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The clinico-oncologic outcomes of elderly patients with glioblastoma after surgical resection followed by concomitant chemo-radiotherapy.

Park HK, Koh YC, Song SW - Brain Tumor Res Treat (2014)

Bottom Line: In multivariable analysis, extent of resection (p=0.034) and completion of CCRT (p=0.023) were statistically significant, independent prognostic factors only for PFS in all patients by Cox proportional hazards model.As for OS, there was no significant factor.Surgical resection and CCRT were well tolerated in elderly patients with glioblastoma, and maximal safe resection followed by timely CCRT could improve clinic-oncologic outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: There have been controversies in the treatment of elderly patients with glioblastoma. We introduce the outcome of the treatment of elderly patients with glioblastoma comparing with younger patients.

Methods: The author's hospital database was used to identify patients with histologically confirmed glioblastoma after surgery between January 2006 and December 2013. Forty-eight patients (control group) were under age 65 and 16 patients (elderly group) were aged 65 years or over at the time of surgery.

Results: The median age of the elderly group was 71 years and control group was 50 years. Mean number of medical comorbidities was 1.8 in the elderly group vs. 0.5 in the control group. The median progression free survival (PFS) was 5.6 months and the median overall survival (OS) was 19.9 months in all patients. The elderly group had a median PFS of 4.2 months vs. 8 months for the control group (log-rank test, p=0.762). Median OS was 8.2 months in the elderly group vs. 20.9 months in the control group (log-rank test, p=0.457). Major complications occurred in 5 cases (7.8%) for all patients. The ratio of completion of concomitant chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) was 81.3% and was the same between the two groups. In multivariable analysis, extent of resection (p=0.034) and completion of CCRT (p=0.023) were statistically significant, independent prognostic factors only for PFS in all patients by Cox proportional hazards model. Age was not an independent prognostic factor. As for OS, there was no significant factor.

Conclusion: Surgical resection and CCRT were well tolerated in elderly patients with glioblastoma, and maximal safe resection followed by timely CCRT could improve clinic-oncologic outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of progression free survival.
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Figure 1: Comparison of progression free survival.

Mentions: At the time of this study, 37 of 64 patients had expired. The median PFS was 5.6 months and the median OS was 19.9 months in all patients. The median PFS was 8 months in the control group vs. 4.2 months in the elderly group (Fig. 1), but there was no statistical significance (p=0.762). The median OS was 20.9 months in the control group vs. 8.2 months in the elderly group (Fig. 2), but there was also no statistical significance (p=0.457).


The clinico-oncologic outcomes of elderly patients with glioblastoma after surgical resection followed by concomitant chemo-radiotherapy.

Park HK, Koh YC, Song SW - Brain Tumor Res Treat (2014)

Comparison of progression free survival.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231626&req=5

Figure 1: Comparison of progression free survival.
Mentions: At the time of this study, 37 of 64 patients had expired. The median PFS was 5.6 months and the median OS was 19.9 months in all patients. The median PFS was 8 months in the control group vs. 4.2 months in the elderly group (Fig. 1), but there was no statistical significance (p=0.762). The median OS was 20.9 months in the control group vs. 8.2 months in the elderly group (Fig. 2), but there was also no statistical significance (p=0.457).

Bottom Line: In multivariable analysis, extent of resection (p=0.034) and completion of CCRT (p=0.023) were statistically significant, independent prognostic factors only for PFS in all patients by Cox proportional hazards model.As for OS, there was no significant factor.Surgical resection and CCRT were well tolerated in elderly patients with glioblastoma, and maximal safe resection followed by timely CCRT could improve clinic-oncologic outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: There have been controversies in the treatment of elderly patients with glioblastoma. We introduce the outcome of the treatment of elderly patients with glioblastoma comparing with younger patients.

Methods: The author's hospital database was used to identify patients with histologically confirmed glioblastoma after surgery between January 2006 and December 2013. Forty-eight patients (control group) were under age 65 and 16 patients (elderly group) were aged 65 years or over at the time of surgery.

Results: The median age of the elderly group was 71 years and control group was 50 years. Mean number of medical comorbidities was 1.8 in the elderly group vs. 0.5 in the control group. The median progression free survival (PFS) was 5.6 months and the median overall survival (OS) was 19.9 months in all patients. The elderly group had a median PFS of 4.2 months vs. 8 months for the control group (log-rank test, p=0.762). Median OS was 8.2 months in the elderly group vs. 20.9 months in the control group (log-rank test, p=0.457). Major complications occurred in 5 cases (7.8%) for all patients. The ratio of completion of concomitant chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) was 81.3% and was the same between the two groups. In multivariable analysis, extent of resection (p=0.034) and completion of CCRT (p=0.023) were statistically significant, independent prognostic factors only for PFS in all patients by Cox proportional hazards model. Age was not an independent prognostic factor. As for OS, there was no significant factor.

Conclusion: Surgical resection and CCRT were well tolerated in elderly patients with glioblastoma, and maximal safe resection followed by timely CCRT could improve clinic-oncologic outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus