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A case of pharyngeal injury in a patient with swallowed toothbrush: a case report.

Kim YH, Cho SI, Do NY, Park JH - BMC Res Notes (2014)

Bottom Line: One commonly found foreign body is a fish bone, ingested in most cases by carelessness or an accident.A 44-year-old Asian male visited the emergency room with chief complaints of intraoral pain and dysphagia that had started on the same day.The case with this patient, and a rapid diagnosis as well as treatment is imperative.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck surgery, Chosun University, 365 Pilmun-daero, Dong-gu, Gwanju 501-717, South Korea. entjh28@chosun.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT

Background: Otolaryngologists encounter cases of various foreign bodies in the oral and pharyngeal regions. One commonly found foreign body is a fish bone, ingested in most cases by carelessness or an accident. These foreign materials are removed by endoscopy or through a simple procedure. However, hypopharyngeal damage is rarely caused by a foreign body in the pharynx following the swallowing of a toothbrush.

Case presentation: A 44-year-old Asian male visited the emergency room with chief complaints of intraoral pain and dysphagia that had started on the same day. The patient had paranoid-type schizophrenia that began 10 years ago; he had been hospitalized and was being treated at another clinic, and was transferred to the emergency room by the medical staff after swallowing a toothbrush. We successfully removed a toothbrush located within the pharynx of a patient with a history of a psychologic disorder via surgery and conservative treatment.

Conclusion: The case with this patient, and a rapid diagnosis as well as treatment is imperative. The presence and state of a foreign body must be determined through a careful physical examination and imaging, followed by the immediate removal of the foreign body, all while keeping in mind the possibility of accompanying damage to nearby tissues.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

(Arrow) A small leakage was observed on an esophagogram performed on the first postoperative day.
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Fig6: (Arrow) A small leakage was observed on an esophagogram performed on the first postoperative day.

Mentions: To evaluate hypopharyngeal and esophageal damage, an esophagogram was obtained using a water-soluble contrast dye on the first postoperative day, and a small perforation in the hypopharyngeal region was identified. Accordingly, the patient received conservative therapy, including intravenous broad-range antibiotic administration and was placed on oral dietary restrictions. No specific findings or complications were detected via the esophagogram on the 10th postoperative day, and the patient was subsequently discharged and is currently being followed up (FiguresĀ 6 and 7).Figure 6


A case of pharyngeal injury in a patient with swallowed toothbrush: a case report.

Kim YH, Cho SI, Do NY, Park JH - BMC Res Notes (2014)

(Arrow) A small leakage was observed on an esophagogram performed on the first postoperative day.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4233075&req=5

Fig6: (Arrow) A small leakage was observed on an esophagogram performed on the first postoperative day.
Mentions: To evaluate hypopharyngeal and esophageal damage, an esophagogram was obtained using a water-soluble contrast dye on the first postoperative day, and a small perforation in the hypopharyngeal region was identified. Accordingly, the patient received conservative therapy, including intravenous broad-range antibiotic administration and was placed on oral dietary restrictions. No specific findings or complications were detected via the esophagogram on the 10th postoperative day, and the patient was subsequently discharged and is currently being followed up (FiguresĀ 6 and 7).Figure 6

Bottom Line: One commonly found foreign body is a fish bone, ingested in most cases by carelessness or an accident.A 44-year-old Asian male visited the emergency room with chief complaints of intraoral pain and dysphagia that had started on the same day.The case with this patient, and a rapid diagnosis as well as treatment is imperative.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck surgery, Chosun University, 365 Pilmun-daero, Dong-gu, Gwanju 501-717, South Korea. entjh28@chosun.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT

Background: Otolaryngologists encounter cases of various foreign bodies in the oral and pharyngeal regions. One commonly found foreign body is a fish bone, ingested in most cases by carelessness or an accident. These foreign materials are removed by endoscopy or through a simple procedure. However, hypopharyngeal damage is rarely caused by a foreign body in the pharynx following the swallowing of a toothbrush.

Case presentation: A 44-year-old Asian male visited the emergency room with chief complaints of intraoral pain and dysphagia that had started on the same day. The patient had paranoid-type schizophrenia that began 10 years ago; he had been hospitalized and was being treated at another clinic, and was transferred to the emergency room by the medical staff after swallowing a toothbrush. We successfully removed a toothbrush located within the pharynx of a patient with a history of a psychologic disorder via surgery and conservative treatment.

Conclusion: The case with this patient, and a rapid diagnosis as well as treatment is imperative. The presence and state of a foreign body must be determined through a careful physical examination and imaging, followed by the immediate removal of the foreign body, all while keeping in mind the possibility of accompanying damage to nearby tissues.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus