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Excepting Myotis capaccinii, the wings' contribution to take-off performance does not correlate with foraging ecology in six species of insectivorous bat.

Gardiner JD, Altringham JD, Papadatou E, Nudds RL - Biol Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Despite distinct differences in foraging strategy, the mass specific power generated by the bats during wing induced take-off did not differ between species, with the exception of Myotis capaccinii.The poorer take-off performance of M. capaccinii could be related to either a reduction in wing-stroke amplitude to stop the wings hitting the water's surface during foraging or perhaps an effect of having very large feet.No scaling relationship between body mass and mass-specific take-off power was found, which supports earlier research on birds and insects, suggesting that the mass-specific muscle power available for flight is broadly similar across a large range of body sizes and species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Scaling relationships for the six bat species M. blythii (Mb), M. capaccinii (Mc), M. myotis (Mm), R. blasii (Rb), R. euryale (Re) and M. schreibersii (Ms).(A) Showing no scaling relationship of loge mass-specific wing induced take-off power against loge body mass. Grey dashed line is scaling relationship including M. capaccinii (grey data point) and solid black line is relationship excluding M. capaccinii. (B) Scaling relationship of loge wing-beat frequency against loge body mass. Wing-beat frequency scaled (y = 1.11−0.305x) predictably against body mass. The slope of the relationship was not significantly different from the expected slope of −0.33.
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f03: Scaling relationships for the six bat species M. blythii (Mb), M. capaccinii (Mc), M. myotis (Mm), R. blasii (Rb), R. euryale (Re) and M. schreibersii (Ms).(A) Showing no scaling relationship of loge mass-specific wing induced take-off power against loge body mass. Grey dashed line is scaling relationship including M. capaccinii (grey data point) and solid black line is relationship excluding M. capaccinii. (B) Scaling relationship of loge wing-beat frequency against loge body mass. Wing-beat frequency scaled (y = 1.11−0.305x) predictably against body mass. The slope of the relationship was not significantly different from the expected slope of −0.33.

Mentions: Mean mass-specific wing induced take-off power was independent of Mb (F1,4 = 0.56, r2 = 0.12, p = 0.49) (Fig. 3A). When M. capaccinii was excluded from the regression (Fig. 3A), because it was an outlier, there was still no scaling relationship between mass-specific wing induced take-off power and Mb (F1,3 = 0.28, r2 = 0.09, p = 0.63).


Excepting Myotis capaccinii, the wings' contribution to take-off performance does not correlate with foraging ecology in six species of insectivorous bat.

Gardiner JD, Altringham JD, Papadatou E, Nudds RL - Biol Open (2014)

Scaling relationships for the six bat species M. blythii (Mb), M. capaccinii (Mc), M. myotis (Mm), R. blasii (Rb), R. euryale (Re) and M. schreibersii (Ms).(A) Showing no scaling relationship of loge mass-specific wing induced take-off power against loge body mass. Grey dashed line is scaling relationship including M. capaccinii (grey data point) and solid black line is relationship excluding M. capaccinii. (B) Scaling relationship of loge wing-beat frequency against loge body mass. Wing-beat frequency scaled (y = 1.11−0.305x) predictably against body mass. The slope of the relationship was not significantly different from the expected slope of −0.33.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232763&req=5

f03: Scaling relationships for the six bat species M. blythii (Mb), M. capaccinii (Mc), M. myotis (Mm), R. blasii (Rb), R. euryale (Re) and M. schreibersii (Ms).(A) Showing no scaling relationship of loge mass-specific wing induced take-off power against loge body mass. Grey dashed line is scaling relationship including M. capaccinii (grey data point) and solid black line is relationship excluding M. capaccinii. (B) Scaling relationship of loge wing-beat frequency against loge body mass. Wing-beat frequency scaled (y = 1.11−0.305x) predictably against body mass. The slope of the relationship was not significantly different from the expected slope of −0.33.
Mentions: Mean mass-specific wing induced take-off power was independent of Mb (F1,4 = 0.56, r2 = 0.12, p = 0.49) (Fig. 3A). When M. capaccinii was excluded from the regression (Fig. 3A), because it was an outlier, there was still no scaling relationship between mass-specific wing induced take-off power and Mb (F1,3 = 0.28, r2 = 0.09, p = 0.63).

Bottom Line: Despite distinct differences in foraging strategy, the mass specific power generated by the bats during wing induced take-off did not differ between species, with the exception of Myotis capaccinii.The poorer take-off performance of M. capaccinii could be related to either a reduction in wing-stroke amplitude to stop the wings hitting the water's surface during foraging or perhaps an effect of having very large feet.No scaling relationship between body mass and mass-specific take-off power was found, which supports earlier research on birds and insects, suggesting that the mass-specific muscle power available for flight is broadly similar across a large range of body sizes and species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT, UK.

No MeSH data available.