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Nationwide laboratory-based surveillance of invasive beta-haemolytic streptococci in Denmark from 2005 to 2011.

Lambertsen LM, Ingels H, Schønheyder HC, Hoffmann S, Danish Streptococcal Surveillance Collaboration Group 20 - Clin. Microbiol. Infect. (2013)

Bottom Line: Potential coverage for future vaccines against GAS and GBS disease was 76% compared with the 26-valent GAS vaccine and 89% based on GBS serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III and V.The number of reported cases of invasive BHS disease increased in Denmark from 2005 to 2011.Nationwide laboratory-based surveillance of BHS is required to monitor epidemiological changes, explore potential outbreaks and determine potential vaccine coverage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Neisseria and Streptococcus Reference (NSR), Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Annual incidences of invasive beta-haemolytic streptococci (BHS) and group A, B, C and G streptococci (GAS, GBS, GCS and GGS, respectively) in Denmark from 2005 to 2011.
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fig01: Annual incidences of invasive beta-haemolytic streptococci (BHS) and group A, B, C and G streptococci (GAS, GBS, GCS and GGS, respectively) in Denmark from 2005 to 2011.

Mentions: The annual incidence of BHS causing invasive disease in Denmark increased from 6.2 per 100 000 persons in 2005 to 8.9 in 2011, peaking at 9.2 per 100 000 in 2009. The increase was statistically significant (IRR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2–1.4, p <0.0001) and it was observed for all groups of BHS (GAS, IRR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1–1.5, p 0.0002; GBS, IRR 1.4, 95% CI 1.2–1.6, p 0.0002; GCS, IRR 2.0, 95% CI 1.5–2.8, p <0.0001; GGS, IRR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1–1.4, p 0.0015). During the most recent year, 2011, the annual incidences were 3.1 for GAS, 2.6 for GGS, 2.3 for GBS and 0.9 for GCS per 100 000 persons (Fig.1). Most isolates originated from blood and the proportion of isolates from CSF was highest for GBS and GAS (Table1).


Nationwide laboratory-based surveillance of invasive beta-haemolytic streptococci in Denmark from 2005 to 2011.

Lambertsen LM, Ingels H, Schønheyder HC, Hoffmann S, Danish Streptococcal Surveillance Collaboration Group 20 - Clin. Microbiol. Infect. (2013)

Annual incidences of invasive beta-haemolytic streptococci (BHS) and group A, B, C and G streptococci (GAS, GBS, GCS and GGS, respectively) in Denmark from 2005 to 2011.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4232002&req=5

fig01: Annual incidences of invasive beta-haemolytic streptococci (BHS) and group A, B, C and G streptococci (GAS, GBS, GCS and GGS, respectively) in Denmark from 2005 to 2011.
Mentions: The annual incidence of BHS causing invasive disease in Denmark increased from 6.2 per 100 000 persons in 2005 to 8.9 in 2011, peaking at 9.2 per 100 000 in 2009. The increase was statistically significant (IRR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2–1.4, p <0.0001) and it was observed for all groups of BHS (GAS, IRR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1–1.5, p 0.0002; GBS, IRR 1.4, 95% CI 1.2–1.6, p 0.0002; GCS, IRR 2.0, 95% CI 1.5–2.8, p <0.0001; GGS, IRR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1–1.4, p 0.0015). During the most recent year, 2011, the annual incidences were 3.1 for GAS, 2.6 for GGS, 2.3 for GBS and 0.9 for GCS per 100 000 persons (Fig.1). Most isolates originated from blood and the proportion of isolates from CSF was highest for GBS and GAS (Table1).

Bottom Line: Potential coverage for future vaccines against GAS and GBS disease was 76% compared with the 26-valent GAS vaccine and 89% based on GBS serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III and V.The number of reported cases of invasive BHS disease increased in Denmark from 2005 to 2011.Nationwide laboratory-based surveillance of BHS is required to monitor epidemiological changes, explore potential outbreaks and determine potential vaccine coverage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Neisseria and Streptococcus Reference (NSR), Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus