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Involvement of adiponectin in early stage of colorectal carcinogenesis.

Tae CH, Kim SE, Jung SA, Joo YH, Shim KN, Jung HK, Kim TH, Cho MS, Kim KH, Kim JS - BMC Cancer (2014)

Bottom Line: Although altered levels of adiponectin have been reported as a potential risk factor in colorectal cancer (CRC), the importance of the role played by adiponectin in colorectal carcinogenesis has not been established.AdipoRs expression was strong in normal epithelium, but weak to negative in the epithelia of CRC tissues.These findings offer new insight into understanding the relationship between adiponectin and colorectal carcinogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. kimse@ewha.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although altered levels of adiponectin have been reported as a potential risk factor in colorectal cancer (CRC), the importance of the role played by adiponectin in colorectal carcinogenesis has not been established. We sought to examine the expression pattern of adiponectin and adiponectin receptors (AdipoRs) in the normal-adenoma-carcinoma sequence and to assess the implications of adiponectin in colorectal carcinogenesis.

Methods: Serum adiponectin concentrations, and the mRNA and protein expression of adiponectin and AdipoRs were examined using serum and tissues from patients with CRC, advanced adenoma, and a normal colon. mRNA expression of AdipoRs and epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulators including E-cadherin, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and T-cadherin were examined in HCT116 cells treated with adiponectin.

Results: Serum adiponectin concentrations in patients with advanced adenoma and CRC were lower than those in controls. Adiponectin mRNA was not detected in colonic tissue, whereas AdipoRs mRNA was lower in advanced adenoma and CRC than that in normal colon tissues. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that adiponectin was expressed in spindle-shaped cells of the subepithelial layer in normal colon tissues, whereas ill-defined overexpression of adiponectin was seen in the stroma of advanced adenoma and CRC tissues. AdipoRs expression was strong in normal epithelium, but weak to negative in the epithelia of CRC tissues. Adiponectin downregulated COX-2 mRNA expression in vitro, but upregulated T-cadherin in HCT116 cells.

Conclusions: Systemic adiponectin and local AdipoRs expression in the colon may be associated with anti-tumorigenesis during the early stages of CRC. These findings offer new insight into understanding the relationship between adiponectin and colorectal carcinogenesis.

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Representative examples of AdipoR1 immunohistochemical staining with carcinoma in situ arising from advanced adenoma (×100).
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Fig5: Representative examples of AdipoR1 immunohistochemical staining with carcinoma in situ arising from advanced adenoma (×100).

Mentions: AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 expression by immunohistochemical staining were localized in the colon epithelium and was positive in all (100%) of the control and advanced adenoma tissues and in 62.8% and 88.5% of CRC tissues. The distribution and density of staining for AdipoRs decreased significantly in the order of normal to advanced adenoma to CRC tissues (Tables 2,3; Figure 3d–i). We confirmed these differences in AdipoR1 expression between advanced adenoma and CRC in nine patients with carcinoma in situ, which arose from advanced adenoma (p = 0.034, Wilcoxon’s signed-rank test), as shown in Additional file2 and Figure 5. No significant differences were observed in the relationship between AdipoRs staining and the clinicopathological characteristics of CRC such as differentiation, TNM stage, or tumor location.Table 2


Involvement of adiponectin in early stage of colorectal carcinogenesis.

Tae CH, Kim SE, Jung SA, Joo YH, Shim KN, Jung HK, Kim TH, Cho MS, Kim KH, Kim JS - BMC Cancer (2014)

Representative examples of AdipoR1 immunohistochemical staining with carcinoma in situ arising from advanced adenoma (×100).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232655&req=5

Fig5: Representative examples of AdipoR1 immunohistochemical staining with carcinoma in situ arising from advanced adenoma (×100).
Mentions: AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 expression by immunohistochemical staining were localized in the colon epithelium and was positive in all (100%) of the control and advanced adenoma tissues and in 62.8% and 88.5% of CRC tissues. The distribution and density of staining for AdipoRs decreased significantly in the order of normal to advanced adenoma to CRC tissues (Tables 2,3; Figure 3d–i). We confirmed these differences in AdipoR1 expression between advanced adenoma and CRC in nine patients with carcinoma in situ, which arose from advanced adenoma (p = 0.034, Wilcoxon’s signed-rank test), as shown in Additional file2 and Figure 5. No significant differences were observed in the relationship between AdipoRs staining and the clinicopathological characteristics of CRC such as differentiation, TNM stage, or tumor location.Table 2

Bottom Line: Although altered levels of adiponectin have been reported as a potential risk factor in colorectal cancer (CRC), the importance of the role played by adiponectin in colorectal carcinogenesis has not been established.AdipoRs expression was strong in normal epithelium, but weak to negative in the epithelia of CRC tissues.These findings offer new insight into understanding the relationship between adiponectin and colorectal carcinogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. kimse@ewha.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although altered levels of adiponectin have been reported as a potential risk factor in colorectal cancer (CRC), the importance of the role played by adiponectin in colorectal carcinogenesis has not been established. We sought to examine the expression pattern of adiponectin and adiponectin receptors (AdipoRs) in the normal-adenoma-carcinoma sequence and to assess the implications of adiponectin in colorectal carcinogenesis.

Methods: Serum adiponectin concentrations, and the mRNA and protein expression of adiponectin and AdipoRs were examined using serum and tissues from patients with CRC, advanced adenoma, and a normal colon. mRNA expression of AdipoRs and epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulators including E-cadherin, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and T-cadherin were examined in HCT116 cells treated with adiponectin.

Results: Serum adiponectin concentrations in patients with advanced adenoma and CRC were lower than those in controls. Adiponectin mRNA was not detected in colonic tissue, whereas AdipoRs mRNA was lower in advanced adenoma and CRC than that in normal colon tissues. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that adiponectin was expressed in spindle-shaped cells of the subepithelial layer in normal colon tissues, whereas ill-defined overexpression of adiponectin was seen in the stroma of advanced adenoma and CRC tissues. AdipoRs expression was strong in normal epithelium, but weak to negative in the epithelia of CRC tissues. Adiponectin downregulated COX-2 mRNA expression in vitro, but upregulated T-cadherin in HCT116 cells.

Conclusions: Systemic adiponectin and local AdipoRs expression in the colon may be associated with anti-tumorigenesis during the early stages of CRC. These findings offer new insight into understanding the relationship between adiponectin and colorectal carcinogenesis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus