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Grey and white matter correlates of recent and remote autobiographical memory retrieval--insights from the dementias.

Irish M, Hornberger M, El Wahsh S, Lam BY, Lah S, Miller L, Hsieh S, Hodges JR, Piguet O - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: All patient groups displayed significant remote memory impairments relative to Controls.The integrity of the anterior temporal cortices was related to the retrieval of remote memories, whereas the posterior cingulate cortex emerged as a structure significantly associated with recent autobiographical memory retrieval.Our findings demonstrate the importance of core brain structures, including the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, irrespective of time period, and point towards the contribution of discrete regions in mediating successful retrieval of distant versus recently experienced events.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Neuroscience Research Australia, Randwick, Sydney, Australia; Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, Sydney, Australia.

ABSTRACT
The capacity to remember self-referential past events relies on the integrity of a distributed neural network. Controversy exists, however, regarding the involvement of specific brain structures for the retrieval of recently experienced versus more distant events. Here, we explored how characteristic patterns of atrophy in neurodegenerative disorders differentially disrupt remote versus recent autobiographical memory. Eleven behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia, 10 semantic dementia, 15 Alzheimer's disease patients and 14 healthy older Controls completed the Autobiographical Interview. All patient groups displayed significant remote memory impairments relative to Controls. Similarly, recent period retrieval was significantly compromised in behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease, yet semantic dementia patients scored in line with Controls. Voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging analyses, for all participants combined, were conducted to investigate grey and white matter correlates of remote and recent autobiographical memory retrieval. Neural correlates common to both recent and remote time periods were identified, including the hippocampus, medial prefrontal, and frontopolar cortices, and the forceps minor and left hippocampal portion of the cingulum bundle. Regions exclusively implicated in each time period were also identified. The integrity of the anterior temporal cortices was related to the retrieval of remote memories, whereas the posterior cingulate cortex emerged as a structure significantly associated with recent autobiographical memory retrieval. This study represents the first investigation of the grey and white matter correlates of remote and recent autobiographical memory retrieval in neurodegenerative disorders. Our findings demonstrate the importance of core brain structures, including the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, irrespective of time period, and point towards the contribution of discrete regions in mediating successful retrieval of distant versus recently experienced events.

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Total internal (episodic) details retrieved across remote and recent periods on the Autobiographical Interview.Error bars represent the standard error of the mean. * p<.05; ** p = .001; n/s = non-significant. Group differences refer to contrasts between patient groups and Controls. No significant differences were evident between the patient groups for remote or recent retrieval.
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pone-0113081-g001: Total internal (episodic) details retrieved across remote and recent periods on the Autobiographical Interview.Error bars represent the standard error of the mean. * p<.05; ** p = .001; n/s = non-significant. Group differences refer to contrasts between patient groups and Controls. No significant differences were evident between the patient groups for remote or recent retrieval.

Mentions: Figure 1 illustrates overall performance under high retrieval support (Probed Recall) across recent and remote time periods on the Autobiographical Interview for all participant groups. A repeated measures MANCOVA revealed that for overall internal details, a significant main effect of Group was evident (F(3, 45) = 8.794, p<.0001). This group effect reflected the fact that Controls recalled significantly more internal details than all patient groups irrespective of epoch, (AD, p<.0001; bvFTD, p = .001; SD, p = .007).


Grey and white matter correlates of recent and remote autobiographical memory retrieval--insights from the dementias.

Irish M, Hornberger M, El Wahsh S, Lam BY, Lah S, Miller L, Hsieh S, Hodges JR, Piguet O - PLoS ONE (2014)

Total internal (episodic) details retrieved across remote and recent periods on the Autobiographical Interview.Error bars represent the standard error of the mean. * p<.05; ** p = .001; n/s = non-significant. Group differences refer to contrasts between patient groups and Controls. No significant differences were evident between the patient groups for remote or recent retrieval.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232597&req=5

pone-0113081-g001: Total internal (episodic) details retrieved across remote and recent periods on the Autobiographical Interview.Error bars represent the standard error of the mean. * p<.05; ** p = .001; n/s = non-significant. Group differences refer to contrasts between patient groups and Controls. No significant differences were evident between the patient groups for remote or recent retrieval.
Mentions: Figure 1 illustrates overall performance under high retrieval support (Probed Recall) across recent and remote time periods on the Autobiographical Interview for all participant groups. A repeated measures MANCOVA revealed that for overall internal details, a significant main effect of Group was evident (F(3, 45) = 8.794, p<.0001). This group effect reflected the fact that Controls recalled significantly more internal details than all patient groups irrespective of epoch, (AD, p<.0001; bvFTD, p = .001; SD, p = .007).

Bottom Line: All patient groups displayed significant remote memory impairments relative to Controls.The integrity of the anterior temporal cortices was related to the retrieval of remote memories, whereas the posterior cingulate cortex emerged as a structure significantly associated with recent autobiographical memory retrieval.Our findings demonstrate the importance of core brain structures, including the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, irrespective of time period, and point towards the contribution of discrete regions in mediating successful retrieval of distant versus recently experienced events.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Neuroscience Research Australia, Randwick, Sydney, Australia; Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, Sydney, Australia.

ABSTRACT
The capacity to remember self-referential past events relies on the integrity of a distributed neural network. Controversy exists, however, regarding the involvement of specific brain structures for the retrieval of recently experienced versus more distant events. Here, we explored how characteristic patterns of atrophy in neurodegenerative disorders differentially disrupt remote versus recent autobiographical memory. Eleven behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia, 10 semantic dementia, 15 Alzheimer's disease patients and 14 healthy older Controls completed the Autobiographical Interview. All patient groups displayed significant remote memory impairments relative to Controls. Similarly, recent period retrieval was significantly compromised in behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease, yet semantic dementia patients scored in line with Controls. Voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging analyses, for all participants combined, were conducted to investigate grey and white matter correlates of remote and recent autobiographical memory retrieval. Neural correlates common to both recent and remote time periods were identified, including the hippocampus, medial prefrontal, and frontopolar cortices, and the forceps minor and left hippocampal portion of the cingulum bundle. Regions exclusively implicated in each time period were also identified. The integrity of the anterior temporal cortices was related to the retrieval of remote memories, whereas the posterior cingulate cortex emerged as a structure significantly associated with recent autobiographical memory retrieval. This study represents the first investigation of the grey and white matter correlates of remote and recent autobiographical memory retrieval in neurodegenerative disorders. Our findings demonstrate the importance of core brain structures, including the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, irrespective of time period, and point towards the contribution of discrete regions in mediating successful retrieval of distant versus recently experienced events.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus