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Embryonic development of goldfish (Carassius auratus): a model for the study of evolutionary change in developmental mechanisms by artificial selection.

Tsai HY, Chang M, Liu SC, Abe G, Ota KG - Dev. Dyn. (2013)

Bottom Line: Here we describe the embryological development of the common goldfish (the single fin Wakin), which retains the ancestral morphology of this species.We divided goldfish embryonic development into seven periods consisting of 34 stages, using previously reported developmental indices of zebrafish and goldfish.These results provide an opportunity for further study of the evolutionary relationship between domestication and development, through applying well-established zebrafish molecular biological resources to goldfish embryos.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Aquatic Zoology, Marine Research Station, Institute of Cellular and Organismic Biology, Academia Sinica, Yilan, Taiwan; The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Midlothian, United Kingdom.

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Segmentation stage of goldfish embryos. A: Left lateral view of a six-somite stage embryo. The optic primordium is indicated by the black arrowhead. Exposed yolk is indicated by white arrows in A and B. B: Left lateral view of a 10-somite stage embryo. Divisions of the brain rudiment are indicated by black arrowheads. C: Left lateral view of a 14-somite stage embryo. The rudiment of cerebellum and rhombomeric regions are indicated by black arrowheads in C and F. Kupffer’s vesicles are indicated by white arrowheads in C to F. D: Left lateral view of a 18-somite stage embryo. Construction of yolk is recognizable (white asterisk). E: Dechorionated 10–12 somite stage embryos. F: Dechorionated 13–16 somite stage embryos. G: Left lateral view of a 22-somite stage embryo. White hatched lines indicate approximate sectioned level in Figure 1. ce, cerebellum; cff, caudal fin fold; fp, floor plate; mes, mesencephalon; nt, notochord; otic, otic vesicle; tel, telencephalon; y. b, yolk ball; y. ext, yolk extension. Scale bar = 0.5 mm.
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fig10: Segmentation stage of goldfish embryos. A: Left lateral view of a six-somite stage embryo. The optic primordium is indicated by the black arrowhead. Exposed yolk is indicated by white arrows in A and B. B: Left lateral view of a 10-somite stage embryo. Divisions of the brain rudiment are indicated by black arrowheads. C: Left lateral view of a 14-somite stage embryo. The rudiment of cerebellum and rhombomeric regions are indicated by black arrowheads in C and F. Kupffer’s vesicles are indicated by white arrowheads in C to F. D: Left lateral view of a 18-somite stage embryo. Construction of yolk is recognizable (white asterisk). E: Dechorionated 10–12 somite stage embryos. F: Dechorionated 13–16 somite stage embryos. G: Left lateral view of a 22-somite stage embryo. White hatched lines indicate approximate sectioned level in Figure 1. ce, cerebellum; cff, caudal fin fold; fp, floor plate; mes, mesencephalon; nt, notochord; otic, otic vesicle; tel, telencephalon; y. b, yolk ball; y. ext, yolk extension. Scale bar = 0.5 mm.

Mentions: The tail bud and polster are distinctly prominent (Fig. 8O). The blastopore is completely closed (100%-epiboly) in most embryos (Fig. 8O). One to five somites exist even before 100%-epiboly in a few embryos, as reported in the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) (Hall et al., 2004; Fujimura and Okada, 2007). In fact, a small amount of yolk is not covered by the blastoderm and is excluded from the embryo even during somite genesis (Fig. 10; also described in the next section).


Embryonic development of goldfish (Carassius auratus): a model for the study of evolutionary change in developmental mechanisms by artificial selection.

Tsai HY, Chang M, Liu SC, Abe G, Ota KG - Dev. Dyn. (2013)

Segmentation stage of goldfish embryos. A: Left lateral view of a six-somite stage embryo. The optic primordium is indicated by the black arrowhead. Exposed yolk is indicated by white arrows in A and B. B: Left lateral view of a 10-somite stage embryo. Divisions of the brain rudiment are indicated by black arrowheads. C: Left lateral view of a 14-somite stage embryo. The rudiment of cerebellum and rhombomeric regions are indicated by black arrowheads in C and F. Kupffer’s vesicles are indicated by white arrowheads in C to F. D: Left lateral view of a 18-somite stage embryo. Construction of yolk is recognizable (white asterisk). E: Dechorionated 10–12 somite stage embryos. F: Dechorionated 13–16 somite stage embryos. G: Left lateral view of a 22-somite stage embryo. White hatched lines indicate approximate sectioned level in Figure 1. ce, cerebellum; cff, caudal fin fold; fp, floor plate; mes, mesencephalon; nt, notochord; otic, otic vesicle; tel, telencephalon; y. b, yolk ball; y. ext, yolk extension. Scale bar = 0.5 mm.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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fig10: Segmentation stage of goldfish embryos. A: Left lateral view of a six-somite stage embryo. The optic primordium is indicated by the black arrowhead. Exposed yolk is indicated by white arrows in A and B. B: Left lateral view of a 10-somite stage embryo. Divisions of the brain rudiment are indicated by black arrowheads. C: Left lateral view of a 14-somite stage embryo. The rudiment of cerebellum and rhombomeric regions are indicated by black arrowheads in C and F. Kupffer’s vesicles are indicated by white arrowheads in C to F. D: Left lateral view of a 18-somite stage embryo. Construction of yolk is recognizable (white asterisk). E: Dechorionated 10–12 somite stage embryos. F: Dechorionated 13–16 somite stage embryos. G: Left lateral view of a 22-somite stage embryo. White hatched lines indicate approximate sectioned level in Figure 1. ce, cerebellum; cff, caudal fin fold; fp, floor plate; mes, mesencephalon; nt, notochord; otic, otic vesicle; tel, telencephalon; y. b, yolk ball; y. ext, yolk extension. Scale bar = 0.5 mm.
Mentions: The tail bud and polster are distinctly prominent (Fig. 8O). The blastopore is completely closed (100%-epiboly) in most embryos (Fig. 8O). One to five somites exist even before 100%-epiboly in a few embryos, as reported in the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) (Hall et al., 2004; Fujimura and Okada, 2007). In fact, a small amount of yolk is not covered by the blastoderm and is excluded from the embryo even during somite genesis (Fig. 10; also described in the next section).

Bottom Line: Here we describe the embryological development of the common goldfish (the single fin Wakin), which retains the ancestral morphology of this species.We divided goldfish embryonic development into seven periods consisting of 34 stages, using previously reported developmental indices of zebrafish and goldfish.These results provide an opportunity for further study of the evolutionary relationship between domestication and development, through applying well-established zebrafish molecular biological resources to goldfish embryos.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Aquatic Zoology, Marine Research Station, Institute of Cellular and Organismic Biology, Academia Sinica, Yilan, Taiwan; The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Midlothian, United Kingdom.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus