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The narrated, nonnarrated, and the disnarrated: conceptual tools for analyzing narratives in health services research.

Vindrola-Padros C, Johnson GA - Qual Health Res (2014)

Bottom Line: The narrated refers to the actors (characters) and events (scenes) individuals decided to include in the narration of their experiences, the nonnarrated are everything not included in narration, and the disnarrated are elements that are narrated in the story but did not actually take place.We use our reflection to illustrate how an integrative analysis of these different forms of narration can allow us to produce a holistic interpretation of people's experiences of illness.This approach is still in the early stages of development, but we hope this article can promote a debate in the field and lead to the refinement of an important tool for narrative analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University College London, London, United Kingdom c.vindrola@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Narrative scenes identified by the children and their parents.
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fig2-1049732314549019: Narrative scenes identified by the children and their parents.

Mentions: We also asked, “What was represented? This question prompted us to search for events that are self-contained, that is, events that in some way had a beginning and an end (similar to a scene). The scenes identified by children and parents are shown in Figure 2. In all cases, the parents’ stories began with the symptoms that led them to believe their child was not well. The stories then moved on to describe the processes of obtaining diagnosis. This was often not an easy process because it required parents to surpass obstacles produced by poorly trained personnel, unsuitable hospital policies, a lack of medical resources, and excessive bureaucracy.


The narrated, nonnarrated, and the disnarrated: conceptual tools for analyzing narratives in health services research.

Vindrola-Padros C, Johnson GA - Qual Health Res (2014)

Narrative scenes identified by the children and their parents.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232312&req=5

fig2-1049732314549019: Narrative scenes identified by the children and their parents.
Mentions: We also asked, “What was represented? This question prompted us to search for events that are self-contained, that is, events that in some way had a beginning and an end (similar to a scene). The scenes identified by children and parents are shown in Figure 2. In all cases, the parents’ stories began with the symptoms that led them to believe their child was not well. The stories then moved on to describe the processes of obtaining diagnosis. This was often not an easy process because it required parents to surpass obstacles produced by poorly trained personnel, unsuitable hospital policies, a lack of medical resources, and excessive bureaucracy.

Bottom Line: The narrated refers to the actors (characters) and events (scenes) individuals decided to include in the narration of their experiences, the nonnarrated are everything not included in narration, and the disnarrated are elements that are narrated in the story but did not actually take place.We use our reflection to illustrate how an integrative analysis of these different forms of narration can allow us to produce a holistic interpretation of people's experiences of illness.This approach is still in the early stages of development, but we hope this article can promote a debate in the field and lead to the refinement of an important tool for narrative analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University College London, London, United Kingdom c.vindrola@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus