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Nutritional programming of coenzyme Q: potential for prevention and intervention?

Tarry-Adkins JL, Fernandez-Twinn DS, Chen JH, Hargreaves IP, Martin-Gronert MS, McConnell JM, Ozanne SE - FASEB J. (2014)

Bottom Line: Postweaning dietary supplementation with CoQ prevented these detrimental programming effects.Recuperated WBCs also had reduced CoQ (74±5.8%; P<0.05).We conclude that early intervention with CoQ in at-risk individuals may be a cost-effective and safe way of reducing the global burden of CVDs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Metabolic Research Laboratories, Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; and janeadkins@googlemail.com.

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Effect of in utero protein restriction and accelerated postnatal growth on aortic and WBC CoQ9 levels in 22 d and 12 mo rats (A), correlation between aortic and WBC CoQ9 concentrations in 12 mo male rats (B), aortic linked complex II-III activity in 22 d and 12 mo male rats (C), and correlation between aortic CoQ9 levels and linked complex II-III activity in 12 mo male rats (D). Results are expressed as means ± sem. *P < 0.05; n = 6–8/group.
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Figure 2: Effect of in utero protein restriction and accelerated postnatal growth on aortic and WBC CoQ9 levels in 22 d and 12 mo rats (A), correlation between aortic and WBC CoQ9 concentrations in 12 mo male rats (B), aortic linked complex II-III activity in 22 d and 12 mo male rats (C), and correlation between aortic CoQ9 levels and linked complex II-III activity in 12 mo male rats (D). Results are expressed as means ± sem. *P < 0.05; n = 6–8/group.

Mentions: At 22 d of age, aortic CoQ9 concentration was significantly reduced (P<0.05) in the recuperated group compared with controls (Fig. 2A). There was also an effect of aging such that CoQ9 levels in 12 mo aortas were significantly (P<0.05) lower than those observed at 22 d of age. At 12 mo of age, both aortic and WBC levels of CoQ9 were significantly reduced (P<0.05) in the recuperated group compared with control animals (Fig. 2A). CoQ10 supplementation had no effect on aortic CoQ9 levels in control animals (203±39 vs. 196±35 pmol/mg protein) nor in recuperated animals (119±15 vs. 158±30 pmol/mg protein). Likewise, CoQ9 levels in WBCs were also unaffected by CoQ10 supplementation (control: 161±32; control CoQ: 140±17; recuperated: 111±4; recuperated CoQ: 108±12 pmol/mg protein). Interestingly however, a strong positive correlation (P<0.0001; r2=0.84) was observed between aortic and WBC CoQ9 concentrations at 12 mo of age in control and recuperated offspring (Fig. 2B).


Nutritional programming of coenzyme Q: potential for prevention and intervention?

Tarry-Adkins JL, Fernandez-Twinn DS, Chen JH, Hargreaves IP, Martin-Gronert MS, McConnell JM, Ozanne SE - FASEB J. (2014)

Effect of in utero protein restriction and accelerated postnatal growth on aortic and WBC CoQ9 levels in 22 d and 12 mo rats (A), correlation between aortic and WBC CoQ9 concentrations in 12 mo male rats (B), aortic linked complex II-III activity in 22 d and 12 mo male rats (C), and correlation between aortic CoQ9 levels and linked complex II-III activity in 12 mo male rats (D). Results are expressed as means ± sem. *P < 0.05; n = 6–8/group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232289&req=5

Figure 2: Effect of in utero protein restriction and accelerated postnatal growth on aortic and WBC CoQ9 levels in 22 d and 12 mo rats (A), correlation between aortic and WBC CoQ9 concentrations in 12 mo male rats (B), aortic linked complex II-III activity in 22 d and 12 mo male rats (C), and correlation between aortic CoQ9 levels and linked complex II-III activity in 12 mo male rats (D). Results are expressed as means ± sem. *P < 0.05; n = 6–8/group.
Mentions: At 22 d of age, aortic CoQ9 concentration was significantly reduced (P<0.05) in the recuperated group compared with controls (Fig. 2A). There was also an effect of aging such that CoQ9 levels in 12 mo aortas were significantly (P<0.05) lower than those observed at 22 d of age. At 12 mo of age, both aortic and WBC levels of CoQ9 were significantly reduced (P<0.05) in the recuperated group compared with control animals (Fig. 2A). CoQ10 supplementation had no effect on aortic CoQ9 levels in control animals (203±39 vs. 196±35 pmol/mg protein) nor in recuperated animals (119±15 vs. 158±30 pmol/mg protein). Likewise, CoQ9 levels in WBCs were also unaffected by CoQ10 supplementation (control: 161±32; control CoQ: 140±17; recuperated: 111±4; recuperated CoQ: 108±12 pmol/mg protein). Interestingly however, a strong positive correlation (P<0.0001; r2=0.84) was observed between aortic and WBC CoQ9 concentrations at 12 mo of age in control and recuperated offspring (Fig. 2B).

Bottom Line: Postweaning dietary supplementation with CoQ prevented these detrimental programming effects.Recuperated WBCs also had reduced CoQ (74±5.8%; P<0.05).We conclude that early intervention with CoQ in at-risk individuals may be a cost-effective and safe way of reducing the global burden of CVDs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Metabolic Research Laboratories, Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; and janeadkins@googlemail.com.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus