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A novel approach to assessing the prevalence and drivers of illegal bushmeat hunting in the serengeti.

Nuno A, Bunnefeld N, Naiman LC, Milner-Gulland EJ - Conserv. Biol. (2013)

Bottom Line: The majority of respondents found the UCT questions easy to understand and were comfortable answering them.Our results suggest poaching remains widespread in the Serengeti and current alternative sources of income may not be sufficiently attractive to compete with the opportunities provided by hunting.We demonstrate that the UCT is well suited to investigating noncompliance in conservation because it reduces evasive responses, resulting in more accurate estimates, and is technically simple to apply.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park, Buckhurst Road, Ascot, SL5 7PY, United Kingdom. ana.nuno08@imperial.ac.uk.

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Estimated prevalence (SE) of illegal bushmeat hunting in the western Serengeti during the 12 months prior to the study. Estimates obtained from model fitted only with the random effects and question topic and card type (treatment or control) as fixed effects (dry, dry season; all, cash and other reasons; cash, cash income; wet, wet season).
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fig02: Estimated prevalence (SE) of illegal bushmeat hunting in the western Serengeti during the 12 months prior to the study. Estimates obtained from model fitted only with the random effects and question topic and card type (treatment or control) as fixed effects (dry, dry season; all, cash and other reasons; cash, cash income; wet, wet season).

Mentions: Bushmeat hunting was conducted by approximately 18% (SE 5) of the households in the western Serengeti during the 12 months prior to survey administration. More households were involved in illegal hunting during the dry season than in the wet season, and hunting households predominately generated cash income from bushmeat, particularly in the dry season (Fig. 2). However, the differences between season and the season × cash interaction were not significant.


A novel approach to assessing the prevalence and drivers of illegal bushmeat hunting in the serengeti.

Nuno A, Bunnefeld N, Naiman LC, Milner-Gulland EJ - Conserv. Biol. (2013)

Estimated prevalence (SE) of illegal bushmeat hunting in the western Serengeti during the 12 months prior to the study. Estimates obtained from model fitted only with the random effects and question topic and card type (treatment or control) as fixed effects (dry, dry season; all, cash and other reasons; cash, cash income; wet, wet season).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232883&req=5

fig02: Estimated prevalence (SE) of illegal bushmeat hunting in the western Serengeti during the 12 months prior to the study. Estimates obtained from model fitted only with the random effects and question topic and card type (treatment or control) as fixed effects (dry, dry season; all, cash and other reasons; cash, cash income; wet, wet season).
Mentions: Bushmeat hunting was conducted by approximately 18% (SE 5) of the households in the western Serengeti during the 12 months prior to survey administration. More households were involved in illegal hunting during the dry season than in the wet season, and hunting households predominately generated cash income from bushmeat, particularly in the dry season (Fig. 2). However, the differences between season and the season × cash interaction were not significant.

Bottom Line: The majority of respondents found the UCT questions easy to understand and were comfortable answering them.Our results suggest poaching remains widespread in the Serengeti and current alternative sources of income may not be sufficiently attractive to compete with the opportunities provided by hunting.We demonstrate that the UCT is well suited to investigating noncompliance in conservation because it reduces evasive responses, resulting in more accurate estimates, and is technically simple to apply.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park, Buckhurst Road, Ascot, SL5 7PY, United Kingdom. ana.nuno08@imperial.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus