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Positive relationship between serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and visceral fat in a Chinese nondiabetic population.

Luo Y, Ma X, Shen Y, Hao Y, Hu Y, Xiao Y, Bao Y, Jia W - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: An increasing trend in serum LDL-c levels was found to accompany the increase in VFA (P for trend < 0.01).Within the same BMI category, subjects with abdominal obesity (VFA ≥ 80 cm2) had significantly higher LDL-c levels than those without abdominal obesity (VFA < 80 cm2) (P < 0.05).VFA was positively correlated with serum LDL-c levels in a nondiabetic Chinese population with normal blood pressure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital; Shanghai Clinical Center for Diabetes; Shanghai Key Clinical Center for Metabolic Disease; Shanghai Diabetes Institute; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Diabetes Mellitus, Shanghai 200233, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: It has been reported that obesity and serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) are important risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is recognized that regionalized adiposity has different cardiovascular risk, visceral versus subcutaneous, is a better predictor of CVD. However, the relationship between regionalized adiposity and LDL-c is unclear. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between visceral fat accumulation and serum LDL-c levels in a Chinese cohort.

Methods: A total of 1 538 subjects (539 men, 999 women; 20-75 years old) with normal glucose tolerance and blood pressure were recruited. All subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging to quantify visceral fat area (VFA) and subcutaneous fat area. Serum LDL-c levels were detected by direct assay method.

Results: Overweight/obese subjects (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m2) had significantly higher serum LDL-c levels than the lean subjects (BMI <25 kg/m2) (P < 0.01). An increasing trend in serum LDL-c levels was found to accompany the increase in VFA (P for trend < 0.01). Within the same BMI category, subjects with abdominal obesity (VFA ≥ 80 cm2) had significantly higher LDL-c levels than those without abdominal obesity (VFA < 80 cm2) (P < 0.05). Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that increased VFA was an independent risk factor for elevated LDL-c levels, not only in the entire study population (Standard β = 0.138; P < 0.01), but also when the study population was subdivided into men, premenopausal and postmenopausal women (Standard β = 0.117, 0.145, 0.090 respectively for men, premenopausal women, postmenopausal women; all P < 0.01).

Conclusions: VFA was positively correlated with serum LDL-c levels in a nondiabetic Chinese population with normal blood pressure.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Serum LDL-c and ApoB levels with different VFA levels in the same BMI categories.A: Within the same BMI category, serum LDL-c levels of subjects with VFA ≥80 cm2 were significantly higher than those with VFA <80 cm2 (P<0.01 in BMI <25 kg/m2; P<0.05 in BMI ≥25 kg/m2). B: Within the same BMI category, serum ApoB levels of subjects with increased visceral fat (VFA ≥80 cm2) were significantly higher than those with VFA <80 cm2 (all P<0.01).
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pone-0112715-g002: Serum LDL-c and ApoB levels with different VFA levels in the same BMI categories.A: Within the same BMI category, serum LDL-c levels of subjects with VFA ≥80 cm2 were significantly higher than those with VFA <80 cm2 (P<0.01 in BMI <25 kg/m2; P<0.05 in BMI ≥25 kg/m2). B: Within the same BMI category, serum ApoB levels of subjects with increased visceral fat (VFA ≥80 cm2) were significantly higher than those with VFA <80 cm2 (all P<0.01).

Mentions: To further evaluate how VFA levels were related to serum lipid and lipoprotein profiles, the lean and overweight/obese groups were subdivided based on the VFA cut-off point (VFA ≥80 cm2). In the lean group (BMI <25 kg/m2), subjects with a VFA ≥80 cm2 had significantly higher serum TC (5.09 [4.55–5.78] versus 4.92 [4.34–5.60] mmol/L; P<0.01), TG (1.46 [1.04–2.01] versus 0.96 [0.70–1.32] mmol/L; P<0.01), LDL-c (3.28 [2.77–3.75] versus 3.01 [2.49–3.59] mmol/L; P<0.01) (Figure 2A), ApoB (0.82 [0.72–0.92] versus 0.77 [0.66–0.88] g/L; P<0.01) (Figure 2 B) and lower serum HDL-c levels (1.31 [1.14–1.50] versus 1.57 [1.34–1.82] mmol/L; P<0.01) than the subjects with a BMI <25 kg/m2 and a VFA <80 cm2. We observed a similar trend in the overweight/obese group (BMI ≥25 kg/m2) subdivided for VFA. Overweight/obese subjects with a VFA ≥80 cm2 had significantly higher serum TC (5.03 [4.48–5.57] versus 4.70 [4.15–5.44] mmol/L; P<0.05), TG (1.48 [1.09–2.00] versus 1.11 [0.78–1.40] mmol/L; P<0.01), LDL-c (3.30 [2.84–3.76] versus 3.09 [2.57–3.66] mmol/L; P<0.05) (Figure 2 A), ApoB (0.82 [0.73–0.92] versus 0.76 [0.67–0.86] g/L; P<0.01) (Figure 2 B), and lower serum HDL-c levels (1.27 [1.10–1.49] versus 1.45 [1.21–1.70] mmol/L; P<0.01) than the overweight/obese subjects with a VFA <80 cm2. However, Lp(a) levels of subjects did not reach statistical significance between the VFA <80 cm2 subgroup and VFA ≥80 cm2 subgroup (P>0.05), not only in the BMI <25 kg/m2 group but also in the BMI ≥25 kg/m2 group.


Positive relationship between serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and visceral fat in a Chinese nondiabetic population.

Luo Y, Ma X, Shen Y, Hao Y, Hu Y, Xiao Y, Bao Y, Jia W - PLoS ONE (2014)

Serum LDL-c and ApoB levels with different VFA levels in the same BMI categories.A: Within the same BMI category, serum LDL-c levels of subjects with VFA ≥80 cm2 were significantly higher than those with VFA <80 cm2 (P<0.01 in BMI <25 kg/m2; P<0.05 in BMI ≥25 kg/m2). B: Within the same BMI category, serum ApoB levels of subjects with increased visceral fat (VFA ≥80 cm2) were significantly higher than those with VFA <80 cm2 (all P<0.01).
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pone-0112715-g002: Serum LDL-c and ApoB levels with different VFA levels in the same BMI categories.A: Within the same BMI category, serum LDL-c levels of subjects with VFA ≥80 cm2 were significantly higher than those with VFA <80 cm2 (P<0.01 in BMI <25 kg/m2; P<0.05 in BMI ≥25 kg/m2). B: Within the same BMI category, serum ApoB levels of subjects with increased visceral fat (VFA ≥80 cm2) were significantly higher than those with VFA <80 cm2 (all P<0.01).
Mentions: To further evaluate how VFA levels were related to serum lipid and lipoprotein profiles, the lean and overweight/obese groups were subdivided based on the VFA cut-off point (VFA ≥80 cm2). In the lean group (BMI <25 kg/m2), subjects with a VFA ≥80 cm2 had significantly higher serum TC (5.09 [4.55–5.78] versus 4.92 [4.34–5.60] mmol/L; P<0.01), TG (1.46 [1.04–2.01] versus 0.96 [0.70–1.32] mmol/L; P<0.01), LDL-c (3.28 [2.77–3.75] versus 3.01 [2.49–3.59] mmol/L; P<0.01) (Figure 2A), ApoB (0.82 [0.72–0.92] versus 0.77 [0.66–0.88] g/L; P<0.01) (Figure 2 B) and lower serum HDL-c levels (1.31 [1.14–1.50] versus 1.57 [1.34–1.82] mmol/L; P<0.01) than the subjects with a BMI <25 kg/m2 and a VFA <80 cm2. We observed a similar trend in the overweight/obese group (BMI ≥25 kg/m2) subdivided for VFA. Overweight/obese subjects with a VFA ≥80 cm2 had significantly higher serum TC (5.03 [4.48–5.57] versus 4.70 [4.15–5.44] mmol/L; P<0.05), TG (1.48 [1.09–2.00] versus 1.11 [0.78–1.40] mmol/L; P<0.01), LDL-c (3.30 [2.84–3.76] versus 3.09 [2.57–3.66] mmol/L; P<0.05) (Figure 2 A), ApoB (0.82 [0.73–0.92] versus 0.76 [0.67–0.86] g/L; P<0.01) (Figure 2 B), and lower serum HDL-c levels (1.27 [1.10–1.49] versus 1.45 [1.21–1.70] mmol/L; P<0.01) than the overweight/obese subjects with a VFA <80 cm2. However, Lp(a) levels of subjects did not reach statistical significance between the VFA <80 cm2 subgroup and VFA ≥80 cm2 subgroup (P>0.05), not only in the BMI <25 kg/m2 group but also in the BMI ≥25 kg/m2 group.

Bottom Line: An increasing trend in serum LDL-c levels was found to accompany the increase in VFA (P for trend < 0.01).Within the same BMI category, subjects with abdominal obesity (VFA ≥ 80 cm2) had significantly higher LDL-c levels than those without abdominal obesity (VFA < 80 cm2) (P < 0.05).VFA was positively correlated with serum LDL-c levels in a nondiabetic Chinese population with normal blood pressure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital; Shanghai Clinical Center for Diabetes; Shanghai Key Clinical Center for Metabolic Disease; Shanghai Diabetes Institute; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Diabetes Mellitus, Shanghai 200233, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: It has been reported that obesity and serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) are important risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is recognized that regionalized adiposity has different cardiovascular risk, visceral versus subcutaneous, is a better predictor of CVD. However, the relationship between regionalized adiposity and LDL-c is unclear. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between visceral fat accumulation and serum LDL-c levels in a Chinese cohort.

Methods: A total of 1 538 subjects (539 men, 999 women; 20-75 years old) with normal glucose tolerance and blood pressure were recruited. All subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging to quantify visceral fat area (VFA) and subcutaneous fat area. Serum LDL-c levels were detected by direct assay method.

Results: Overweight/obese subjects (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m2) had significantly higher serum LDL-c levels than the lean subjects (BMI <25 kg/m2) (P < 0.01). An increasing trend in serum LDL-c levels was found to accompany the increase in VFA (P for trend < 0.01). Within the same BMI category, subjects with abdominal obesity (VFA ≥ 80 cm2) had significantly higher LDL-c levels than those without abdominal obesity (VFA < 80 cm2) (P < 0.05). Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that increased VFA was an independent risk factor for elevated LDL-c levels, not only in the entire study population (Standard β = 0.138; P < 0.01), but also when the study population was subdivided into men, premenopausal and postmenopausal women (Standard β = 0.117, 0.145, 0.090 respectively for men, premenopausal women, postmenopausal women; all P < 0.01).

Conclusions: VFA was positively correlated with serum LDL-c levels in a nondiabetic Chinese population with normal blood pressure.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus