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Prevention and control of schistosomiasis: a current perspective.

Inobaya MT, Olveda RM, Chau TN, Olveda DU, Ross AG - Res Rep Trop Med (2014)

Bottom Line: The cornerstone of control to date has been mass drug administration with 40 mg/kg of praziquantel but there are problems with this approach.Human and bovine vaccines are in various stages of development.Integrated control, targeting the life cycle, is the only approach that will lead to sustainability and future elimination.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health, Research Institute for Tropical Medicine, Muntinlupa City, Philippines.

ABSTRACT
Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease that ranks second only to malaria in terms of human suffering in the tropics and subtropics. Five species are known to infect man and there are currently over 240 million people infected worldwide. The cornerstone of control to date has been mass drug administration with 40 mg/kg of praziquantel but there are problems with this approach. Human and bovine vaccines are in various stages of development. Integrated control, targeting the life cycle, is the only approach that will lead to sustainability and future elimination.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Worldwide geographical distribution of schistosomiasis in 2010.Note: Copyright © 2013 World Health Organization. Reproduced, with the permission of the publisher, from Schistosomiasis Progress Report (2001–2011) and Strategic Plan (2012–2020), Geneva, World Health Organization, 2013. Available from: http://www.who.int/schistosomiasis/resources/en/. Accessed December 9, 2013.1
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Figure 1: Worldwide geographical distribution of schistosomiasis in 2010.Note: Copyright © 2013 World Health Organization. Reproduced, with the permission of the publisher, from Schistosomiasis Progress Report (2001–2011) and Strategic Plan (2012–2020), Geneva, World Health Organization, 2013. Available from: http://www.who.int/schistosomiasis/resources/en/. Accessed December 9, 2013.1

Mentions: Schistosomiasis is caused by infectious trematode worms of the genus Schistosoma. There are five schistosome species known to infect humans: S. haematobium (identified in 1852), S. japonicum (1904), S. mansoni (1907), S. intercalatum (1934), and S. mekongi (1978).1 In 2011, an estimated 243 million people in 78 countries were living in areas of high risk for the disease.2 The African region is the most affected, with 42 countries endemic for the infection, followed by the Eastern Mediterranean region with 16 countries affected. Schistosomiasis was also endemic in 10 countries in the region of the Americas, six in the Western Pacific regions, and three in the Southeast Asian region and in Turkey, the only country affected in the European region (Figure 1).1


Prevention and control of schistosomiasis: a current perspective.

Inobaya MT, Olveda RM, Chau TN, Olveda DU, Ross AG - Res Rep Trop Med (2014)

Worldwide geographical distribution of schistosomiasis in 2010.Note: Copyright © 2013 World Health Organization. Reproduced, with the permission of the publisher, from Schistosomiasis Progress Report (2001–2011) and Strategic Plan (2012–2020), Geneva, World Health Organization, 2013. Available from: http://www.who.int/schistosomiasis/resources/en/. Accessed December 9, 2013.1
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231879&req=5

Figure 1: Worldwide geographical distribution of schistosomiasis in 2010.Note: Copyright © 2013 World Health Organization. Reproduced, with the permission of the publisher, from Schistosomiasis Progress Report (2001–2011) and Strategic Plan (2012–2020), Geneva, World Health Organization, 2013. Available from: http://www.who.int/schistosomiasis/resources/en/. Accessed December 9, 2013.1
Mentions: Schistosomiasis is caused by infectious trematode worms of the genus Schistosoma. There are five schistosome species known to infect humans: S. haematobium (identified in 1852), S. japonicum (1904), S. mansoni (1907), S. intercalatum (1934), and S. mekongi (1978).1 In 2011, an estimated 243 million people in 78 countries were living in areas of high risk for the disease.2 The African region is the most affected, with 42 countries endemic for the infection, followed by the Eastern Mediterranean region with 16 countries affected. Schistosomiasis was also endemic in 10 countries in the region of the Americas, six in the Western Pacific regions, and three in the Southeast Asian region and in Turkey, the only country affected in the European region (Figure 1).1

Bottom Line: The cornerstone of control to date has been mass drug administration with 40 mg/kg of praziquantel but there are problems with this approach.Human and bovine vaccines are in various stages of development.Integrated control, targeting the life cycle, is the only approach that will lead to sustainability and future elimination.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health, Research Institute for Tropical Medicine, Muntinlupa City, Philippines.

ABSTRACT
Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease that ranks second only to malaria in terms of human suffering in the tropics and subtropics. Five species are known to infect man and there are currently over 240 million people infected worldwide. The cornerstone of control to date has been mass drug administration with 40 mg/kg of praziquantel but there are problems with this approach. Human and bovine vaccines are in various stages of development. Integrated control, targeting the life cycle, is the only approach that will lead to sustainability and future elimination.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus