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Characterization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus communities of Aquilaria crassna and Tectona grandis roots and soils in Thailand plantations.

Chaiyasen A, Young JP, Teaumroong N, Gavinlertvatana P, Lumyong S - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: A total of 38 distinct terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) were found, 31 of which were shared between A. crassna and T. grandis.The Glomeraceae were found to be common in all study sites.Future inoculum production and utilization efforts can be directed toward the identified symbiotic associates of these valuable tree species to enhance reforestation efforts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

ABSTRACT
Aquilaria crassna Pierre ex Lec. and Tectona grandis Linn.f. are sources of resin-suffused agarwood and teak timber, respectively. This study investigated arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus community structure in roots and rhizosphere soils of A. crassna and T. grandis from plantations in Thailand to understand whether AM fungal communities present in roots and rhizosphere soils vary with host plant species and study sites. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism complemented with clone libraries revealed that AM fungal community composition in A. crassna and T. grandis were similar. A total of 38 distinct terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) were found, 31 of which were shared between A. crassna and T. grandis. AM fungal communities in T. grandis samples from different sites were similar, as were those in A. crassna. The estimated average minimum numbers of AM fungal taxa per sample in roots and soils of T. grandis were at least 1.89 vs. 2.55, respectively, and those of A. crassna were 2.85 vs. 2.33 respectively. The TRFs were attributed to Claroideoglomeraceae, Diversisporaceae, Gigasporaceae and Glomeraceae. The Glomeraceae were found to be common in all study sites. Specific AM taxa in roots and soils of T. grandis and A. crassna were not affected by host plant species and sample source (root vs. soil) but affected by collecting site. Future inoculum production and utilization efforts can be directed toward the identified symbiotic associates of these valuable tree species to enhance reforestation efforts.

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Neighbour-joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree of partial small subunit rRNA gene.Phylogeny was constructed using the region from NS31 to AML3. The percentage support values are based on 1000 bootstraps.
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pone-0112591-g004: Neighbour-joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree of partial small subunit rRNA gene.Phylogeny was constructed using the region from NS31 to AML3. The percentage support values are based on 1000 bootstraps.

Mentions: Our phylogenetic analysis was based on the new classification of Krüger et al. [44]. The 32 clone sequences were aligned with 23 sequences identified as closely related reference sequences in GenBank and a phylogenetic tree was constructed using the 18S rRNA gene sequences of Paraglomus occultum (GenBank accessions AJ276081 and JN687477) as outgroup. This indicated the presence of five AM fungal clades belonging to the families Claroideoglomeraceae, Diversisporaceae, Gigasporaceae, and Glomeraceae (Figure 4), the most frequent sequences corresponding to Glomeraceae. The subclusters contained close matches to taxa previously identified by Singh et al. [22] based on spore morphology of AM fungi in rhizosphere soils of T. grandis: TR1-16, TR1-43, TS4-4, AR5-7 and TS6-1 are close to Rhizophagus intraradices or R. irregularis, while TR1-27 is close to Redeckera fulvum. Clone sequences TS4-9 and TS4-32 are similar to Diversispora aurantia, while TR3-R10 is probably Gigaspora margarita. When sequence data are compared with individual TRFs (Table S3 and Figure 4), it is clear that individual TRFs cannot be used to identify sequence type, because many different species may generate a TRF of the same size. For example, the FAM fragment at 164b could equally well be from G. indicum, Re. fulvum or Claroideoglomus etunicatum.


Characterization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus communities of Aquilaria crassna and Tectona grandis roots and soils in Thailand plantations.

Chaiyasen A, Young JP, Teaumroong N, Gavinlertvatana P, Lumyong S - PLoS ONE (2014)

Neighbour-joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree of partial small subunit rRNA gene.Phylogeny was constructed using the region from NS31 to AML3. The percentage support values are based on 1000 bootstraps.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232412&req=5

pone-0112591-g004: Neighbour-joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree of partial small subunit rRNA gene.Phylogeny was constructed using the region from NS31 to AML3. The percentage support values are based on 1000 bootstraps.
Mentions: Our phylogenetic analysis was based on the new classification of Krüger et al. [44]. The 32 clone sequences were aligned with 23 sequences identified as closely related reference sequences in GenBank and a phylogenetic tree was constructed using the 18S rRNA gene sequences of Paraglomus occultum (GenBank accessions AJ276081 and JN687477) as outgroup. This indicated the presence of five AM fungal clades belonging to the families Claroideoglomeraceae, Diversisporaceae, Gigasporaceae, and Glomeraceae (Figure 4), the most frequent sequences corresponding to Glomeraceae. The subclusters contained close matches to taxa previously identified by Singh et al. [22] based on spore morphology of AM fungi in rhizosphere soils of T. grandis: TR1-16, TR1-43, TS4-4, AR5-7 and TS6-1 are close to Rhizophagus intraradices or R. irregularis, while TR1-27 is close to Redeckera fulvum. Clone sequences TS4-9 and TS4-32 are similar to Diversispora aurantia, while TR3-R10 is probably Gigaspora margarita. When sequence data are compared with individual TRFs (Table S3 and Figure 4), it is clear that individual TRFs cannot be used to identify sequence type, because many different species may generate a TRF of the same size. For example, the FAM fragment at 164b could equally well be from G. indicum, Re. fulvum or Claroideoglomus etunicatum.

Bottom Line: A total of 38 distinct terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) were found, 31 of which were shared between A. crassna and T. grandis.The Glomeraceae were found to be common in all study sites.Future inoculum production and utilization efforts can be directed toward the identified symbiotic associates of these valuable tree species to enhance reforestation efforts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

ABSTRACT
Aquilaria crassna Pierre ex Lec. and Tectona grandis Linn.f. are sources of resin-suffused agarwood and teak timber, respectively. This study investigated arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus community structure in roots and rhizosphere soils of A. crassna and T. grandis from plantations in Thailand to understand whether AM fungal communities present in roots and rhizosphere soils vary with host plant species and study sites. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism complemented with clone libraries revealed that AM fungal community composition in A. crassna and T. grandis were similar. A total of 38 distinct terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) were found, 31 of which were shared between A. crassna and T. grandis. AM fungal communities in T. grandis samples from different sites were similar, as were those in A. crassna. The estimated average minimum numbers of AM fungal taxa per sample in roots and soils of T. grandis were at least 1.89 vs. 2.55, respectively, and those of A. crassna were 2.85 vs. 2.33 respectively. The TRFs were attributed to Claroideoglomeraceae, Diversisporaceae, Gigasporaceae and Glomeraceae. The Glomeraceae were found to be common in all study sites. Specific AM taxa in roots and soils of T. grandis and A. crassna were not affected by host plant species and sample source (root vs. soil) but affected by collecting site. Future inoculum production and utilization efforts can be directed toward the identified symbiotic associates of these valuable tree species to enhance reforestation efforts.

Show MeSH