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Excepting Myotis capaccinii, the wings' contribution to take-off performance does not correlate with foraging ecology in six species of insectivorous bat.

Gardiner JD, Altringham JD, Papadatou E, Nudds RL - Biol Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Despite distinct differences in foraging strategy, the mass specific power generated by the bats during wing induced take-off did not differ between species, with the exception of Myotis capaccinii.The poorer take-off performance of M. capaccinii could be related to either a reduction in wing-stroke amplitude to stop the wings hitting the water's surface during foraging or perhaps an effect of having very large feet.No scaling relationship between body mass and mass-specific take-off power was found, which supports earlier research on birds and insects, suggesting that the mass-specific muscle power available for flight is broadly similar across a large range of body sizes and species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Mean mass-specific wing induced take-off power of six bat species: M. blythii (n = 3), M. capaccinii (n = 15), M. myotis (n = 5), R. blasii (n = 7), R. euryale (n = 2) and M. schreibersii (n = 17).Bars with the asterisk (*) are significantly different from others (ANOVA with Tukey's least significant difference (LSD) post-hoc procedure). All data are shown with standard error bars.
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f02: Mean mass-specific wing induced take-off power of six bat species: M. blythii (n = 3), M. capaccinii (n = 15), M. myotis (n = 5), R. blasii (n = 7), R. euryale (n = 2) and M. schreibersii (n = 17).Bars with the asterisk (*) are significantly different from others (ANOVA with Tukey's least significant difference (LSD) post-hoc procedure). All data are shown with standard error bars.

Mentions: The mean mass-specific wing induced take-off power output (Fig. 2) differed between species (F5,43 = 6.92, r2 = 0.45, p<0.001). All bats except for M. capaccinii, however, produced between 12 and 16 W/kg of mass-specific power. Myotis capaccinii produced significantly lower mass-specific wing induced take-off power than all other species (Table 2). The mean values (W/kg) were 12.62±1.92 (M. blythii), 7.09±0.86 (M. capaccinii), 13.75±1.48 (M. myotis), 13.19±1.25 (R. blasii), 15.81±2.35 (R. eurayle) and 12.27±0.80 (M. schreibersii).


Excepting Myotis capaccinii, the wings' contribution to take-off performance does not correlate with foraging ecology in six species of insectivorous bat.

Gardiner JD, Altringham JD, Papadatou E, Nudds RL - Biol Open (2014)

Mean mass-specific wing induced take-off power of six bat species: M. blythii (n = 3), M. capaccinii (n = 15), M. myotis (n = 5), R. blasii (n = 7), R. euryale (n = 2) and M. schreibersii (n = 17).Bars with the asterisk (*) are significantly different from others (ANOVA with Tukey's least significant difference (LSD) post-hoc procedure). All data are shown with standard error bars.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232763&req=5

f02: Mean mass-specific wing induced take-off power of six bat species: M. blythii (n = 3), M. capaccinii (n = 15), M. myotis (n = 5), R. blasii (n = 7), R. euryale (n = 2) and M. schreibersii (n = 17).Bars with the asterisk (*) are significantly different from others (ANOVA with Tukey's least significant difference (LSD) post-hoc procedure). All data are shown with standard error bars.
Mentions: The mean mass-specific wing induced take-off power output (Fig. 2) differed between species (F5,43 = 6.92, r2 = 0.45, p<0.001). All bats except for M. capaccinii, however, produced between 12 and 16 W/kg of mass-specific power. Myotis capaccinii produced significantly lower mass-specific wing induced take-off power than all other species (Table 2). The mean values (W/kg) were 12.62±1.92 (M. blythii), 7.09±0.86 (M. capaccinii), 13.75±1.48 (M. myotis), 13.19±1.25 (R. blasii), 15.81±2.35 (R. eurayle) and 12.27±0.80 (M. schreibersii).

Bottom Line: Despite distinct differences in foraging strategy, the mass specific power generated by the bats during wing induced take-off did not differ between species, with the exception of Myotis capaccinii.The poorer take-off performance of M. capaccinii could be related to either a reduction in wing-stroke amplitude to stop the wings hitting the water's surface during foraging or perhaps an effect of having very large feet.No scaling relationship between body mass and mass-specific take-off power was found, which supports earlier research on birds and insects, suggesting that the mass-specific muscle power available for flight is broadly similar across a large range of body sizes and species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT, UK.

No MeSH data available.