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Short-term visual deprivation, tactile acuity, and haptic solid shape discrimination.

Crabtree CE, Norman JF - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Previous psychophysical studies have reported conflicting results concerning the effects of short-term visual deprivation upon tactile acuity.The results of the current investigation demonstrate that not only does short-term visual deprivation not enhance tactile acuity, it additionally has no effect upon haptic 3-D shape discrimination.While visual deprivation had no effect in our study, there was a significant effect of experience and learning for the grating orientation task - the participants' tactile acuity improved over time, independent of whether they had, or had not, experienced visual deprivation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological Sciences, Ogden College of Science and Engineering, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Previous psychophysical studies have reported conflicting results concerning the effects of short-term visual deprivation upon tactile acuity. Some studies have found that 45 to 90 minutes of total light deprivation produce significant improvements in participants' tactile acuity as measured with a grating orientation discrimination task. In contrast, a single 2011 study found no such improvement while attempting to replicate these earlier findings. A primary goal of the current experiment was to resolve this discrepancy in the literature by evaluating the effects of a 90-minute period of total light deprivation upon tactile grating orientation discrimination. We also evaluated the potential effect of short-term deprivation upon haptic 3-D shape discrimination using a set of naturally-shaped solid objects. According to previous research, short-term deprivation enhances performance in a tactile 2-D shape discrimination task - perhaps a similar improvement also occurs for haptic 3-D shape discrimination. The results of the current investigation demonstrate that not only does short-term visual deprivation not enhance tactile acuity, it additionally has no effect upon haptic 3-D shape discrimination. While visual deprivation had no effect in our study, there was a significant effect of experience and learning for the grating orientation task - the participants' tactile acuity improved over time, independent of whether they had, or had not, experienced visual deprivation.

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A photograph of the eight natural objects (bell peppers, Capsicum annuum) used as experimental stimuli for the solid shape discrimination task.Starting from the bottom left (going clockwise), the objects depicted are 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 11, and 12. These objects are a subset of those developed by Norman et al. [30].
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pone-0112828-g001: A photograph of the eight natural objects (bell peppers, Capsicum annuum) used as experimental stimuli for the solid shape discrimination task.Starting from the bottom left (going clockwise), the objects depicted are 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 11, and 12. These objects are a subset of those developed by Norman et al. [30].

Mentions: The experimental stimuli for the tactile acuity task were tactile gratings (JVP Domes, Stoelting, Inc.), used previously by both our laboratory and others [13], [15], [24], [30]–[33]. The experimental stimuli used for the solid shape discrimination task were solid (plastic) copies of eight natural bell peppers, Capsicum annuum, that have been regularly used in previous investigations [13], [34]–[37]. Photographs of these stimulus objects are shown in Figure 1.


Short-term visual deprivation, tactile acuity, and haptic solid shape discrimination.

Crabtree CE, Norman JF - PLoS ONE (2014)

A photograph of the eight natural objects (bell peppers, Capsicum annuum) used as experimental stimuli for the solid shape discrimination task.Starting from the bottom left (going clockwise), the objects depicted are 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 11, and 12. These objects are a subset of those developed by Norman et al. [30].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232490&req=5

pone-0112828-g001: A photograph of the eight natural objects (bell peppers, Capsicum annuum) used as experimental stimuli for the solid shape discrimination task.Starting from the bottom left (going clockwise), the objects depicted are 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 11, and 12. These objects are a subset of those developed by Norman et al. [30].
Mentions: The experimental stimuli for the tactile acuity task were tactile gratings (JVP Domes, Stoelting, Inc.), used previously by both our laboratory and others [13], [15], [24], [30]–[33]. The experimental stimuli used for the solid shape discrimination task were solid (plastic) copies of eight natural bell peppers, Capsicum annuum, that have been regularly used in previous investigations [13], [34]–[37]. Photographs of these stimulus objects are shown in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Previous psychophysical studies have reported conflicting results concerning the effects of short-term visual deprivation upon tactile acuity.The results of the current investigation demonstrate that not only does short-term visual deprivation not enhance tactile acuity, it additionally has no effect upon haptic 3-D shape discrimination.While visual deprivation had no effect in our study, there was a significant effect of experience and learning for the grating orientation task - the participants' tactile acuity improved over time, independent of whether they had, or had not, experienced visual deprivation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological Sciences, Ogden College of Science and Engineering, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Previous psychophysical studies have reported conflicting results concerning the effects of short-term visual deprivation upon tactile acuity. Some studies have found that 45 to 90 minutes of total light deprivation produce significant improvements in participants' tactile acuity as measured with a grating orientation discrimination task. In contrast, a single 2011 study found no such improvement while attempting to replicate these earlier findings. A primary goal of the current experiment was to resolve this discrepancy in the literature by evaluating the effects of a 90-minute period of total light deprivation upon tactile grating orientation discrimination. We also evaluated the potential effect of short-term deprivation upon haptic 3-D shape discrimination using a set of naturally-shaped solid objects. According to previous research, short-term deprivation enhances performance in a tactile 2-D shape discrimination task - perhaps a similar improvement also occurs for haptic 3-D shape discrimination. The results of the current investigation demonstrate that not only does short-term visual deprivation not enhance tactile acuity, it additionally has no effect upon haptic 3-D shape discrimination. While visual deprivation had no effect in our study, there was a significant effect of experience and learning for the grating orientation task - the participants' tactile acuity improved over time, independent of whether they had, or had not, experienced visual deprivation.

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