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Localizing evoked and induced responses to faces using magnetoencephalography.

Perry G, Singh KD - Eur. J. Neurosci. (2014)

Bottom Line: Recently, a number of studies have used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to try to record these responses non-invasively - in many cases using source analysis techniques based on the beamforming method.We localized the gamma-band response to bilateral lateral occipital cortex, and both the gamma-band response and the M170-evoked response to the right fusiform gyrus.These findings help to establish that MEG beamforming can localize face-specific responses in time, frequency and space with good accuracy (when validated against established findings from functional magnetic resonance imaging and intracranial recordings), as well as contributing to the establishment of best methodological practice for the use of the beamformer method to measure face-specific responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre (CUBRIC), School of Psychology, Cardiff University, 70 Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT, Wales, UK.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Plot of the number of sensors for which the response to stimuli (averaged across all trials of both conditions) significantly differed from zero for each time × frequency point. The colour scale depicts number of significant sensors.
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fig01: Plot of the number of sensors for which the response to stimuli (averaged across all trials of both conditions) significantly differed from zero for each time × frequency point. The colour scale depicts number of significant sensors.

Mentions: Figure1 shows the number of significant sensors at each time × frequency point. Based on this figure we determined three TFWOIs: 0–6 Hz, 100–600 ms; 15–40 Hz, 150–500 ms; 55–120 Hz, 100–400 ms. We refer to these time windows as: delta/theta, beta and gamma, respectively.


Localizing evoked and induced responses to faces using magnetoencephalography.

Perry G, Singh KD - Eur. J. Neurosci. (2014)

Plot of the number of sensors for which the response to stimuli (averaged across all trials of both conditions) significantly differed from zero for each time × frequency point. The colour scale depicts number of significant sensors.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232859&req=5

fig01: Plot of the number of sensors for which the response to stimuli (averaged across all trials of both conditions) significantly differed from zero for each time × frequency point. The colour scale depicts number of significant sensors.
Mentions: Figure1 shows the number of significant sensors at each time × frequency point. Based on this figure we determined three TFWOIs: 0–6 Hz, 100–600 ms; 15–40 Hz, 150–500 ms; 55–120 Hz, 100–400 ms. We refer to these time windows as: delta/theta, beta and gamma, respectively.

Bottom Line: Recently, a number of studies have used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to try to record these responses non-invasively - in many cases using source analysis techniques based on the beamforming method.We localized the gamma-band response to bilateral lateral occipital cortex, and both the gamma-band response and the M170-evoked response to the right fusiform gyrus.These findings help to establish that MEG beamforming can localize face-specific responses in time, frequency and space with good accuracy (when validated against established findings from functional magnetic resonance imaging and intracranial recordings), as well as contributing to the establishment of best methodological practice for the use of the beamformer method to measure face-specific responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre (CUBRIC), School of Psychology, Cardiff University, 70 Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT, Wales, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus