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Are breaks in daily self-weighing associated with weight gain?

Helander EE, Vuorinen AL, Wansink B, Korhonen IK - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: However, an individual's self-weighing frequency typically varies over time.The relationship between temporal weighing frequency and corresponding weight change was studied primarily using a linear mixed effects model.Weight change between consecutive weight measurements was associated with the corresponding time difference (β = 0.021% per day, p<0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Signal Processing, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.

ABSTRACT
Regular self-weighing is linked to successful weight loss and maintenance. However, an individual's self-weighing frequency typically varies over time. This study examined temporal associations between time differences of consecutive weight measurements and the corresponding weight changes by analysing longitudinal self-weighing data, including 2,838 weight observations from 40 individuals attending a health-promoting programme. The relationship between temporal weighing frequency and corresponding weight change was studied primarily using a linear mixed effects model. Weight change between consecutive weight measurements was associated with the corresponding time difference (β = 0.021% per day, p<0.001). Weight loss took place during periods of daily self-weighing, whereas breaks longer than one month posed a risk of weight gain. The findings emphasize that missing data in weight management studies with a weight-monitoring component may be associated with non-adherence to the weight loss programme and an early sign of weight gain.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Self-weighing patterns in time as a number of subjects involved in weight-monitoring and the number of weekly weight measurements.The left y axis (red) corresponds to the number of participants that is still involved in self-monitoring and the red line shows the participant numbers for each week since starting the self-monitoring. The right y axis (black) corresponds to the number of measurements per week. Black dashed and solid lines show the weekly self-monitoring frequency average from two subgroups: subjects that are still actively self-monitoring (dashed line) and all study subjects (solid line).
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pone-0113164-g001: Self-weighing patterns in time as a number of subjects involved in weight-monitoring and the number of weekly weight measurements.The left y axis (red) corresponds to the number of participants that is still involved in self-monitoring and the red line shows the participant numbers for each week since starting the self-monitoring. The right y axis (black) corresponds to the number of measurements per week. Black dashed and solid lines show the weekly self-monitoring frequency average from two subgroups: subjects that are still actively self-monitoring (dashed line) and all study subjects (solid line).

Mentions: Figure 1 illustrates self-weighing patterns in time by showing the number of subjects still carrying out weight monitoring and the average number of weight measurements on a weekly basis over the monitoring weeks. Two people continued self-monitoring after 52 weeks, which is not shown in the figure. The adherence to frequent self-weighing decreases over time.


Are breaks in daily self-weighing associated with weight gain?

Helander EE, Vuorinen AL, Wansink B, Korhonen IK - PLoS ONE (2014)

Self-weighing patterns in time as a number of subjects involved in weight-monitoring and the number of weekly weight measurements.The left y axis (red) corresponds to the number of participants that is still involved in self-monitoring and the red line shows the participant numbers for each week since starting the self-monitoring. The right y axis (black) corresponds to the number of measurements per week. Black dashed and solid lines show the weekly self-monitoring frequency average from two subgroups: subjects that are still actively self-monitoring (dashed line) and all study subjects (solid line).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232563&req=5

pone-0113164-g001: Self-weighing patterns in time as a number of subjects involved in weight-monitoring and the number of weekly weight measurements.The left y axis (red) corresponds to the number of participants that is still involved in self-monitoring and the red line shows the participant numbers for each week since starting the self-monitoring. The right y axis (black) corresponds to the number of measurements per week. Black dashed and solid lines show the weekly self-monitoring frequency average from two subgroups: subjects that are still actively self-monitoring (dashed line) and all study subjects (solid line).
Mentions: Figure 1 illustrates self-weighing patterns in time by showing the number of subjects still carrying out weight monitoring and the average number of weight measurements on a weekly basis over the monitoring weeks. Two people continued self-monitoring after 52 weeks, which is not shown in the figure. The adherence to frequent self-weighing decreases over time.

Bottom Line: However, an individual's self-weighing frequency typically varies over time.The relationship between temporal weighing frequency and corresponding weight change was studied primarily using a linear mixed effects model.Weight change between consecutive weight measurements was associated with the corresponding time difference (β = 0.021% per day, p<0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Signal Processing, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.

ABSTRACT
Regular self-weighing is linked to successful weight loss and maintenance. However, an individual's self-weighing frequency typically varies over time. This study examined temporal associations between time differences of consecutive weight measurements and the corresponding weight changes by analysing longitudinal self-weighing data, including 2,838 weight observations from 40 individuals attending a health-promoting programme. The relationship between temporal weighing frequency and corresponding weight change was studied primarily using a linear mixed effects model. Weight change between consecutive weight measurements was associated with the corresponding time difference (β = 0.021% per day, p<0.001). Weight loss took place during periods of daily self-weighing, whereas breaks longer than one month posed a risk of weight gain. The findings emphasize that missing data in weight management studies with a weight-monitoring component may be associated with non-adherence to the weight loss programme and an early sign of weight gain.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus