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Recent advances in hydrogen peroxide imaging for biological applications.

Guo H, Aleyasin H, Dickinson BC, Haskew-Layton RE, Ratan RR - Cell Biosci (2014)

Bottom Line: Therefore, the direct measurement of H2O2 in living specimens is critically important.Advances in H2O2 measurement have enabled biomedical scientists to study H2O2 biology at a level of precision previously unachievable.In addition, new imaging techniques such as two-photon microscopy (TPM) have been employed for H2O2 detection, which permit real-time measurements of H2O2 in vivo.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA ; Burke Medical Research Institute, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, White Plains, NY 10605 USA.

ABSTRACT
Mounting evidence supports the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in physiological signaling as well as pathological conditions. However, the subtleties of peroxide-mediated signaling are not well understood, in part because the generation, degradation, and diffusion of H2O2 are highly volatile within different cellular compartments. Therefore, the direct measurement of H2O2 in living specimens is critically important. Fluorescent probes that can detect small changes in H2O2 levels within relevant cellular compartments are important tools to study the spatial dynamics of H2O2. To achieve temporal resolution, the probes must also be photostable enough to allow multiple readings over time without loss of signal. Traditional fluorescent redox sensitive probes that have been commonly used for the detection of H2O2 tend to react with a wide variety of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and often suffer from photostablilty issues. Recently, new classes of H2O2 probes have been designed to detect H2O2 with high selectivity. Advances in H2O2 measurement have enabled biomedical scientists to study H2O2 biology at a level of precision previously unachievable. In addition, new imaging techniques such as two-photon microscopy (TPM) have been employed for H2O2 detection, which permit real-time measurements of H2O2 in vivo. This review focuses on recent advances in H2O2 probe development and optical imaging technologies that have been developed for biomedical applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fluorescence imaging of intracellular H2O2production using fluorescence probe PF6-AM (green). (A) Mechanism of Chemoselective H2O2 PF6-AM. (B) TPF imaging of H2O2 in astrocytes, fluorescence excited with a 770 nm Ti:sapphire laser. (C) Confocal microscopy of H2O2 in same astrocytes imaged in panel B, fluorescence excited with a 488 nm laser. The nuclei were stained with Hoechst 33342 (blue).
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Fig2: Fluorescence imaging of intracellular H2O2production using fluorescence probe PF6-AM (green). (A) Mechanism of Chemoselective H2O2 PF6-AM. (B) TPF imaging of H2O2 in astrocytes, fluorescence excited with a 770 nm Ti:sapphire laser. (C) Confocal microscopy of H2O2 in same astrocytes imaged in panel B, fluorescence excited with a 488 nm laser. The nuclei were stained with Hoechst 33342 (blue).

Mentions: TPM was demonstrated for imaging intracellular H2O2 production in live cells and tissues [25, 35, 50, 51]. Figure 2 shows TPM imaging of intracellular H2O2 in rat primary astrocytes using the chemoslective fluorescence probe PF6-AM. Figure 2A shows the H2O2 imaging mechanism of trappable probe PF6-AM [2]. Figure 2B shows TPM imaging of intracellular H2O2. As a comparison, Figure 2C shows confocal microscopy of the same cells using a 488 nm argon laser with the same fluorescence detection. Three arrows indicate strong light scattering in the same cells in Figure 2C. The TPM imaging here demonstrated the advantages of low scattering and low background noise.Figure 2


Recent advances in hydrogen peroxide imaging for biological applications.

Guo H, Aleyasin H, Dickinson BC, Haskew-Layton RE, Ratan RR - Cell Biosci (2014)

Fluorescence imaging of intracellular H2O2production using fluorescence probe PF6-AM (green). (A) Mechanism of Chemoselective H2O2 PF6-AM. (B) TPF imaging of H2O2 in astrocytes, fluorescence excited with a 770 nm Ti:sapphire laser. (C) Confocal microscopy of H2O2 in same astrocytes imaged in panel B, fluorescence excited with a 488 nm laser. The nuclei were stained with Hoechst 33342 (blue).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232666&req=5

Fig2: Fluorescence imaging of intracellular H2O2production using fluorescence probe PF6-AM (green). (A) Mechanism of Chemoselective H2O2 PF6-AM. (B) TPF imaging of H2O2 in astrocytes, fluorescence excited with a 770 nm Ti:sapphire laser. (C) Confocal microscopy of H2O2 in same astrocytes imaged in panel B, fluorescence excited with a 488 nm laser. The nuclei were stained with Hoechst 33342 (blue).
Mentions: TPM was demonstrated for imaging intracellular H2O2 production in live cells and tissues [25, 35, 50, 51]. Figure 2 shows TPM imaging of intracellular H2O2 in rat primary astrocytes using the chemoslective fluorescence probe PF6-AM. Figure 2A shows the H2O2 imaging mechanism of trappable probe PF6-AM [2]. Figure 2B shows TPM imaging of intracellular H2O2. As a comparison, Figure 2C shows confocal microscopy of the same cells using a 488 nm argon laser with the same fluorescence detection. Three arrows indicate strong light scattering in the same cells in Figure 2C. The TPM imaging here demonstrated the advantages of low scattering and low background noise.Figure 2

Bottom Line: Therefore, the direct measurement of H2O2 in living specimens is critically important.Advances in H2O2 measurement have enabled biomedical scientists to study H2O2 biology at a level of precision previously unachievable.In addition, new imaging techniques such as two-photon microscopy (TPM) have been employed for H2O2 detection, which permit real-time measurements of H2O2 in vivo.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA ; Burke Medical Research Institute, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, White Plains, NY 10605 USA.

ABSTRACT
Mounting evidence supports the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in physiological signaling as well as pathological conditions. However, the subtleties of peroxide-mediated signaling are not well understood, in part because the generation, degradation, and diffusion of H2O2 are highly volatile within different cellular compartments. Therefore, the direct measurement of H2O2 in living specimens is critically important. Fluorescent probes that can detect small changes in H2O2 levels within relevant cellular compartments are important tools to study the spatial dynamics of H2O2. To achieve temporal resolution, the probes must also be photostable enough to allow multiple readings over time without loss of signal. Traditional fluorescent redox sensitive probes that have been commonly used for the detection of H2O2 tend to react with a wide variety of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and often suffer from photostablilty issues. Recently, new classes of H2O2 probes have been designed to detect H2O2 with high selectivity. Advances in H2O2 measurement have enabled biomedical scientists to study H2O2 biology at a level of precision previously unachievable. In addition, new imaging techniques such as two-photon microscopy (TPM) have been employed for H2O2 detection, which permit real-time measurements of H2O2 in vivo. This review focuses on recent advances in H2O2 probe development and optical imaging technologies that have been developed for biomedical applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus