Limits...
Maintaining a surgery service for local hospitals under the situation of a decreasing number of surgeons in a region of Japan.

Watanabe J, Saito H, Otani S, Ikeguchi M - World J Surg (2014)

Bottom Line: The emergency operation rate was 17.3 %.Our strategy has produced a continuous surgical service at local hospitals in the face of diminishing numbers of surgeons.We recommend that such a strategy be adopted in other regions in which there are a decreasing number of surgeons and where it is not easy to move patients elsewhere for care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Tottori University Hospital, 36-1 Nishi-cho, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8504, Japan, watanabe.j@med.tottori-u.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT

Background: The number of surgeons is decreasing in Japan, leading to the problem of how to maintain a surgery service in local hospitals. We introduce our strategy for supporting ongoing surgical services in regional hospitals by dispatching surgeons temporarily to assist in operations.

Methods: We conducted a questionnaire-based survey at three local hospitals in Tottori and a neighboring prefecture to which surgeons from our department were temporarily dispatched over 5 years from January 2008 to March 2013.

Results: We supported 686 operations at three hospitals over 5 years. The average age of the patients was 72.4 years. Of the diseases treated, 45.1 % were malignant, and 54.9 % were benign. The emergency operation rate was 17.3 %.

Conclusions: Our strategy has produced a continuous surgical service at local hospitals in the face of diminishing numbers of surgeons. We recommend that such a strategy be adopted in other regions in which there are a decreasing number of surgeons and where it is not easy to move patients elsewhere for care.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of Tottori University Hospital and local hospitals. Location of hospitals with surgery service is limited to those near the university hospital
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Fig2: Location of Tottori University Hospital and local hospitals. Location of hospitals with surgery service is limited to those near the university hospital

Mentions: Our hospital is located in Tottori Prefecture, one of the most sparsely populated areas in Japan. In Tottori, the number of elderly persons is increasing while the population as a whole is decreasing. The number of surgeons per 100,000 population in Tottori prefecture remains higher than the average for Japan (Fig. 1). At present, however, it has reached its lowest level [1], thereby leading to a detrimental effect on surgical services at local hospitals. Our department in Tottori University Hospital delivers gastrointestinal surgery and pediatric surgery services to Tottori and affiliated neighborhood hospitals nearby (Fig. 2). We describe our strategy for supplementing the surgery service in surrounding local hospitals by dispatching surgeons to assist in operations.Fig. 1


Maintaining a surgery service for local hospitals under the situation of a decreasing number of surgeons in a region of Japan.

Watanabe J, Saito H, Otani S, Ikeguchi M - World J Surg (2014)

Location of Tottori University Hospital and local hospitals. Location of hospitals with surgery service is limited to those near the university hospital
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232756&req=5

Fig2: Location of Tottori University Hospital and local hospitals. Location of hospitals with surgery service is limited to those near the university hospital
Mentions: Our hospital is located in Tottori Prefecture, one of the most sparsely populated areas in Japan. In Tottori, the number of elderly persons is increasing while the population as a whole is decreasing. The number of surgeons per 100,000 population in Tottori prefecture remains higher than the average for Japan (Fig. 1). At present, however, it has reached its lowest level [1], thereby leading to a detrimental effect on surgical services at local hospitals. Our department in Tottori University Hospital delivers gastrointestinal surgery and pediatric surgery services to Tottori and affiliated neighborhood hospitals nearby (Fig. 2). We describe our strategy for supplementing the surgery service in surrounding local hospitals by dispatching surgeons to assist in operations.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The emergency operation rate was 17.3 %.Our strategy has produced a continuous surgical service at local hospitals in the face of diminishing numbers of surgeons.We recommend that such a strategy be adopted in other regions in which there are a decreasing number of surgeons and where it is not easy to move patients elsewhere for care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Tottori University Hospital, 36-1 Nishi-cho, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8504, Japan, watanabe.j@med.tottori-u.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT

Background: The number of surgeons is decreasing in Japan, leading to the problem of how to maintain a surgery service in local hospitals. We introduce our strategy for supporting ongoing surgical services in regional hospitals by dispatching surgeons temporarily to assist in operations.

Methods: We conducted a questionnaire-based survey at three local hospitals in Tottori and a neighboring prefecture to which surgeons from our department were temporarily dispatched over 5 years from January 2008 to March 2013.

Results: We supported 686 operations at three hospitals over 5 years. The average age of the patients was 72.4 years. Of the diseases treated, 45.1 % were malignant, and 54.9 % were benign. The emergency operation rate was 17.3 %.

Conclusions: Our strategy has produced a continuous surgical service at local hospitals in the face of diminishing numbers of surgeons. We recommend that such a strategy be adopted in other regions in which there are a decreasing number of surgeons and where it is not easy to move patients elsewhere for care.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus