rubric score in spring 2012 (7.0) was significantly higher (p<0.001, 95% CI 1.34-3.20) than autumn 2011 (4.7).Single domains scores increased significantly for general assessment (1.30 versus 0.57) (p<0.002, 95% CI 0.45-1.18), recognition of principal symptoms (1.38 versus 0.81) (p<0.008, 95% CI 0.22-0.91), appropriate diagnosis (2.28 versus 1.78) (p<0.002, 95% CI 0.16-0.82) and consistency between observed symptoms and diagnosis (1.94 versus 1.57) (p=0.0482, 95% CI 0.00-0.79).Students improved in evaluating pediatric patients presented as video cases after the introduction of the program.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: We introduced video-based teaching in pediatrics. We evaluated the impact of a pediatric video program on student performance in assessing pediatric patients presented as video cases. The program consisted of a library of pediatric videos, and inclusion of these in the teaching and examination for pediatric medicine.

Methods: Medical students on a pediatric clerkship at the University of Copenhagen assessed eight short pediatric video cases during autumn 2011 and spring 2012. Two independent observers evaluated a subset of records in a pilot study. A blind evaluation was made of the written records of 37 students before, and 58 students after, the introduction of the program using a Rubric score with four domains.

Results: The intraobserver interclass correlation coefficient was 0.94 and the interobserver interclass correlation was 0.71(n=25). The students' mean total Rubric score in spring 2012 (7.0) was significantly higher (p<0.001, 95% CI 1.34-3.20) than autumn 2011 (4.7). Cohen's d was 1.1 (95% CI 0.6-1.7). Single domains scores increased significantly for general assessment (1.30 versus 0.57) (p<0.002, 95% CI 0.45-1.18), recognition of principal symptoms (1.38 versus 0.81) (p<0.008, 95% CI 0.22-0.91), appropriate diagnosis (2.28 versus 1.78) (p<0.002, 95% CI 0.16-0.82) and consistency between observed symptoms and diagnosis (1.94 versus 1.57) (p=0.0482, 95% CI 0.00-0.79).

Conclusions: Students improved in evaluating pediatric patients presented as video cases after the introduction of the program. The impact on real-life situations remains to be established.

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