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Comparative RNA-Seq based dissection of the regulatory networks and environmental stimuli underlying Vibrio parahaemolyticus gene expression during infection.

Livny J, Zhou X, Mandlik A, Hubbard T, Davis BM, Waldor MK - Nucleic Acids Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading worldwide cause of seafood-associated gastroenteritis, yet little is known regarding its intraintestinal gene expression or physiology.Our analyses also suggest that V. parahaemolyticus has access to glucose or other preferred carbon sources in vivo, but that iron is inconsistently available.The V. parahaemolyticus transcriptional response to in vivo growth is far more widespread than and largely distinct from that of V. cholerae, likely due to the distinct ways in which these diarrheal pathogens interact with and modulate the environment in the small intestine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA, USA Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and HHMI, 181 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA, USA livny@broadinstitute.org.

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Scatter plots of log2 FPKMO values per ORF in biological replicates. ORFs with no reads were assigned a value of 0.5 fragments. Genes of T3SS1 are depicted in red, and genes of T3SS2 are depicted in blue.
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Figure 3: Scatter plots of log2 FPKMO values per ORF in biological replicates. ORFs with no reads were assigned a value of 0.5 fragments. Genes of T3SS1 are depicted in red, and genes of T3SS2 are depicted in blue.

Mentions: Results from animal models typically are less consistent than those from broth cultures, and, as expected, there was more variability in V. parahaemolyticus gene expression profiles among CF samples than among independent LB cultures (Figure 3 and Supplementary Figure S2). In agreement with their essential role in colonization, a vast majority of T3SS2 genes were induced in all three rabbits. In contrast, genes of T3SS1 were significantly induced in only two samples (CF1 and CF2), and the correlation (R2) between CF3 and the other samples for T3SS1 was only ∼0.5, whereas it was 0.97 for CF1 and CF2 (Figure 3). This finding supports our previous report that T3SS1 is dispensable for pathogenesis (2), since infection occurred despite low expression of T3SS1, and suggests that activation of T3SS1 activity may be a response to (as yet undefined) host/microbiome factor(s) that are not invariably present. We also observed significant variability in induction of several other gene clusters, including those encoding iron transport systems and nitrate/nitrite reductases (Supplementary Figure S4), further suggesting that the metabolic environment encountered by V. parahaemolyticus during infection is not consistent even among genetically identical animals grown under controlled laboratory conditions.


Comparative RNA-Seq based dissection of the regulatory networks and environmental stimuli underlying Vibrio parahaemolyticus gene expression during infection.

Livny J, Zhou X, Mandlik A, Hubbard T, Davis BM, Waldor MK - Nucleic Acids Res. (2014)

Scatter plots of log2 FPKMO values per ORF in biological replicates. ORFs with no reads were assigned a value of 0.5 fragments. Genes of T3SS1 are depicted in red, and genes of T3SS2 are depicted in blue.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231756&req=5

Figure 3: Scatter plots of log2 FPKMO values per ORF in biological replicates. ORFs with no reads were assigned a value of 0.5 fragments. Genes of T3SS1 are depicted in red, and genes of T3SS2 are depicted in blue.
Mentions: Results from animal models typically are less consistent than those from broth cultures, and, as expected, there was more variability in V. parahaemolyticus gene expression profiles among CF samples than among independent LB cultures (Figure 3 and Supplementary Figure S2). In agreement with their essential role in colonization, a vast majority of T3SS2 genes were induced in all three rabbits. In contrast, genes of T3SS1 were significantly induced in only two samples (CF1 and CF2), and the correlation (R2) between CF3 and the other samples for T3SS1 was only ∼0.5, whereas it was 0.97 for CF1 and CF2 (Figure 3). This finding supports our previous report that T3SS1 is dispensable for pathogenesis (2), since infection occurred despite low expression of T3SS1, and suggests that activation of T3SS1 activity may be a response to (as yet undefined) host/microbiome factor(s) that are not invariably present. We also observed significant variability in induction of several other gene clusters, including those encoding iron transport systems and nitrate/nitrite reductases (Supplementary Figure S4), further suggesting that the metabolic environment encountered by V. parahaemolyticus during infection is not consistent even among genetically identical animals grown under controlled laboratory conditions.

Bottom Line: Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading worldwide cause of seafood-associated gastroenteritis, yet little is known regarding its intraintestinal gene expression or physiology.Our analyses also suggest that V. parahaemolyticus has access to glucose or other preferred carbon sources in vivo, but that iron is inconsistently available.The V. parahaemolyticus transcriptional response to in vivo growth is far more widespread than and largely distinct from that of V. cholerae, likely due to the distinct ways in which these diarrheal pathogens interact with and modulate the environment in the small intestine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA, USA Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and HHMI, 181 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA, USA livny@broadinstitute.org.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus