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Tolerability of the capsaicin 8% patch following pretreatment with lidocaine or tramadol in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain: a multicentre, randomized, assessor-blinded study.

Jensen TS, Høye K, Fricová J, Vanelderen P, Ernault E, Siciliano T, Marques S - Eur J Pain (2014)

Bottom Line: Application of the capsaicin 8% patch is associated with treatment-related discomfort.Capsaicin 8% patch tolerability was similar in the two arms, with comparable results for most secondary endpoints.Tramadol given 30 min before patch application should be considered as an alternative pretreatment option in patients receiving capsaicin patch treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Danish Pain Research Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Proportion of patients with an increase in NPRS ‘Pain Now’ scores from baseline at any time up to the evening of the day of the treatment visit. Error bars indicate 95% confidence intervals. NPRS, Numerical Pain Rating Scale.
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fig04: Proportion of patients with an increase in NPRS ‘Pain Now’ scores from baseline at any time up to the evening of the day of the treatment visit. Error bars indicate 95% confidence intervals. NPRS, Numerical Pain Rating Scale.

Mentions: A similar proportion of patients receiving lidocaine reported an increase of ≥2 points from baseline in the NPRS ‘Pain Now’ score for at least one time point to the evening of the treatment visit compared with tramadol-treated patients (Fig. 4). The proportion of patients reporting an increase of >33% in NPRS ‘Pain Now’ score from baseline for at least one time point to the evening of the treatment visit was similar between treatment arms (Fig. 4). The proportion of patients reporting an increase of >33% in NPRS ‘Average Pain’ score from baseline to at least one subsequent time point up to day 3 was similar in the lidocaine and the tramadol arms (Fig. 5).


Tolerability of the capsaicin 8% patch following pretreatment with lidocaine or tramadol in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain: a multicentre, randomized, assessor-blinded study.

Jensen TS, Høye K, Fricová J, Vanelderen P, Ernault E, Siciliano T, Marques S - Eur J Pain (2014)

Proportion of patients with an increase in NPRS ‘Pain Now’ scores from baseline at any time up to the evening of the day of the treatment visit. Error bars indicate 95% confidence intervals. NPRS, Numerical Pain Rating Scale.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232045&req=5

fig04: Proportion of patients with an increase in NPRS ‘Pain Now’ scores from baseline at any time up to the evening of the day of the treatment visit. Error bars indicate 95% confidence intervals. NPRS, Numerical Pain Rating Scale.
Mentions: A similar proportion of patients receiving lidocaine reported an increase of ≥2 points from baseline in the NPRS ‘Pain Now’ score for at least one time point to the evening of the treatment visit compared with tramadol-treated patients (Fig. 4). The proportion of patients reporting an increase of >33% in NPRS ‘Pain Now’ score from baseline for at least one time point to the evening of the treatment visit was similar between treatment arms (Fig. 4). The proportion of patients reporting an increase of >33% in NPRS ‘Average Pain’ score from baseline to at least one subsequent time point up to day 3 was similar in the lidocaine and the tramadol arms (Fig. 5).

Bottom Line: Application of the capsaicin 8% patch is associated with treatment-related discomfort.Capsaicin 8% patch tolerability was similar in the two arms, with comparable results for most secondary endpoints.Tramadol given 30 min before patch application should be considered as an alternative pretreatment option in patients receiving capsaicin patch treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Danish Pain Research Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus