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Circular labor migration and HIV in India: exploring heterogeneity in bridge populations connecting areas of high and low HIV infection prevalence.

Rai T, Lambert HS, Borquez AB, Saggurti N, Mahapatra B, Ward H - J. Infect. Dis. (2014)

Bottom Line: We estimated the size of various subgroups defined by specific sexual behaviors across different locations and over time.However, we found evidence of sexual contacts at origin that could potentially sustain an epidemic once HIV is introduced.Self-perception of heightened risk could be exploited in designing prevention programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Imperial College London.

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Distribution of migrant men in the sample according to their sexual behavior at origin and destination.
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JIU432F1: Distribution of migrant men in the sample according to their sexual behavior at origin and destination.

Mentions: This distribution of migrants according to sexual behavior is shown in Figure 1. Overall, 174 (27%) formed a traditional bridge population, of which 127 (20%) formed the sustaining bridge population. Most of the others (295; 46% of the total sample) reported no casual sex at origin or destination, while the remaining groups reported casual sex but did not appear to constitute any kind of bridge population (Figure 1).Figure 1.


Circular labor migration and HIV in India: exploring heterogeneity in bridge populations connecting areas of high and low HIV infection prevalence.

Rai T, Lambert HS, Borquez AB, Saggurti N, Mahapatra B, Ward H - J. Infect. Dis. (2014)

Distribution of migrant men in the sample according to their sexual behavior at origin and destination.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231641&req=5

JIU432F1: Distribution of migrant men in the sample according to their sexual behavior at origin and destination.
Mentions: This distribution of migrants according to sexual behavior is shown in Figure 1. Overall, 174 (27%) formed a traditional bridge population, of which 127 (20%) formed the sustaining bridge population. Most of the others (295; 46% of the total sample) reported no casual sex at origin or destination, while the remaining groups reported casual sex but did not appear to constitute any kind of bridge population (Figure 1).Figure 1.

Bottom Line: We estimated the size of various subgroups defined by specific sexual behaviors across different locations and over time.However, we found evidence of sexual contacts at origin that could potentially sustain an epidemic once HIV is introduced.Self-perception of heightened risk could be exploited in designing prevention programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Imperial College London.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus