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Comparative genomic analysis shows that avian pathogenic Escherichia coli isolate IMT5155 (O2:K1:H5; ST complex 95, ST140) shares close relationship with ST95 APEC O1:K1 and human ExPEC O18:K1 strains.

Zhu Ge X, Jiang J, Pan Z, Hu L, Wang S, Wang H, Leung FC, Dai J, Fan H - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, the unique PAI I5155 (GI-12) was identified and found to be conserved in APEC O2 serotype isolates.The distribution analysis of 10 sequenced ExPEC pan-genome virulence factors among 47 sequenced E. coli strains provided meaningful information for B2 APEC/ExPEC-specific virulence factors, including several adhesins, invasins, toxins, iron acquisition systems, and so on.The pathogenicity tests of IMT5155 and other APEC O1:K1 and O2:K1 serotypes strains (isolated in China) through four animal models showed that they were highly virulent for avian colisepticemia and able to cause septicemia and meningitis in neonatal rats, suggesting zoonotic potential of these APEC O1:K1 and O2:K1 isolates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT
Avian pathogenic E. coli and human extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli serotypes O1, O2 and O18 strains isolated from different hosts are generally located in phylogroup B2 and ST complex 95, and they share similar genetic characteristics and pathogenicity, with no or minimal host specificity. They are popular objects for the study of ExPEC genetic characteristics and pathogenesis in recent years. Here, we investigated the evolution and genetic blueprint of APEC pathotype by performing phylogenetic and comparative genome analysis of avian pathogenic E. coli strain IMT5155 (O2:K1:H5; ST complex 95, ST140) with other E. coli pathotypes. Phylogeny analyses indicated that IMT5155 has closest evolutionary relationship with APEC O1, IHE3034, and UTI89. Comparative genomic analysis showed that IMT5155 and APEC O1 shared significant genetic overlap/similarities with human ExPEC dominant O18:K1 strains (IHE3034 and UTI89). Furthermore, the unique PAI I5155 (GI-12) was identified and found to be conserved in APEC O2 serotype isolates. GI-7 and GI-16 encoding two typical T6SSs in IMT5155 might be useful markers for the identification of ExPEC dominant serotypes (O1, O2, and O18) strains. IMT5155 contained a ColV plasmid p1ColV5155, which defined the APEC pathotype. The distribution analysis of 10 sequenced ExPEC pan-genome virulence factors among 47 sequenced E. coli strains provided meaningful information for B2 APEC/ExPEC-specific virulence factors, including several adhesins, invasins, toxins, iron acquisition systems, and so on. The pathogenicity tests of IMT5155 and other APEC O1:K1 and O2:K1 serotypes strains (isolated in China) through four animal models showed that they were highly virulent for avian colisepticemia and able to cause septicemia and meningitis in neonatal rats, suggesting zoonotic potential of these APEC O1:K1 and O2:K1 isolates.

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The distribution diagram of 10 sequenced B2 ExPEC pan-genome virulence genes among 46 E. coli strains.The uppermost row showed six classified clusters: 1, adhesins, green; 2, invasins, magenta; 3, iron acquisition/transport systems, blue; 4, polysialic acid synthesis, aquamarine; 5, toxins, purple; 6, others, darksalmon. Right side of the vertical line showed E. coli strains that were consistent with phylogenetic tree (Figure 1). The red and black body showed distribution of virulence genes among these strains. A red line meant that the virulence gene of interest was present at a particular strain, while a black line implied the gene was absent.
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pone-0112048-g005: The distribution diagram of 10 sequenced B2 ExPEC pan-genome virulence genes among 46 E. coli strains.The uppermost row showed six classified clusters: 1, adhesins, green; 2, invasins, magenta; 3, iron acquisition/transport systems, blue; 4, polysialic acid synthesis, aquamarine; 5, toxins, purple; 6, others, darksalmon. Right side of the vertical line showed E. coli strains that were consistent with phylogenetic tree (Figure 1). The red and black body showed distribution of virulence genes among these strains. A red line meant that the virulence gene of interest was present at a particular strain, while a black line implied the gene was absent.

Mentions: In order to understand the relationship between virulence factors and genetic landscape of B2 ExPEC pathotypes, the distribution of 10 sequenced B2 ExPEC pan-genome virulence genes among 46 sequenced E. coli strains was conducted to examine whether B2 ExPEC strains harbored typical ExPEC-specific virulence factors (i.e., determining whether there were significant differences for the distribution of B2 ExPEC virulence genes among different E. coli pathotypes) [51]. The pan-genome of sequenced 10 B2 ExPEC strains contained 10,399 orhthologous gene families. The VFDB database predicted 287 virulence genes among these orhthologous genes. 73 virulence-associated genes were manually confirmed among these 287 virulence genes and classified as six categories: adhesins, invasins, toxins, iron acquisition/transport systems, polysialic acid synthesis, and other virulence genes. The details of 73 virulence genes of 10 sequenced B2 ExPEC pan-genome and their distributions among 46 sequenced strains were shown in Figure 5 and Table B in File S2. The distribution diagram showed that 10 sequenced B2 ExPEC pan-genome virulence genes were significant occurring in extraintestinal pathogenic strains compared with commensal and diarrhoeagenic E. coli, and several virulence genes were only present among ExPEC strains, such as fimbrial adhesins (yqi, auf, and papG), invasins (ibeA and Hcp), almost of toxins, and others (Figure 5 and Table B in File S2). The distribution of 10 sequenced B2 ExPEC pan-genome virulence factors provided a meaningful information for ExPEC-specific virulence factors, including several adhesins, invasions, toxins, iron acquisition systems, and others (Figure 5 and Table B in File S2), which were conserved in ExPEC pathotypes and contributed to ExPEC to adapte/colonize extraintestinal specific niches during infection. Moreover, these specific virulence factors might also provide valuable targets for the vaccines design.


Comparative genomic analysis shows that avian pathogenic Escherichia coli isolate IMT5155 (O2:K1:H5; ST complex 95, ST140) shares close relationship with ST95 APEC O1:K1 and human ExPEC O18:K1 strains.

Zhu Ge X, Jiang J, Pan Z, Hu L, Wang S, Wang H, Leung FC, Dai J, Fan H - PLoS ONE (2014)

The distribution diagram of 10 sequenced B2 ExPEC pan-genome virulence genes among 46 E. coli strains.The uppermost row showed six classified clusters: 1, adhesins, green; 2, invasins, magenta; 3, iron acquisition/transport systems, blue; 4, polysialic acid synthesis, aquamarine; 5, toxins, purple; 6, others, darksalmon. Right side of the vertical line showed E. coli strains that were consistent with phylogenetic tree (Figure 1). The red and black body showed distribution of virulence genes among these strains. A red line meant that the virulence gene of interest was present at a particular strain, while a black line implied the gene was absent.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232414&req=5

pone-0112048-g005: The distribution diagram of 10 sequenced B2 ExPEC pan-genome virulence genes among 46 E. coli strains.The uppermost row showed six classified clusters: 1, adhesins, green; 2, invasins, magenta; 3, iron acquisition/transport systems, blue; 4, polysialic acid synthesis, aquamarine; 5, toxins, purple; 6, others, darksalmon. Right side of the vertical line showed E. coli strains that were consistent with phylogenetic tree (Figure 1). The red and black body showed distribution of virulence genes among these strains. A red line meant that the virulence gene of interest was present at a particular strain, while a black line implied the gene was absent.
Mentions: In order to understand the relationship between virulence factors and genetic landscape of B2 ExPEC pathotypes, the distribution of 10 sequenced B2 ExPEC pan-genome virulence genes among 46 sequenced E. coli strains was conducted to examine whether B2 ExPEC strains harbored typical ExPEC-specific virulence factors (i.e., determining whether there were significant differences for the distribution of B2 ExPEC virulence genes among different E. coli pathotypes) [51]. The pan-genome of sequenced 10 B2 ExPEC strains contained 10,399 orhthologous gene families. The VFDB database predicted 287 virulence genes among these orhthologous genes. 73 virulence-associated genes were manually confirmed among these 287 virulence genes and classified as six categories: adhesins, invasins, toxins, iron acquisition/transport systems, polysialic acid synthesis, and other virulence genes. The details of 73 virulence genes of 10 sequenced B2 ExPEC pan-genome and their distributions among 46 sequenced strains were shown in Figure 5 and Table B in File S2. The distribution diagram showed that 10 sequenced B2 ExPEC pan-genome virulence genes were significant occurring in extraintestinal pathogenic strains compared with commensal and diarrhoeagenic E. coli, and several virulence genes were only present among ExPEC strains, such as fimbrial adhesins (yqi, auf, and papG), invasins (ibeA and Hcp), almost of toxins, and others (Figure 5 and Table B in File S2). The distribution of 10 sequenced B2 ExPEC pan-genome virulence factors provided a meaningful information for ExPEC-specific virulence factors, including several adhesins, invasions, toxins, iron acquisition systems, and others (Figure 5 and Table B in File S2), which were conserved in ExPEC pathotypes and contributed to ExPEC to adapte/colonize extraintestinal specific niches during infection. Moreover, these specific virulence factors might also provide valuable targets for the vaccines design.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, the unique PAI I5155 (GI-12) was identified and found to be conserved in APEC O2 serotype isolates.The distribution analysis of 10 sequenced ExPEC pan-genome virulence factors among 47 sequenced E. coli strains provided meaningful information for B2 APEC/ExPEC-specific virulence factors, including several adhesins, invasins, toxins, iron acquisition systems, and so on.The pathogenicity tests of IMT5155 and other APEC O1:K1 and O2:K1 serotypes strains (isolated in China) through four animal models showed that they were highly virulent for avian colisepticemia and able to cause septicemia and meningitis in neonatal rats, suggesting zoonotic potential of these APEC O1:K1 and O2:K1 isolates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT
Avian pathogenic E. coli and human extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli serotypes O1, O2 and O18 strains isolated from different hosts are generally located in phylogroup B2 and ST complex 95, and they share similar genetic characteristics and pathogenicity, with no or minimal host specificity. They are popular objects for the study of ExPEC genetic characteristics and pathogenesis in recent years. Here, we investigated the evolution and genetic blueprint of APEC pathotype by performing phylogenetic and comparative genome analysis of avian pathogenic E. coli strain IMT5155 (O2:K1:H5; ST complex 95, ST140) with other E. coli pathotypes. Phylogeny analyses indicated that IMT5155 has closest evolutionary relationship with APEC O1, IHE3034, and UTI89. Comparative genomic analysis showed that IMT5155 and APEC O1 shared significant genetic overlap/similarities with human ExPEC dominant O18:K1 strains (IHE3034 and UTI89). Furthermore, the unique PAI I5155 (GI-12) was identified and found to be conserved in APEC O2 serotype isolates. GI-7 and GI-16 encoding two typical T6SSs in IMT5155 might be useful markers for the identification of ExPEC dominant serotypes (O1, O2, and O18) strains. IMT5155 contained a ColV plasmid p1ColV5155, which defined the APEC pathotype. The distribution analysis of 10 sequenced ExPEC pan-genome virulence factors among 47 sequenced E. coli strains provided meaningful information for B2 APEC/ExPEC-specific virulence factors, including several adhesins, invasins, toxins, iron acquisition systems, and so on. The pathogenicity tests of IMT5155 and other APEC O1:K1 and O2:K1 serotypes strains (isolated in China) through four animal models showed that they were highly virulent for avian colisepticemia and able to cause septicemia and meningitis in neonatal rats, suggesting zoonotic potential of these APEC O1:K1 and O2:K1 isolates.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus