Limits...
Can sexual selection theory inform genetic management of captive populations? A review.

Chargé R, Teplitsky C, Sorci G, Low M - Evol Appl (2014)

Bottom Line: Because current genetic management is often only partly successful in achieving these goals, it has been suggested that management insights may be found in sexual selection theory (in particular, female mate choice).We review the theoretical and empirical literature and consider how female mate choice might influence captive breeding in the context of current genetic guidelines for different sexual selection theories (i.e., direct benefits, good genes, compatible genes, sexy sons).The application of female mate choice to captive breeding is in its infancy and requires a goal-oriented framework based on the needs of captive species management, so researchers can make honest assessments of the costs and benefits of such an approach, using simulations, model species and captive animal data.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological and Environmental Science, Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions, University of Jyväskylä Jyväskylä, Finland.

ABSTRACT
Captive breeding for conservation purposes presents a serious practical challenge because several conflicting genetic processes (i.e., inbreeding depression, random genetic drift and genetic adaptation to captivity) need to be managed in concert to maximize captive population persistence and reintroduction success probability. Because current genetic management is often only partly successful in achieving these goals, it has been suggested that management insights may be found in sexual selection theory (in particular, female mate choice). We review the theoretical and empirical literature and consider how female mate choice might influence captive breeding in the context of current genetic guidelines for different sexual selection theories (i.e., direct benefits, good genes, compatible genes, sexy sons). We show that while mate choice shows promise as a tool in captive breeding under certain conditions, for most species, there is currently too little theoretical and empirical evidence to provide any clear guidelines that would guarantee positive fitness outcomes and avoid conflicts with other genetic goals. The application of female mate choice to captive breeding is in its infancy and requires a goal-oriented framework based on the needs of captive species management, so researchers can make honest assessments of the costs and benefits of such an approach, using simulations, model species and captive animal data.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Interactions between management actions, goals, and outcome for the viability of captive and reinforced populations (A) and potential additional effects of sexual selection theories if female mate choice would be integrated to captive breeding programs (B). The direction of the linkages is from left to right unless otherwise specified by an arrowhead. Positive effects are indicated by a black line, negative effects by a red dashed line.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231600&req=5

fig01: Interactions between management actions, goals, and outcome for the viability of captive and reinforced populations (A) and potential additional effects of sexual selection theories if female mate choice would be integrated to captive breeding programs (B). The direction of the linkages is from left to right unless otherwise specified by an arrowhead. Positive effects are indicated by a black line, negative effects by a red dashed line.

Mentions: Breeding histories and conservation goals vary for each species in captivity, and although this suggests genetic management should be tailored to each population relative to its specific short- and long-term program goals (Earnhardt 1999; Fa et al. 2011), most captive breeding programs for conservation utilize similar guidelines aimed at minimizing the rate of loss of genetic variability and inbreeding depression (Frankham et al. 2000; Fraser 2008; Wang and Ryman 2001; Williams and Hoffman 2009; see Fig.1a).


Can sexual selection theory inform genetic management of captive populations? A review.

Chargé R, Teplitsky C, Sorci G, Low M - Evol Appl (2014)

Interactions between management actions, goals, and outcome for the viability of captive and reinforced populations (A) and potential additional effects of sexual selection theories if female mate choice would be integrated to captive breeding programs (B). The direction of the linkages is from left to right unless otherwise specified by an arrowhead. Positive effects are indicated by a black line, negative effects by a red dashed line.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231600&req=5

fig01: Interactions between management actions, goals, and outcome for the viability of captive and reinforced populations (A) and potential additional effects of sexual selection theories if female mate choice would be integrated to captive breeding programs (B). The direction of the linkages is from left to right unless otherwise specified by an arrowhead. Positive effects are indicated by a black line, negative effects by a red dashed line.
Mentions: Breeding histories and conservation goals vary for each species in captivity, and although this suggests genetic management should be tailored to each population relative to its specific short- and long-term program goals (Earnhardt 1999; Fa et al. 2011), most captive breeding programs for conservation utilize similar guidelines aimed at minimizing the rate of loss of genetic variability and inbreeding depression (Frankham et al. 2000; Fraser 2008; Wang and Ryman 2001; Williams and Hoffman 2009; see Fig.1a).

Bottom Line: Because current genetic management is often only partly successful in achieving these goals, it has been suggested that management insights may be found in sexual selection theory (in particular, female mate choice).We review the theoretical and empirical literature and consider how female mate choice might influence captive breeding in the context of current genetic guidelines for different sexual selection theories (i.e., direct benefits, good genes, compatible genes, sexy sons).The application of female mate choice to captive breeding is in its infancy and requires a goal-oriented framework based on the needs of captive species management, so researchers can make honest assessments of the costs and benefits of such an approach, using simulations, model species and captive animal data.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological and Environmental Science, Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions, University of Jyväskylä Jyväskylä, Finland.

ABSTRACT
Captive breeding for conservation purposes presents a serious practical challenge because several conflicting genetic processes (i.e., inbreeding depression, random genetic drift and genetic adaptation to captivity) need to be managed in concert to maximize captive population persistence and reintroduction success probability. Because current genetic management is often only partly successful in achieving these goals, it has been suggested that management insights may be found in sexual selection theory (in particular, female mate choice). We review the theoretical and empirical literature and consider how female mate choice might influence captive breeding in the context of current genetic guidelines for different sexual selection theories (i.e., direct benefits, good genes, compatible genes, sexy sons). We show that while mate choice shows promise as a tool in captive breeding under certain conditions, for most species, there is currently too little theoretical and empirical evidence to provide any clear guidelines that would guarantee positive fitness outcomes and avoid conflicts with other genetic goals. The application of female mate choice to captive breeding is in its infancy and requires a goal-oriented framework based on the needs of captive species management, so researchers can make honest assessments of the costs and benefits of such an approach, using simulations, model species and captive animal data.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus