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The cost of anal cancer in England: retrospective hospital data analysis and Markov model.

Keeping ST, Tempest MJ, Stephens SJ, Carroll SM, Nugent KP, O'Dwyer ST - BMC Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: Little is known regarding the associated costs and resource use.Results were most sensitive to the mode of admission for primary treatment and the costs of staging/diagnosis (inflated range: £14,309-£23,264).Further observational work is required in order to verify these findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pharmerit Ltd, Enterprise House, Innovation Way, York YO10 5NQ, UK. mtempest@pharmerit.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Anal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach to treatment with often complex interventions. Little is known regarding the associated costs and resource use.

Methods: Patient records were extracted from a national hospital database to estimate the number of patients treated for anal cancer in England. Identified resource use was linked to published UK cost estimates to quantify the reimbursement of treatment through the Payment by Results system. A mathematical model was developed simultaneously to validate findings and to calculate the average 10-year cost of treating a squamous cell anal carcinoma case from diagnosis. The model utilised data from the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland's anal cancer position statement.

Results: On average, 1,564 patients were admitted to hospital and 389 attended an outpatient facility per year. The average annual cost per inpatient and outpatient ranged from £4,562-£5,230 and £1,146-£1,335, respectively. Based on the model estimates, the inflated cost per case was between £16,470-£16,652. Results were most sensitive to the mode of admission for primary treatment and the costs of staging/diagnosis (inflated range: £14,309-£23,264).

Conclusions: Despite limitations in the available data, these results indicate that the cost of treating anal cancer is significant. Further observational work is required in order to verify these findings.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Predicted a) all-cause mortality and b) cumulative relapse compared to data from the UKCCCR anal cancer trial (ACT 1).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig3: Predicted a) all-cause mortality and b) cumulative relapse compared to data from the UKCCCR anal cancer trial (ACT 1).

Mentions: Figure 3 shows the model predictions for cumulative all-cause mortality and relapse, compared to data from the UKCCR Anal Cancer Trial (ACT 1), for the best fitting set of parameters which could be achieved through the calibration process.Figure 3


The cost of anal cancer in England: retrospective hospital data analysis and Markov model.

Keeping ST, Tempest MJ, Stephens SJ, Carroll SM, Nugent KP, O'Dwyer ST - BMC Public Health (2014)

Predicted a) all-cause mortality and b) cumulative relapse compared to data from the UKCCCR anal cancer trial (ACT 1).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232734&req=5

Fig3: Predicted a) all-cause mortality and b) cumulative relapse compared to data from the UKCCCR anal cancer trial (ACT 1).
Mentions: Figure 3 shows the model predictions for cumulative all-cause mortality and relapse, compared to data from the UKCCR Anal Cancer Trial (ACT 1), for the best fitting set of parameters which could be achieved through the calibration process.Figure 3

Bottom Line: Little is known regarding the associated costs and resource use.Results were most sensitive to the mode of admission for primary treatment and the costs of staging/diagnosis (inflated range: £14,309-£23,264).Further observational work is required in order to verify these findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pharmerit Ltd, Enterprise House, Innovation Way, York YO10 5NQ, UK. mtempest@pharmerit.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Anal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach to treatment with often complex interventions. Little is known regarding the associated costs and resource use.

Methods: Patient records were extracted from a national hospital database to estimate the number of patients treated for anal cancer in England. Identified resource use was linked to published UK cost estimates to quantify the reimbursement of treatment through the Payment by Results system. A mathematical model was developed simultaneously to validate findings and to calculate the average 10-year cost of treating a squamous cell anal carcinoma case from diagnosis. The model utilised data from the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland's anal cancer position statement.

Results: On average, 1,564 patients were admitted to hospital and 389 attended an outpatient facility per year. The average annual cost per inpatient and outpatient ranged from £4,562-£5,230 and £1,146-£1,335, respectively. Based on the model estimates, the inflated cost per case was between £16,470-£16,652. Results were most sensitive to the mode of admission for primary treatment and the costs of staging/diagnosis (inflated range: £14,309-£23,264).

Conclusions: Despite limitations in the available data, these results indicate that the cost of treating anal cancer is significant. Further observational work is required in order to verify these findings.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus