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The relationship between area poverty rate and site-specific cancer incidence in the United States.

Boscoe FP, Johnson CJ, Sherman RL, Stinchcomb DG, Lin G, Henry KA - Cancer (2014)

Bottom Line: Nineteen of these sites had monotonic increases or decreases in risk across all 4 poverty categories.The sites most strongly associated with higher poverty were Kaposi sarcoma, larynx, cervix, penis, and liver; those most strongly associated with lower poverty were melanoma, thyroid, other nonepithelial skin, and testis.Sites associated with higher poverty had lower incidence and higher mortality than those associated with lower poverty.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: New York State Cancer Registry, Albany, New York.

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Risk ratios of cancer incidence between highest and lowest poverty category, United States, 2005 through 2009. IBD indicates inflammatory bowel disease.
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fig01: Risk ratios of cancer incidence between highest and lowest poverty category, United States, 2005 through 2009. IBD indicates inflammatory bowel disease.

Mentions: Figure 1 presents the sex-specific risk ratios of the highest to lowest residential poverty category for each cancer site. A majority of cancer sites show a significant relationship with poverty rate. Twenty-four of the 31 sites for which there are data for both sexes have a 95% confidence interval that excludes unity, as do all 8 of the sex-specific sites. Fourteen of these 32 sites are associated with higher poverty and 18 are associated with lower poverty. HPV and tobacco-related cancers are also associated with higher poverty. The sites most strongly associated with higher poverty are Kaposi sarcoma, larynx, cervix, and penis; those most strongly associated with lower poverty are melanoma, thyroid, and other nonepithelial skin. Sites with monotonic increases or decreases across all 4 poverty categories are indicated with symbols. Thirteen of the 31 sites for which there are data for both sexes show monotonic increases or decreases, along with 6 of the sex-specific sites. Adjusting for age and race, cancer incidence differed significantly by poverty category for nearly all sex-site combinations; the only exceptions were bone and joint, eye and orbit among females, and nasal cavity among females. This analysis included instances where the relationship between poverty and incidence was not monotonic, and the interpretation of such patterns may be less clear.


The relationship between area poverty rate and site-specific cancer incidence in the United States.

Boscoe FP, Johnson CJ, Sherman RL, Stinchcomb DG, Lin G, Henry KA - Cancer (2014)

Risk ratios of cancer incidence between highest and lowest poverty category, United States, 2005 through 2009. IBD indicates inflammatory bowel disease.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232004&req=5

fig01: Risk ratios of cancer incidence between highest and lowest poverty category, United States, 2005 through 2009. IBD indicates inflammatory bowel disease.
Mentions: Figure 1 presents the sex-specific risk ratios of the highest to lowest residential poverty category for each cancer site. A majority of cancer sites show a significant relationship with poverty rate. Twenty-four of the 31 sites for which there are data for both sexes have a 95% confidence interval that excludes unity, as do all 8 of the sex-specific sites. Fourteen of these 32 sites are associated with higher poverty and 18 are associated with lower poverty. HPV and tobacco-related cancers are also associated with higher poverty. The sites most strongly associated with higher poverty are Kaposi sarcoma, larynx, cervix, and penis; those most strongly associated with lower poverty are melanoma, thyroid, and other nonepithelial skin. Sites with monotonic increases or decreases across all 4 poverty categories are indicated with symbols. Thirteen of the 31 sites for which there are data for both sexes show monotonic increases or decreases, along with 6 of the sex-specific sites. Adjusting for age and race, cancer incidence differed significantly by poverty category for nearly all sex-site combinations; the only exceptions were bone and joint, eye and orbit among females, and nasal cavity among females. This analysis included instances where the relationship between poverty and incidence was not monotonic, and the interpretation of such patterns may be less clear.

Bottom Line: Nineteen of these sites had monotonic increases or decreases in risk across all 4 poverty categories.The sites most strongly associated with higher poverty were Kaposi sarcoma, larynx, cervix, penis, and liver; those most strongly associated with lower poverty were melanoma, thyroid, other nonepithelial skin, and testis.Sites associated with higher poverty had lower incidence and higher mortality than those associated with lower poverty.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: New York State Cancer Registry, Albany, New York.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus