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Near-isogenic lines of Triticum aestivum with distinct modes of resistance exhibit dissimilar transcriptional regulation during Diuraphis noxia feeding.

Botha AM, van Eck L, Burger NF, Swanevelder ZH - Biol Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Although the effects of several D. noxia (Dn) resistance genes are known, none have been isolated or characterized.Tolerance is a passive resistance mechanism that acts through repair or de novo synthesis of photosystem proteins.Results further suggest that ethylene-mediated pathways are possibly involved in generating volatile compounds and cell wall fortification during the antixenosic response.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Genetics, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch 7601, South Africa ambo@sun.ac.za.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Symptoms of D. noxia infestation on susceptible wheat, indicating leaf rolling (arrow) (left), purplish streaking and chlorosis (right).
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f01: Symptoms of D. noxia infestation on susceptible wheat, indicating leaf rolling (arrow) (left), purplish streaking and chlorosis (right).

Mentions: During compatible interactions with susceptible wheat cultivars, Diuraphis noxia feeding interferes with the osmoregulation of leaf turgor pressure during cell elongation (Burd and Burton, 1992), preventing the proper unfolding of new leaves (Fig. 1). Additionally, feeding causes chlorosis and longitudinal streaking, reducing leaf chlorophyll content (Fig. 1) (Heng-Moss et al., 2003; Botha et al., 2005; Botha et al., 2006). The result is decreased photosynthetic potential and the eventual collapse of the plant (Burd and Burton, 1992). This has historically been ascribed to a phytotoxin injected during feeding, presumed responsible for chloroplast disintegration (Fouché et al., 1984), but such a phytotoxic effector has never been isolated or characterized. Current hypotheses suggest that D. noxia feeding induces malfunctioning of the photosynthetic apparatus at the stacked region of the thylakoid membrane, although the exact site of interference has not been determined either (Burd and Elliott, 1996; Heng-Moss et al., 2003). However, D. noxia feeding does not induce total breakdown of the chloroplast, (Haile et al., 1999; van der Westhuizen et al., 1998a) and feeding-induced chlorosis differs from normal chlorophyll degradation that occurs during leaf senescence (Ni et al., 2001; Wang et al., 2004a).


Near-isogenic lines of Triticum aestivum with distinct modes of resistance exhibit dissimilar transcriptional regulation during Diuraphis noxia feeding.

Botha AM, van Eck L, Burger NF, Swanevelder ZH - Biol Open (2014)

Symptoms of D. noxia infestation on susceptible wheat, indicating leaf rolling (arrow) (left), purplish streaking and chlorosis (right).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232770&req=5

f01: Symptoms of D. noxia infestation on susceptible wheat, indicating leaf rolling (arrow) (left), purplish streaking and chlorosis (right).
Mentions: During compatible interactions with susceptible wheat cultivars, Diuraphis noxia feeding interferes with the osmoregulation of leaf turgor pressure during cell elongation (Burd and Burton, 1992), preventing the proper unfolding of new leaves (Fig. 1). Additionally, feeding causes chlorosis and longitudinal streaking, reducing leaf chlorophyll content (Fig. 1) (Heng-Moss et al., 2003; Botha et al., 2005; Botha et al., 2006). The result is decreased photosynthetic potential and the eventual collapse of the plant (Burd and Burton, 1992). This has historically been ascribed to a phytotoxin injected during feeding, presumed responsible for chloroplast disintegration (Fouché et al., 1984), but such a phytotoxic effector has never been isolated or characterized. Current hypotheses suggest that D. noxia feeding induces malfunctioning of the photosynthetic apparatus at the stacked region of the thylakoid membrane, although the exact site of interference has not been determined either (Burd and Elliott, 1996; Heng-Moss et al., 2003). However, D. noxia feeding does not induce total breakdown of the chloroplast, (Haile et al., 1999; van der Westhuizen et al., 1998a) and feeding-induced chlorosis differs from normal chlorophyll degradation that occurs during leaf senescence (Ni et al., 2001; Wang et al., 2004a).

Bottom Line: Although the effects of several D. noxia (Dn) resistance genes are known, none have been isolated or characterized.Tolerance is a passive resistance mechanism that acts through repair or de novo synthesis of photosystem proteins.Results further suggest that ethylene-mediated pathways are possibly involved in generating volatile compounds and cell wall fortification during the antixenosic response.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Genetics, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch 7601, South Africa ambo@sun.ac.za.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus