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Transvection-based gene regulation in Drosophila is a complex and plastic trait.

Bing X, Rzezniczak TZ, Bateman JR, Merritt TJ - G3 (Bethesda) (2014)

Bottom Line: We further show that the magnitude of transvection at the Men locus is modified by both genetic background and environment (temperature), demonstrating that transvection is a plastic phenotype.Our results suggest that transvection effects in D. melanogaster are shaped by a dynamic interplay between environment and genetic background.Interestingly, we find that cis-based regulation of the Men gene is more robust to genetic background and environment than trans-based.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, P3E 2C6, Canada.

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Change in environment (temperature) reduces transvection at Men. (A) Mean ± root mean square error MEN activity of all genotypes, all MenExi alleles, across five genetic backgrounds, from each holding temperature: 25° (control; blue bars), 21° (yellow bars), 29° (red bars). Both 21C and 29° groups are significantly lower than the 25° group; see text for exact P values. (B) Mean ± SE MEN activity of MenExi allele heterozygotes across five genetic backgrounds from flies held at 25°, 21°, and 29°. Asterisks indicate groups that were significantly different according to Tukey’s honestly significant difference test (F10,2288= 1.775, P < 0.001, Tukey’s honestly significant difference P < 0.05). Note that only MenExi− allele heterozygotes (boxed by red dotted line) show significant differences in MEN activity across holding temperatures.
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fig3: Change in environment (temperature) reduces transvection at Men. (A) Mean ± root mean square error MEN activity of all genotypes, all MenExi alleles, across five genetic backgrounds, from each holding temperature: 25° (control; blue bars), 21° (yellow bars), 29° (red bars). Both 21C and 29° groups are significantly lower than the 25° group; see text for exact P values. (B) Mean ± SE MEN activity of MenExi allele heterozygotes across five genetic backgrounds from flies held at 25°, 21°, and 29°. Asterisks indicate groups that were significantly different according to Tukey’s honestly significant difference test (F10,2288= 1.775, P < 0.001, Tukey’s honestly significant difference P < 0.05). Note that only MenExi− allele heterozygotes (boxed by red dotted line) show significant differences in MEN activity across holding temperatures.

Mentions: Overall transvection, up-regulation of MEN, was reduced by a change in adult environment. MEN activity was significantly lower in the MenExi− heterozygotes moved to experimental temperatures (F2,2288= 46.998, P < 0.0001; Figure 3A; Table S3). When examined separately (Figure 3B), MEN activity for each MenExi− allele was also generally greater in the 25C flies than either experimental treatment. In contrast, exposure temperatures did not impact MEN activity in the MenEx3+ heterozygotes (Figure 3B, far left columns). MEN activity in the MenEx3+ heterozygotes, with intact promoters at both homologous loci, is likely predominantly regulated by cis-interactions, through “cis-preference” (Geyer et al. 1990; Figure 1D), while MEN activity in the MenExi− heterozygotes is likely a function of both cis- and trans-effects (Lum and Merritt 2011). The contrast in results between MenExi− heterozygotes and MenExi− heterozygotes suggest that trans-, but not cis-, based regulation of MEN is sensitive to changes in the environment. We are not suggesting that MEN activity does not respond to changes in temperature, but that the cis- and trans- components of the regulation of the Men gene appear to respond to changes in thermal environment differently.


Transvection-based gene regulation in Drosophila is a complex and plastic trait.

Bing X, Rzezniczak TZ, Bateman JR, Merritt TJ - G3 (Bethesda) (2014)

Change in environment (temperature) reduces transvection at Men. (A) Mean ± root mean square error MEN activity of all genotypes, all MenExi alleles, across five genetic backgrounds, from each holding temperature: 25° (control; blue bars), 21° (yellow bars), 29° (red bars). Both 21C and 29° groups are significantly lower than the 25° group; see text for exact P values. (B) Mean ± SE MEN activity of MenExi allele heterozygotes across five genetic backgrounds from flies held at 25°, 21°, and 29°. Asterisks indicate groups that were significantly different according to Tukey’s honestly significant difference test (F10,2288= 1.775, P < 0.001, Tukey’s honestly significant difference P < 0.05). Note that only MenExi− allele heterozygotes (boxed by red dotted line) show significant differences in MEN activity across holding temperatures.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232543&req=5

fig3: Change in environment (temperature) reduces transvection at Men. (A) Mean ± root mean square error MEN activity of all genotypes, all MenExi alleles, across five genetic backgrounds, from each holding temperature: 25° (control; blue bars), 21° (yellow bars), 29° (red bars). Both 21C and 29° groups are significantly lower than the 25° group; see text for exact P values. (B) Mean ± SE MEN activity of MenExi allele heterozygotes across five genetic backgrounds from flies held at 25°, 21°, and 29°. Asterisks indicate groups that were significantly different according to Tukey’s honestly significant difference test (F10,2288= 1.775, P < 0.001, Tukey’s honestly significant difference P < 0.05). Note that only MenExi− allele heterozygotes (boxed by red dotted line) show significant differences in MEN activity across holding temperatures.
Mentions: Overall transvection, up-regulation of MEN, was reduced by a change in adult environment. MEN activity was significantly lower in the MenExi− heterozygotes moved to experimental temperatures (F2,2288= 46.998, P < 0.0001; Figure 3A; Table S3). When examined separately (Figure 3B), MEN activity for each MenExi− allele was also generally greater in the 25C flies than either experimental treatment. In contrast, exposure temperatures did not impact MEN activity in the MenEx3+ heterozygotes (Figure 3B, far left columns). MEN activity in the MenEx3+ heterozygotes, with intact promoters at both homologous loci, is likely predominantly regulated by cis-interactions, through “cis-preference” (Geyer et al. 1990; Figure 1D), while MEN activity in the MenExi− heterozygotes is likely a function of both cis- and trans-effects (Lum and Merritt 2011). The contrast in results between MenExi− heterozygotes and MenExi− heterozygotes suggest that trans-, but not cis-, based regulation of MEN is sensitive to changes in the environment. We are not suggesting that MEN activity does not respond to changes in temperature, but that the cis- and trans- components of the regulation of the Men gene appear to respond to changes in thermal environment differently.

Bottom Line: We further show that the magnitude of transvection at the Men locus is modified by both genetic background and environment (temperature), demonstrating that transvection is a plastic phenotype.Our results suggest that transvection effects in D. melanogaster are shaped by a dynamic interplay between environment and genetic background.Interestingly, we find that cis-based regulation of the Men gene is more robust to genetic background and environment than trans-based.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, P3E 2C6, Canada.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus