Limits...
Stem memory T cells (TSCM)-their role in cancer and HIV immunotherapies.

Flynn JK, Gorry PR - Clin Transl Immunology (2014)

Bottom Line: Stem memory T cells (TSCM) have been described in mice, non-human primates and in humans, constituting approximately 2-4% of the total CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell population in the periphery.TSCM represent the earliest and long-lasting developmental stage of memory T cells, displaying stem cell-like properties, and exhibiting a gene profile between naïve and central memory T cells.How and when the formation of TSCM occurs during the immune response to pathogens and the therapeutic potential of these cells are currently being investigated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Biomedical Research, Burnet Institute , Melbourne, Victoria, Australia ; Department of Infectious Diseases, Monash University , Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Stem memory T cells (TSCM) have been described in mice, non-human primates and in humans, constituting approximately 2-4% of the total CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell population in the periphery. TSCM represent the earliest and long-lasting developmental stage of memory T cells, displaying stem cell-like properties, and exhibiting a gene profile between naïve and central memory T cells. Their self-renewal capacity and long-term survival has sparked interest in the cancer and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) fields. How and when the formation of TSCM occurs during the immune response to pathogens and the therapeutic potential of these cells are currently being investigated. This review will explore the potential role of TSCM to be used as, or targeted by, immunotherapies and vaccines for treatment of cancer and HIV.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

T-cell subsets are commonly characterized by their phenotypic and functional profiles. Memory T-cell subsets in particular have often been described by their effector functions, where CM and EM cells can be distinguished by CM cells having a greater proliferative and IL-2-producing capacity whilst EM have an increased secretion of effector cytokines, including IFN-gamma and enhanced cytotoxicity.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232066&req=5

fig2: T-cell subsets are commonly characterized by their phenotypic and functional profiles. Memory T-cell subsets in particular have often been described by their effector functions, where CM and EM cells can be distinguished by CM cells having a greater proliferative and IL-2-producing capacity whilst EM have an increased secretion of effector cytokines, including IFN-gamma and enhanced cytotoxicity.

Mentions: Memory T cells have been characterized by their phenotypic and functional profiles into T-cell subsets, typically central memory (CM) and effector memory (EM) T cells (Table 1). Phenotypically, CM and EM cells are divided respectively by the presence or absence of lymph node homing receptors CD62L (L-selectin) and C–C chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) on their surface.8, 9 Naïve and CM T cells express CD62L and CCR7 for migration to secondary lymphoid organs, and in the absence of these molecules, EM and effector cells can accumulate in peripheral tissues. CM and EM can also be divided by the level and type of cytokine secretion, with CM cells having a greater proliferative and interleukin-2 (IL-2)-producing ability, whereas EM have increased secretion of effector cytokines including interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-48, 9 (Figure 2).


Stem memory T cells (TSCM)-their role in cancer and HIV immunotherapies.

Flynn JK, Gorry PR - Clin Transl Immunology (2014)

T-cell subsets are commonly characterized by their phenotypic and functional profiles. Memory T-cell subsets in particular have often been described by their effector functions, where CM and EM cells can be distinguished by CM cells having a greater proliferative and IL-2-producing capacity whilst EM have an increased secretion of effector cytokines, including IFN-gamma and enhanced cytotoxicity.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232066&req=5

fig2: T-cell subsets are commonly characterized by their phenotypic and functional profiles. Memory T-cell subsets in particular have often been described by their effector functions, where CM and EM cells can be distinguished by CM cells having a greater proliferative and IL-2-producing capacity whilst EM have an increased secretion of effector cytokines, including IFN-gamma and enhanced cytotoxicity.
Mentions: Memory T cells have been characterized by their phenotypic and functional profiles into T-cell subsets, typically central memory (CM) and effector memory (EM) T cells (Table 1). Phenotypically, CM and EM cells are divided respectively by the presence or absence of lymph node homing receptors CD62L (L-selectin) and C–C chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) on their surface.8, 9 Naïve and CM T cells express CD62L and CCR7 for migration to secondary lymphoid organs, and in the absence of these molecules, EM and effector cells can accumulate in peripheral tissues. CM and EM can also be divided by the level and type of cytokine secretion, with CM cells having a greater proliferative and interleukin-2 (IL-2)-producing ability, whereas EM have increased secretion of effector cytokines including interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-48, 9 (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Stem memory T cells (TSCM) have been described in mice, non-human primates and in humans, constituting approximately 2-4% of the total CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell population in the periphery.TSCM represent the earliest and long-lasting developmental stage of memory T cells, displaying stem cell-like properties, and exhibiting a gene profile between naïve and central memory T cells.How and when the formation of TSCM occurs during the immune response to pathogens and the therapeutic potential of these cells are currently being investigated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Biomedical Research, Burnet Institute , Melbourne, Victoria, Australia ; Department of Infectious Diseases, Monash University , Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Stem memory T cells (TSCM) have been described in mice, non-human primates and in humans, constituting approximately 2-4% of the total CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell population in the periphery. TSCM represent the earliest and long-lasting developmental stage of memory T cells, displaying stem cell-like properties, and exhibiting a gene profile between naïve and central memory T cells. Their self-renewal capacity and long-term survival has sparked interest in the cancer and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) fields. How and when the formation of TSCM occurs during the immune response to pathogens and the therapeutic potential of these cells are currently being investigated. This review will explore the potential role of TSCM to be used as, or targeted by, immunotherapies and vaccines for treatment of cancer and HIV.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus