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Immunophenotyping of Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in Sudan.

Hamid KH, Elduma AH, Mohamed BM, Salih MM - Pan Afr Med J (2014)

Bottom Line: The most common site of NHLs in this study is the lymph node (40% of all specimens) followed by stomach (19.4%).Extranodal locations are the most common sites affected with T cell NHLs.In conclusion; this study confirmed the fundamental role of immunohistochemistry in diagnosis and classification of NHLs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Public Health Laboratory, Khartoum, Sudan.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) are heterogeneous group of malignant lymphoproliferative disorders.

Study objectives: This was a retrospective study aimed to classify NHLs into B cell and T cell types; in addition to demonstrate the histological patterns and correlate it with gender, age and site of the biopsy.

Methods: The study was conducted in Histopathology Department, National Heath Laboratory, during the period 2007-2010. Formalin fixed paraffin wax embedded tissue blocks which were diagnosed as NHLs by routine Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stain during the period 2000-2008 were used. Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stain were done. Immunohistochemistry stains performed according to Dako cytomation protocol 2007. Lymphoid markers which were used in this study are CD45 (LCA), CD20 (B cell marker), CD3 (T cell marker), CD15 and CD 30. Epithelial marker which was used is CK MNF116. The total number of samples collected was 66; two of them were excluded because of poor processing. Another two specimens were excluded because they are non-reactive with lymphoid markers. The remaining 62 specimens were confirmed to be NHLs and classified into B cell and T cell types.

Results: The study showed that B cell NHLs represented 87.1% while T cell NHLs were 12.9%. The Male: Female ratio was 1.6:1. The major affected age group was (47-67) years (38.1% of all specimens). The most frequent histological grade was intermediate grade NHLs (27% of all specimens). The most common site of NHLs in this study is the lymph node (40% of all specimens) followed by stomach (19.4%).

Conclusion: Extranodal locations are the most common sites affected with T cell NHLs. In conclusion; this study confirmed the fundamental role of immunohistochemistry in diagnosis and classification of NHLs.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Immunopheotyping of NHLs into B and T cell
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Figure 0001: Immunopheotyping of NHLs into B and T cell

Mentions: Sixty six paraffin blocks were collected retrospectively from archive of Histopathology Department in National Health Laboratory. These specimens were previously diagnosed as Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas (NHLs) using routine H&E stain. Two samples were excluded for their inadequate processing which were not suitable for performing immunohistochemistry stain. After use of immunohistochemistry another two samples were excluded because of their positivity for Cytokeratin (epithelial cell marker) and their non-reactivity for lymphoid marker LCA (Leukocyte Common Antigen). The study was performed in 62 specimens. The specimens were reviewed and the diagnosis were confirmed as NHLs then classified into B cell and T cell types using immunohistochemistry. Both sexes were included in this study, males constituted 38 cases (61.3%) while females were 24 cases (38.7%). Male: female ratio is 1.6:1. The ages of the study ranged from 5 years to 87 years. The mean age was 47 years. The age group (47-67) years showed higher incidence of NHLs, comprising 24 cases (38.7%). The age group (26-46) years showed the lowest incidence of NHLs, comprising 8 cases (12.9%). The sites of biopsies were as follow 25 cases (40.3%) lymph nodes followed by 12 cases (19.4%) stomach; while other sites of biopsy were 25 cases (40.3%). The most frequent type of lymph node in this study was the cervical lymph node which represents 9 cases (14.5%) of all site of specimens (Table 1). The other sites of biopsies revealed that the intestinal masses were constituted 5 cases (8%) of biopsy. The histological pattern of NHLs was graded into high grade, intermediate grade, low grade and others. The most frequent grade was intermediate grade NHLs which account 17 cases (27%). Immunoperoxidase technique was performed and revealed that 62 cases were positive for lymphoid marker Leucocytes Common Antigen (LCA), which were sub-divided into 54 cases (87.1%) reactive for CD20 (B cell marker) and 8 cases (12.9%) reactive for CD3 (T cell marker) (Figure 1, Figure 2, Figure 3). The association between NHLs and age showed that the age group (47-67) years representing higher incidence of B cell NHLs (23 cases), while the age group (26-46) years had lowest incidence of B cell NHLs (6 cases). The age groups (5-25) years and (47-67) years show the highest incidence of T cell NHL (Table 2) The relation between histological grade and age was that the age group (47-67) years showed eight cases the higher frequency of intermediate grade NHL while the age group (5-25) years show the higher frequency of high grade NHL six cases (Table 3) The distribution of B cell and T cell NHLs according to gender showed that 21 cases were female affected with B cell NHLs, while three cases were found to be having T cell NHLs. The study showed that 33 cases were males with B cell NHLs and 5 cases were males with T cell NHLs. Concerning the site of the biopsy and its association with B cell and T cell NHLs; the lymph nodes were accounted 22 cases with B cell and three cases with T cell NHLs, followed by stomach which were affected with 10 cases B cell NHLs and two cases with T cell NHL while all other sites of biopsy reported with 22 cases B cell NHLs and three cases T cell NHLs.


Immunophenotyping of Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in Sudan.

Hamid KH, Elduma AH, Mohamed BM, Salih MM - Pan Afr Med J (2014)

Immunopheotyping of NHLs into B and T cell
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231245&req=5

Figure 0001: Immunopheotyping of NHLs into B and T cell
Mentions: Sixty six paraffin blocks were collected retrospectively from archive of Histopathology Department in National Health Laboratory. These specimens were previously diagnosed as Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas (NHLs) using routine H&E stain. Two samples were excluded for their inadequate processing which were not suitable for performing immunohistochemistry stain. After use of immunohistochemistry another two samples were excluded because of their positivity for Cytokeratin (epithelial cell marker) and their non-reactivity for lymphoid marker LCA (Leukocyte Common Antigen). The study was performed in 62 specimens. The specimens were reviewed and the diagnosis were confirmed as NHLs then classified into B cell and T cell types using immunohistochemistry. Both sexes were included in this study, males constituted 38 cases (61.3%) while females were 24 cases (38.7%). Male: female ratio is 1.6:1. The ages of the study ranged from 5 years to 87 years. The mean age was 47 years. The age group (47-67) years showed higher incidence of NHLs, comprising 24 cases (38.7%). The age group (26-46) years showed the lowest incidence of NHLs, comprising 8 cases (12.9%). The sites of biopsies were as follow 25 cases (40.3%) lymph nodes followed by 12 cases (19.4%) stomach; while other sites of biopsy were 25 cases (40.3%). The most frequent type of lymph node in this study was the cervical lymph node which represents 9 cases (14.5%) of all site of specimens (Table 1). The other sites of biopsies revealed that the intestinal masses were constituted 5 cases (8%) of biopsy. The histological pattern of NHLs was graded into high grade, intermediate grade, low grade and others. The most frequent grade was intermediate grade NHLs which account 17 cases (27%). Immunoperoxidase technique was performed and revealed that 62 cases were positive for lymphoid marker Leucocytes Common Antigen (LCA), which were sub-divided into 54 cases (87.1%) reactive for CD20 (B cell marker) and 8 cases (12.9%) reactive for CD3 (T cell marker) (Figure 1, Figure 2, Figure 3). The association between NHLs and age showed that the age group (47-67) years representing higher incidence of B cell NHLs (23 cases), while the age group (26-46) years had lowest incidence of B cell NHLs (6 cases). The age groups (5-25) years and (47-67) years show the highest incidence of T cell NHL (Table 2) The relation between histological grade and age was that the age group (47-67) years showed eight cases the higher frequency of intermediate grade NHL while the age group (5-25) years show the higher frequency of high grade NHL six cases (Table 3) The distribution of B cell and T cell NHLs according to gender showed that 21 cases were female affected with B cell NHLs, while three cases were found to be having T cell NHLs. The study showed that 33 cases were males with B cell NHLs and 5 cases were males with T cell NHLs. Concerning the site of the biopsy and its association with B cell and T cell NHLs; the lymph nodes were accounted 22 cases with B cell and three cases with T cell NHLs, followed by stomach which were affected with 10 cases B cell NHLs and two cases with T cell NHL while all other sites of biopsy reported with 22 cases B cell NHLs and three cases T cell NHLs.

Bottom Line: The most common site of NHLs in this study is the lymph node (40% of all specimens) followed by stomach (19.4%).Extranodal locations are the most common sites affected with T cell NHLs.In conclusion; this study confirmed the fundamental role of immunohistochemistry in diagnosis and classification of NHLs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Public Health Laboratory, Khartoum, Sudan.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) are heterogeneous group of malignant lymphoproliferative disorders.

Study objectives: This was a retrospective study aimed to classify NHLs into B cell and T cell types; in addition to demonstrate the histological patterns and correlate it with gender, age and site of the biopsy.

Methods: The study was conducted in Histopathology Department, National Heath Laboratory, during the period 2007-2010. Formalin fixed paraffin wax embedded tissue blocks which were diagnosed as NHLs by routine Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stain during the period 2000-2008 were used. Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stain were done. Immunohistochemistry stains performed according to Dako cytomation protocol 2007. Lymphoid markers which were used in this study are CD45 (LCA), CD20 (B cell marker), CD3 (T cell marker), CD15 and CD 30. Epithelial marker which was used is CK MNF116. The total number of samples collected was 66; two of them were excluded because of poor processing. Another two specimens were excluded because they are non-reactive with lymphoid markers. The remaining 62 specimens were confirmed to be NHLs and classified into B cell and T cell types.

Results: The study showed that B cell NHLs represented 87.1% while T cell NHLs were 12.9%. The Male: Female ratio was 1.6:1. The major affected age group was (47-67) years (38.1% of all specimens). The most frequent histological grade was intermediate grade NHLs (27% of all specimens). The most common site of NHLs in this study is the lymph node (40% of all specimens) followed by stomach (19.4%).

Conclusion: Extranodal locations are the most common sites affected with T cell NHLs. In conclusion; this study confirmed the fundamental role of immunohistochemistry in diagnosis and classification of NHLs.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus