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Muscle glycogen metabolism changes in rats fed early postnatal a fructose-rich diet after maternal protein malnutrition: effects of acute physical exercise at the maximal lactate steady-state intensity.

Cambri LT, Ribeiro C, Botezelli JD, Ghezzi AC, Mello MA - Diabetol Metab Syndr (2014)

Bottom Line: The male offspring born of mothers fed on a balanced or low-protein diet were split in four groups until 60 days: Balanced (B): balanced diet during the whole period; Balanced/Fructose (BF): balanced diet in utero and fructose-rich diet after birth; Low protein/Balanced (LB): low-protein diet in utero and balanced diet after birth; Low protein/Fructose (LF): low protein diet in utero and fructose-rich diet after birth.There was no difference among the groups in the glucose uptake and oxidation rates in the isolated soleus muscle neither at rest nor after acute exercise.However, glycogen synthesis was higher in the LF muscle than in the others at rest.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: São Paulo State University (UNESP), Rio Claro, SP Brazil ; Federal University of Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiabá, MT, Brazil. Physical Education Department, UFMT, Av. Fernando Corrêa da Costa, 2367 - Boa Esperança, Cuiabá, Zip-Code:- 78060-900 MT Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: The objective was to evaluate the muscle glucose metabolism in rats fed a fructose-rich diet after fetal protein malnutrition, at rest and after acute physical exercise at maximal lactate steady-state intensity.

Methods: The male offspring born of mothers fed on a balanced or low-protein diet were split in four groups until 60 days: Balanced (B): balanced diet during the whole period; Balanced/Fructose (BF): balanced diet in utero and fructose-rich diet after birth; Low protein/Balanced (LB): low-protein diet in utero and balanced diet after birth; Low protein/Fructose (LF): low protein diet in utero and fructose-rich diet after birth.

Results: Acute physical exercise reduced the muscle glycogen concentrations in all groups, although the LF group showed higher concentrations at rest. There was no difference among the groups in the glucose uptake and oxidation rates in the isolated soleus muscle neither at rest nor after acute exercise. However, glycogen synthesis was higher in the LF muscle than in the others at rest. Acute physical exercise increased glycogen synthesis in all groups, and the LF group showed the highest values.

Conclusion: The fructose-rich diet administered in rats after fetal protein malnutrition alters muscle glycogen concentrations and glycogen synthesis in the rest and after acute exercise at maximal lactate steady-state intensity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Body weight of the rats from weaning (21 days) until the end of the experiment (60 days). Results are expressed as means ± standard deviation of 10 animals per group. B, balanced; BF, balanced–fructose; LB, low protein–balanced; LF: low protein–fructose. Different letters indicate a statistically significant difference (a#b#c#d) among groups (p <0.05).
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Fig2: Body weight of the rats from weaning (21 days) until the end of the experiment (60 days). Results are expressed as means ± standard deviation of 10 animals per group. B, balanced; BF, balanced–fructose; LB, low protein–balanced; LF: low protein–fructose. Different letters indicate a statistically significant difference (a#b#c#d) among groups (p <0.05).

Mentions: The diet adopted after birth (fructose-rich or balanced), but not in the fetal period (low protein or balanced) seems to have acute negative influence in the weight gain. Body weight in groups fed on fructose-rich diet (BF and LF) was smaller than groups fed on balanced diet (B and LB). Indeed, the body weight in those groups fed balanced diet during the nutritional recovery period (B and LB) was similar until 42 days, as the groups fed fructose-rich diet after birth (BF and LF) was similar until the same period. However, in long time (after 42 days), the interaction between diets in the fetal period and after birth exerted influence among all groups. After this point, BF group showed the lowest body weight when compared to other groups (Figure 2).Figure 2


Muscle glycogen metabolism changes in rats fed early postnatal a fructose-rich diet after maternal protein malnutrition: effects of acute physical exercise at the maximal lactate steady-state intensity.

Cambri LT, Ribeiro C, Botezelli JD, Ghezzi AC, Mello MA - Diabetol Metab Syndr (2014)

Body weight of the rats from weaning (21 days) until the end of the experiment (60 days). Results are expressed as means ± standard deviation of 10 animals per group. B, balanced; BF, balanced–fructose; LB, low protein–balanced; LF: low protein–fructose. Different letters indicate a statistically significant difference (a#b#c#d) among groups (p <0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232698&req=5

Fig2: Body weight of the rats from weaning (21 days) until the end of the experiment (60 days). Results are expressed as means ± standard deviation of 10 animals per group. B, balanced; BF, balanced–fructose; LB, low protein–balanced; LF: low protein–fructose. Different letters indicate a statistically significant difference (a#b#c#d) among groups (p <0.05).
Mentions: The diet adopted after birth (fructose-rich or balanced), but not in the fetal period (low protein or balanced) seems to have acute negative influence in the weight gain. Body weight in groups fed on fructose-rich diet (BF and LF) was smaller than groups fed on balanced diet (B and LB). Indeed, the body weight in those groups fed balanced diet during the nutritional recovery period (B and LB) was similar until 42 days, as the groups fed fructose-rich diet after birth (BF and LF) was similar until the same period. However, in long time (after 42 days), the interaction between diets in the fetal period and after birth exerted influence among all groups. After this point, BF group showed the lowest body weight when compared to other groups (Figure 2).Figure 2

Bottom Line: The male offspring born of mothers fed on a balanced or low-protein diet were split in four groups until 60 days: Balanced (B): balanced diet during the whole period; Balanced/Fructose (BF): balanced diet in utero and fructose-rich diet after birth; Low protein/Balanced (LB): low-protein diet in utero and balanced diet after birth; Low protein/Fructose (LF): low protein diet in utero and fructose-rich diet after birth.There was no difference among the groups in the glucose uptake and oxidation rates in the isolated soleus muscle neither at rest nor after acute exercise.However, glycogen synthesis was higher in the LF muscle than in the others at rest.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: São Paulo State University (UNESP), Rio Claro, SP Brazil ; Federal University of Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiabá, MT, Brazil. Physical Education Department, UFMT, Av. Fernando Corrêa da Costa, 2367 - Boa Esperança, Cuiabá, Zip-Code:- 78060-900 MT Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: The objective was to evaluate the muscle glucose metabolism in rats fed a fructose-rich diet after fetal protein malnutrition, at rest and after acute physical exercise at maximal lactate steady-state intensity.

Methods: The male offspring born of mothers fed on a balanced or low-protein diet were split in four groups until 60 days: Balanced (B): balanced diet during the whole period; Balanced/Fructose (BF): balanced diet in utero and fructose-rich diet after birth; Low protein/Balanced (LB): low-protein diet in utero and balanced diet after birth; Low protein/Fructose (LF): low protein diet in utero and fructose-rich diet after birth.

Results: Acute physical exercise reduced the muscle glycogen concentrations in all groups, although the LF group showed higher concentrations at rest. There was no difference among the groups in the glucose uptake and oxidation rates in the isolated soleus muscle neither at rest nor after acute exercise. However, glycogen synthesis was higher in the LF muscle than in the others at rest. Acute physical exercise increased glycogen synthesis in all groups, and the LF group showed the highest values.

Conclusion: The fructose-rich diet administered in rats after fetal protein malnutrition alters muscle glycogen concentrations and glycogen synthesis in the rest and after acute exercise at maximal lactate steady-state intensity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus