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Mammography: a review of records in the Department of Radiology at a National Referral Hospital in Uganda.

Kiguli-Malwadde E, Mubuuke RG, Bugeza S, Mutungi B - Pan Afr Med J (2014)

Bottom Line: The total number of patients was 382 with a mean age of 46 years.Majority presented with breast pain and masses.There is therefore need for governments in Uganda, but in other areas as well to support regular mammography screening as a way of reducing mortality from breast cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Breast cancer is one of the leading cancers amongst women world-wide. Although mortality has been reduced and survival rates increased in developed countries, mortality rates from breast cancer are still a major health challenge for many developing countries. In Uganda, there are no screening programmes and in many cases mammography is used for diagnostic purposes. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical presentations and mammographic breast density patterns amongst women that presented to the radiology department for mammography at a national referral hospital.

Methods: This was a retrospective study carried out at Mulago Hospital in Uganda between January 2011 and January 2012. Records for patients who had mammography during this period were reviewed.

Results: The total number of patients was 382 with a mean age of 46 years. Majority presented with breast pain and masses. Mammograms done were normal in majority of the women with fatty breast density dominating. In Uganda, mammography was mainly performed for diagnostic purposes.

Conclusion: There is no mammography screening programme in Uganda and many women cannot access the service due to its limited availability and costs despite its significance in breast cancer management. There is therefore need for governments in Uganda, but in other areas as well to support regular mammography screening as a way of reducing mortality from breast cancer.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Different reasons for visiting the doctor
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Figure 0003: Different reasons for visiting the doctor

Mentions: The main chief complaint were pain in either breast or both breasts (42%), breast mass (39%), Review of previous complaints (14%) (Figure 2). Key for chief complaint and reason for visiting the doctor included: LBM-Left breast mass; RBM- Right breast mass; PBB-Pain in both breasts; PLB-Pain in left breast. 148(39%) patients had lumps/mass while 222(58%) did not report lumps/masses in their breasts. 305(79%) patients reported discomfort, pain or soreness, while 377(98%) claimed the pain was not related to menstrual period (Figure 3). 80(21%) reported a discharge from the nipple with only 15(4%) claiming the discharge was bloody. 26(7%) reported skin or nipple retraction. 51(14%) had had breast biopsy or surgery. 39(10%) had a family history of breast cancer, of which 20(5%) from a 1st degree relative and 17(4%) from a 2nd degree relative (Figure 4).


Mammography: a review of records in the Department of Radiology at a National Referral Hospital in Uganda.

Kiguli-Malwadde E, Mubuuke RG, Bugeza S, Mutungi B - Pan Afr Med J (2014)

Different reasons for visiting the doctor
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231318&req=5

Figure 0003: Different reasons for visiting the doctor
Mentions: The main chief complaint were pain in either breast or both breasts (42%), breast mass (39%), Review of previous complaints (14%) (Figure 2). Key for chief complaint and reason for visiting the doctor included: LBM-Left breast mass; RBM- Right breast mass; PBB-Pain in both breasts; PLB-Pain in left breast. 148(39%) patients had lumps/mass while 222(58%) did not report lumps/masses in their breasts. 305(79%) patients reported discomfort, pain or soreness, while 377(98%) claimed the pain was not related to menstrual period (Figure 3). 80(21%) reported a discharge from the nipple with only 15(4%) claiming the discharge was bloody. 26(7%) reported skin or nipple retraction. 51(14%) had had breast biopsy or surgery. 39(10%) had a family history of breast cancer, of which 20(5%) from a 1st degree relative and 17(4%) from a 2nd degree relative (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: The total number of patients was 382 with a mean age of 46 years.Majority presented with breast pain and masses.There is therefore need for governments in Uganda, but in other areas as well to support regular mammography screening as a way of reducing mortality from breast cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Breast cancer is one of the leading cancers amongst women world-wide. Although mortality has been reduced and survival rates increased in developed countries, mortality rates from breast cancer are still a major health challenge for many developing countries. In Uganda, there are no screening programmes and in many cases mammography is used for diagnostic purposes. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical presentations and mammographic breast density patterns amongst women that presented to the radiology department for mammography at a national referral hospital.

Methods: This was a retrospective study carried out at Mulago Hospital in Uganda between January 2011 and January 2012. Records for patients who had mammography during this period were reviewed.

Results: The total number of patients was 382 with a mean age of 46 years. Majority presented with breast pain and masses. Mammograms done were normal in majority of the women with fatty breast density dominating. In Uganda, mammography was mainly performed for diagnostic purposes.

Conclusion: There is no mammography screening programme in Uganda and many women cannot access the service due to its limited availability and costs despite its significance in breast cancer management. There is therefore need for governments in Uganda, but in other areas as well to support regular mammography screening as a way of reducing mortality from breast cancer.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus