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Culturally-Tailored Education Programs to Address Health Literacy Deficits and Pervasive Health Disparities among Hispanics in Rural Shelbyville, Kentucky.

Ramos IN, Ramos KS, Boerner A, He Q, Tavera-Garcia MA - J Community Med Health Educ (2013)

Bottom Line: The program identified specific pathways to address health literacy deficits and disparities identified through a community-wide health assessment completed in 2010.Health education programs that embrace perceptions of the community of their own health, and that integrate knowledge into culturally-sensitive education, significantly improved health knowledge among Hispanic residents in rural Kentucky.Such gains may translate into sustainable improvements in health literacy and help reduce health disparities.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Information Sciences, University of Louisville, USA ; Center for Environmental Genomics and Integrative Biology, University of Louisville, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This investigation was conducted to evaluate the impact of culturally-tailored education on health knowledge among Hispanic residents of rural, Shelbyville, KY.

Design: The program identified specific pathways to address health literacy deficits and disparities identified through a community-wide health assessment completed in 2010.

Results: A total of 43 Hispanic males who shared deficiencies in community-wide health infrastructure were enrolled in the program. The curriculum included an introductory session followed by five, subject-specific, sessions offered on a weekly basis from February to April 2011. Pre/post-test assessments showed marked improvement in knowledge base for all participants after each session, most notably related to cardiovascular disease, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The group reconvened in January 2012 for follow-up instruction on cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as global assessment of knowledge retention over a nine-month period. Comparisons of pre/post testing in cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as global health-related knowledge showed significant gains for all parameters.

Conclusions: Health education programs that embrace perceptions of the community of their own health, and that integrate knowledge into culturally-sensitive education, significantly improved health knowledge among Hispanic residents in rural Kentucky. Such gains may translate into sustainable improvements in health literacy and help reduce health disparities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Short-Term Knowledge Gains in Diabetes by Individual Hispanic Participants Following Educational Intervention.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 3: Short-Term Knowledge Gains in Diabetes by Individual Hispanic Participants Following Educational Intervention.

Mentions: Participation during the phase I was consistently high for all modules and ranged from 18 to 26 participants. Each subject was assigned a unique identifier that was carried throughout the duration of the program for tracking of participation and performance. Unique identifiers were used to depict all graphical representations of the data in order to facilitate comparisons across individual modules and phases of the program. A measure of the pre-existing knowledge base and post-intervention performance for individual participants attending the cardiovascular module is presented in Figure 2. The data showed that participants had a modest knowledge base in this topical area, with only 4/26 participants missing all questions versus 16/26 participants scoring 40% or greater in the pretest. The greatest gap in knowledge prior to intervention was related to hidden sources of cholesterol in the diet and signs and symptoms of heart disease or stroke. Post-testing results showed remarkable improvements in overall knowledge among participants with 20/38 participants scoring 80% or better. The most significant knowledge gains were realized in the areas of cholesterol synthesis and storage in the human body, and high cholesterol as a known risk factor of heart attacks and stroke. The second module focused on generalized principles of nutrition. This module was attended by 25 participants with a pre-intervention knowledge base ranging from 17 to 50% (Figure 3). Participants were generally knowledgeable about the concept of nutrients, but unfamiliar with concepts of nutrition requirements, calorie counting, nutritional pyramid and body mass index. The overall knowledge base on this topic was weak with 9/25 participants scoring 17% and 20/25 scoring below 50%. As in the first module, post-testing performance showed remarkable short-term knowledge gains, with 20/25 participants scoring greater than 80% and 12/25 scoring 100%. Figure 4 shows the pre/post-testing performance of 26 participants attending the module on diabetes. Pre-intervention performance of participants ranged from 20 to 60%, with most participants scoring in the 20-40% range. Post testing showed marked improvements with 24/26 scoring 80% or better. The fourth module focused on metabolic syndrome, a topic which proved to be one of the most challenging because of significant deficits in pre-intervention knowledge base, with 4/18 participants missing all questions during pre-testing and 9/18 scoring at 20% (Figure 5). Significant knowledge gains were realized upon completion of the module with 16/18 participants scoring greater than 80% in the post-test. The last module focused on education on sexually transmitted diseases (Figure 6). While pre-testing performance was generally deficient with 17/22 participants scoring at or below 30%, it was interesting to find that all participants were familiar with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but overwhelmingly unfamiliar with general modes of HIV transmission, needle sharing, heterosexual transmission and incidence of HIV among Hispanics. Significant improvements in knowledge base were measured during post-testing with 20/22 participants scoring at or greater than 80%.


Culturally-Tailored Education Programs to Address Health Literacy Deficits and Pervasive Health Disparities among Hispanics in Rural Shelbyville, Kentucky.

Ramos IN, Ramos KS, Boerner A, He Q, Tavera-Garcia MA - J Community Med Health Educ (2013)

Short-Term Knowledge Gains in Diabetes by Individual Hispanic Participants Following Educational Intervention.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231820&req=5

Figure 3: Short-Term Knowledge Gains in Diabetes by Individual Hispanic Participants Following Educational Intervention.
Mentions: Participation during the phase I was consistently high for all modules and ranged from 18 to 26 participants. Each subject was assigned a unique identifier that was carried throughout the duration of the program for tracking of participation and performance. Unique identifiers were used to depict all graphical representations of the data in order to facilitate comparisons across individual modules and phases of the program. A measure of the pre-existing knowledge base and post-intervention performance for individual participants attending the cardiovascular module is presented in Figure 2. The data showed that participants had a modest knowledge base in this topical area, with only 4/26 participants missing all questions versus 16/26 participants scoring 40% or greater in the pretest. The greatest gap in knowledge prior to intervention was related to hidden sources of cholesterol in the diet and signs and symptoms of heart disease or stroke. Post-testing results showed remarkable improvements in overall knowledge among participants with 20/38 participants scoring 80% or better. The most significant knowledge gains were realized in the areas of cholesterol synthesis and storage in the human body, and high cholesterol as a known risk factor of heart attacks and stroke. The second module focused on generalized principles of nutrition. This module was attended by 25 participants with a pre-intervention knowledge base ranging from 17 to 50% (Figure 3). Participants were generally knowledgeable about the concept of nutrients, but unfamiliar with concepts of nutrition requirements, calorie counting, nutritional pyramid and body mass index. The overall knowledge base on this topic was weak with 9/25 participants scoring 17% and 20/25 scoring below 50%. As in the first module, post-testing performance showed remarkable short-term knowledge gains, with 20/25 participants scoring greater than 80% and 12/25 scoring 100%. Figure 4 shows the pre/post-testing performance of 26 participants attending the module on diabetes. Pre-intervention performance of participants ranged from 20 to 60%, with most participants scoring in the 20-40% range. Post testing showed marked improvements with 24/26 scoring 80% or better. The fourth module focused on metabolic syndrome, a topic which proved to be one of the most challenging because of significant deficits in pre-intervention knowledge base, with 4/18 participants missing all questions during pre-testing and 9/18 scoring at 20% (Figure 5). Significant knowledge gains were realized upon completion of the module with 16/18 participants scoring greater than 80% in the post-test. The last module focused on education on sexually transmitted diseases (Figure 6). While pre-testing performance was generally deficient with 17/22 participants scoring at or below 30%, it was interesting to find that all participants were familiar with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but overwhelmingly unfamiliar with general modes of HIV transmission, needle sharing, heterosexual transmission and incidence of HIV among Hispanics. Significant improvements in knowledge base were measured during post-testing with 20/22 participants scoring at or greater than 80%.

Bottom Line: The program identified specific pathways to address health literacy deficits and disparities identified through a community-wide health assessment completed in 2010.Health education programs that embrace perceptions of the community of their own health, and that integrate knowledge into culturally-sensitive education, significantly improved health knowledge among Hispanic residents in rural Kentucky.Such gains may translate into sustainable improvements in health literacy and help reduce health disparities.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Information Sciences, University of Louisville, USA ; Center for Environmental Genomics and Integrative Biology, University of Louisville, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This investigation was conducted to evaluate the impact of culturally-tailored education on health knowledge among Hispanic residents of rural, Shelbyville, KY.

Design: The program identified specific pathways to address health literacy deficits and disparities identified through a community-wide health assessment completed in 2010.

Results: A total of 43 Hispanic males who shared deficiencies in community-wide health infrastructure were enrolled in the program. The curriculum included an introductory session followed by five, subject-specific, sessions offered on a weekly basis from February to April 2011. Pre/post-test assessments showed marked improvement in knowledge base for all participants after each session, most notably related to cardiovascular disease, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The group reconvened in January 2012 for follow-up instruction on cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as global assessment of knowledge retention over a nine-month period. Comparisons of pre/post testing in cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as global health-related knowledge showed significant gains for all parameters.

Conclusions: Health education programs that embrace perceptions of the community of their own health, and that integrate knowledge into culturally-sensitive education, significantly improved health knowledge among Hispanic residents in rural Kentucky. Such gains may translate into sustainable improvements in health literacy and help reduce health disparities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus