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“ Living Well with Diabetes ” : Evaluation of a Pilot Program to Promote Diabetes Prevention and Self-Management in a Medically Underserved Community

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A substantial disparity exists in the prevalence and effective self-management of diabetes among African Americans in the United States. Community-level programs have the potential to affect self-efficacy and may be helpful in overcoming common barriers to self-management. The Neighborhood Health Talker Program used community members trained as cultural health brokers to engage their communities in conversations about “living diabetes well.” Program evaluators used mixed methods to analyze post-conversation surveys and Health Talker field notes. These indicated an increase in diabetes-related knowledge and increased confidence among conversation participants. Conversations included discussion of barriers and facilitators to lifestyle changes and effective self-management that are frequently overlooked in a clinical setting.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Diabetes knowledge and confidence (1 or 2 on a 5-point scale) by personal experience with diabetes (n = 195).
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Figure 2: Diabetes knowledge and confidence (1 or 2 on a 5-point scale) by personal experience with diabetes (n = 195).

Mentions: Responses to these questions varied by subgroup. For example, when compared to respondents who reported no personal experience with diabetes (themselves or family) (n = 51), a greater proportion of those with personal experience (n = 144) answered “yes” (1 or 2 on a 5-point scale) to a question asking whether they felt more confident that they will be able to better self-manage their diabetes or help someone they love to better self-manage their diabetes (P = NS). This subgroup also more frequently reported that they wanted to share what they learned about “living diabetes well” with others (P = 0.044) (Figure 2). Differences between the responses of males and females were neither substantial nor significant. Differences by age were also not substantial, with the exception of a tendency for older respondents (≥ 60 years of age) to be more likely to indicate their desire to share what they learned with others (79% answered “yes” [1 or 2] among those ≥ 60 years of age compared to 53–64% in other age-groups).


“ Living Well with Diabetes ” : Evaluation of a Pilot Program to Promote Diabetes Prevention and Self-Management in a Medically Underserved Community
Diabetes knowledge and confidence (1 or 2 on a 5-point scale) by personal experience with diabetes (n = 195).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231932&req=5

Figure 2: Diabetes knowledge and confidence (1 or 2 on a 5-point scale) by personal experience with diabetes (n = 195).
Mentions: Responses to these questions varied by subgroup. For example, when compared to respondents who reported no personal experience with diabetes (themselves or family) (n = 51), a greater proportion of those with personal experience (n = 144) answered “yes” (1 or 2 on a 5-point scale) to a question asking whether they felt more confident that they will be able to better self-manage their diabetes or help someone they love to better self-manage their diabetes (P = NS). This subgroup also more frequently reported that they wanted to share what they learned about “living diabetes well” with others (P = 0.044) (Figure 2). Differences between the responses of males and females were neither substantial nor significant. Differences by age were also not substantial, with the exception of a tendency for older respondents (≥ 60 years of age) to be more likely to indicate their desire to share what they learned with others (79% answered “yes” [1 or 2] among those ≥ 60 years of age compared to 53–64% in other age-groups).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A substantial disparity exists in the prevalence and effective self-management of diabetes among African Americans in the United States. Community-level programs have the potential to affect self-efficacy and may be helpful in overcoming common barriers to self-management. The Neighborhood Health Talker Program used community members trained as cultural health brokers to engage their communities in conversations about “living diabetes well.” Program evaluators used mixed methods to analyze post-conversation surveys and Health Talker field notes. These indicated an increase in diabetes-related knowledge and increased confidence among conversation participants. Conversations included discussion of barriers and facilitators to lifestyle changes and effective self-management that are frequently overlooked in a clinical setting.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus