Limits...
Müllerian mimicry as a result of codivergence between velvet ants and spider wasps.

Rodriguez J, Pitts JP, von Dohlen CD, Wilson JS - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Psorthaspis spider wasps live in areas where this mimicry complex is found and are phenotypically similar to Dasymutilla.We inferred a dated phylogeny using nuclear molecular markers (28S, elongation factor 1-alpha, long-wavelength rhodopsin and wingless) for Psorthaspis species and compared it to a dated phylogeny of Dasymutilla.In addition, our tests indicate that Psorthaspis and Dasymutilla codiverged to produce similar color patterns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Recent studies have delineated a large Nearctic Müllerian mimicry complex in Dasymutilla velvet ants. Psorthaspis spider wasps live in areas where this mimicry complex is found and are phenotypically similar to Dasymutilla. We tested the idea that Psorthaspis spider wasps are participating in the Dasymutilla mimicry complex and that they codiverged with Dasymutilla. We performed morphometric analyses and human perception tests, and tabulated distributional records to determine the fit of Psorthaspis to the Dasymutilla mimicry complex. We inferred a dated phylogeny using nuclear molecular markers (28S, elongation factor 1-alpha, long-wavelength rhodopsin and wingless) for Psorthaspis species and compared it to a dated phylogeny of Dasymutilla. We tested for codivergence between the two groups using two statistical analyses. Our results show that Psorthaspis spider wasps are morphologically similar to the Dasymutilla mimicry rings. In addition, our tests indicate that Psorthaspis and Dasymutilla codiverged to produce similar color patterns. This study expands the breadth of the Dasymutilla Müllerian mimicry complex and provides insights about how codivergence influenced the evolution of mimicry in these groups.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Tanglegram of Psorthaspis (left topology) and Dasymutilla (right topology).Lines connect between members of the same mimicry rings in the two groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232588&req=5

pone-0112942-g003: Tanglegram of Psorthaspis (left topology) and Dasymutilla (right topology).Lines connect between members of the same mimicry rings in the two groups.

Mentions: While not tested directly in this study, our results suggest that coevolution played a role in the development of the large velvet ant and spider wasp mimicry complex. Several lines of evidence (i.e., morphological similarity, shared geographic distribution, codivergence) support this assertion. First, while it is not immediately evident from the topologies of the Dasymutilla and Psorthaspis phylogenies (Figure 3), statistical tests show evidence of codivergence between mimetic lineages of the two wasp families. This suggests that the evolution of mimicry between these wasp groups must have involved convergence at the genetic and phenotypic level, such as has been found for Neotropical butterflies [49], [50].


Müllerian mimicry as a result of codivergence between velvet ants and spider wasps.

Rodriguez J, Pitts JP, von Dohlen CD, Wilson JS - PLoS ONE (2014)

Tanglegram of Psorthaspis (left topology) and Dasymutilla (right topology).Lines connect between members of the same mimicry rings in the two groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232588&req=5

pone-0112942-g003: Tanglegram of Psorthaspis (left topology) and Dasymutilla (right topology).Lines connect between members of the same mimicry rings in the two groups.
Mentions: While not tested directly in this study, our results suggest that coevolution played a role in the development of the large velvet ant and spider wasp mimicry complex. Several lines of evidence (i.e., morphological similarity, shared geographic distribution, codivergence) support this assertion. First, while it is not immediately evident from the topologies of the Dasymutilla and Psorthaspis phylogenies (Figure 3), statistical tests show evidence of codivergence between mimetic lineages of the two wasp families. This suggests that the evolution of mimicry between these wasp groups must have involved convergence at the genetic and phenotypic level, such as has been found for Neotropical butterflies [49], [50].

Bottom Line: Psorthaspis spider wasps live in areas where this mimicry complex is found and are phenotypically similar to Dasymutilla.We inferred a dated phylogeny using nuclear molecular markers (28S, elongation factor 1-alpha, long-wavelength rhodopsin and wingless) for Psorthaspis species and compared it to a dated phylogeny of Dasymutilla.In addition, our tests indicate that Psorthaspis and Dasymutilla codiverged to produce similar color patterns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Recent studies have delineated a large Nearctic Müllerian mimicry complex in Dasymutilla velvet ants. Psorthaspis spider wasps live in areas where this mimicry complex is found and are phenotypically similar to Dasymutilla. We tested the idea that Psorthaspis spider wasps are participating in the Dasymutilla mimicry complex and that they codiverged with Dasymutilla. We performed morphometric analyses and human perception tests, and tabulated distributional records to determine the fit of Psorthaspis to the Dasymutilla mimicry complex. We inferred a dated phylogeny using nuclear molecular markers (28S, elongation factor 1-alpha, long-wavelength rhodopsin and wingless) for Psorthaspis species and compared it to a dated phylogeny of Dasymutilla. We tested for codivergence between the two groups using two statistical analyses. Our results show that Psorthaspis spider wasps are morphologically similar to the Dasymutilla mimicry rings. In addition, our tests indicate that Psorthaspis and Dasymutilla codiverged to produce similar color patterns. This study expands the breadth of the Dasymutilla Müllerian mimicry complex and provides insights about how codivergence influenced the evolution of mimicry in these groups.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus