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Evolution in obesity and chronic disease prevention practice in California public health departments, 2010.

Schwarte L, Ngo S, Banthia R, Flores G, Prentice B, Boyle M, Samuels SE - Prev Chronic Dis (2014)

Bottom Line: The departmental response rate for the 2010 survey was 87% (53 of California's 61 LHDs).LHDs that received foundation funding or had a lead person or organizational unit coordinating or taking the lead on activities related to obesity and chronic disease prevention were more likely than other LHDs to engage in some activities related to obesity prevention.Findings provide a benchmark from which further changes in the activities and funding sources of LHD chronic disease prevention practice may be measured.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ad Lucem Consulting, 1339 Waller St, San Francisco, CA 94117. Telephone: 415-252-8646. E-mail: Liz@adlucemconsulting.com. At the time of the study, Ms Schwarte was affiliated with The Sarah Samuels Center for Public Health Research and Evaluation, Oakland, California.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Local health departments (LHDs) are dedicating resources and attention to preventing obesity and associated chronic diseases, thus expanding their work beyond traditional public health activities such as surveillance. This study investigated practices of local health departments in California to prevent obesity and chronic disease.

Methods: We conducted a web-based survey in 2010 with leaders in California's LHDs to obtain diverse perspectives on LHDs' practices to prevent obesity and chronic disease. The departmental response rate for the 2010 survey was 87% (53 of California's 61 LHDs).

Results: Although staff for preventing obesity and chronic disease decreased at 59% of LHDs and stayed the same at 26% of LHDs since 2006, LHDs still contributed the same (12%) or a higher (62%) level of effort in these areas. Factors contributing to internal changes to address obesity and chronic disease prevention included momentum in the field of obesity prevention, opportunities to learn from other health departments, participation in obesity and chronic disease prevention initiatives, and flexible funding streams for chronic disease prevention. LHDs that received foundation funding or had a lead person or organizational unit coordinating or taking the lead on activities related to obesity and chronic disease prevention were more likely than other LHDs to engage in some activities related to obesity prevention.

Conclusion: California LHDs are increasing the intensity and breadth of obesity and chronic disease prevention. Findings provide a benchmark from which further changes in the activities and funding sources of LHD chronic disease prevention practice may be measured.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Obesity and chronic disease prevention plans and policies in local public health departments, by study phase, California Public Health Departments Obesity and Chronic Disease Prevention Survey, 2007 and 2010.Plans and PoliciesNo. of DepartmentsPhase I, 2007 (N = 57)Phase II, 2010 (N = 53)Obesity and chronic disease prevention plan1722Workplace nutrition and/or physical activity policy2631Employee benefits3841
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Obesity and chronic disease prevention plans and policies in local public health departments, by study phase, California Public Health Departments Obesity and Chronic Disease Prevention Survey, 2007 and 2010.Plans and PoliciesNo. of DepartmentsPhase I, 2007 (N = 57)Phase II, 2010 (N = 53)Obesity and chronic disease prevention plan1722Workplace nutrition and/or physical activity policy2631Employee benefits3841

Mentions: Twenty-two LHDs in Phase II either had an organizational plan for preventing obesity and chronic disease or participated in a county-wide plan, compared with 17 departments in Phase I (Figure). Thirty-one LHDs had workplace nutrition policies, physical activity policies, or both for their own staff, an increase of 5 from Phase I. Forty-one LHDs also had employee benefit programs encouraging employees to engage in physical activity such as wellness programs, fitness club discounts, and walking clubs, 3 more than in Phase I.


Evolution in obesity and chronic disease prevention practice in California public health departments, 2010.

Schwarte L, Ngo S, Banthia R, Flores G, Prentice B, Boyle M, Samuels SE - Prev Chronic Dis (2014)

Obesity and chronic disease prevention plans and policies in local public health departments, by study phase, California Public Health Departments Obesity and Chronic Disease Prevention Survey, 2007 and 2010.Plans and PoliciesNo. of DepartmentsPhase I, 2007 (N = 57)Phase II, 2010 (N = 53)Obesity and chronic disease prevention plan1722Workplace nutrition and/or physical activity policy2631Employee benefits3841
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232341&req=5

Figure 1: Obesity and chronic disease prevention plans and policies in local public health departments, by study phase, California Public Health Departments Obesity and Chronic Disease Prevention Survey, 2007 and 2010.Plans and PoliciesNo. of DepartmentsPhase I, 2007 (N = 57)Phase II, 2010 (N = 53)Obesity and chronic disease prevention plan1722Workplace nutrition and/or physical activity policy2631Employee benefits3841
Mentions: Twenty-two LHDs in Phase II either had an organizational plan for preventing obesity and chronic disease or participated in a county-wide plan, compared with 17 departments in Phase I (Figure). Thirty-one LHDs had workplace nutrition policies, physical activity policies, or both for their own staff, an increase of 5 from Phase I. Forty-one LHDs also had employee benefit programs encouraging employees to engage in physical activity such as wellness programs, fitness club discounts, and walking clubs, 3 more than in Phase I.

Bottom Line: The departmental response rate for the 2010 survey was 87% (53 of California's 61 LHDs).LHDs that received foundation funding or had a lead person or organizational unit coordinating or taking the lead on activities related to obesity and chronic disease prevention were more likely than other LHDs to engage in some activities related to obesity prevention.Findings provide a benchmark from which further changes in the activities and funding sources of LHD chronic disease prevention practice may be measured.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ad Lucem Consulting, 1339 Waller St, San Francisco, CA 94117. Telephone: 415-252-8646. E-mail: Liz@adlucemconsulting.com. At the time of the study, Ms Schwarte was affiliated with The Sarah Samuels Center for Public Health Research and Evaluation, Oakland, California.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Local health departments (LHDs) are dedicating resources and attention to preventing obesity and associated chronic diseases, thus expanding their work beyond traditional public health activities such as surveillance. This study investigated practices of local health departments in California to prevent obesity and chronic disease.

Methods: We conducted a web-based survey in 2010 with leaders in California's LHDs to obtain diverse perspectives on LHDs' practices to prevent obesity and chronic disease. The departmental response rate for the 2010 survey was 87% (53 of California's 61 LHDs).

Results: Although staff for preventing obesity and chronic disease decreased at 59% of LHDs and stayed the same at 26% of LHDs since 2006, LHDs still contributed the same (12%) or a higher (62%) level of effort in these areas. Factors contributing to internal changes to address obesity and chronic disease prevention included momentum in the field of obesity prevention, opportunities to learn from other health departments, participation in obesity and chronic disease prevention initiatives, and flexible funding streams for chronic disease prevention. LHDs that received foundation funding or had a lead person or organizational unit coordinating or taking the lead on activities related to obesity and chronic disease prevention were more likely than other LHDs to engage in some activities related to obesity prevention.

Conclusion: California LHDs are increasing the intensity and breadth of obesity and chronic disease prevention. Findings provide a benchmark from which further changes in the activities and funding sources of LHD chronic disease prevention practice may be measured.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus