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Plasmonic molecules via glass annealing in hydrogen.

Redkov A, Chervinskii S, Baklanov A, Reduto I, Zhurikhina V, Lipovskii A - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

Bottom Line: Growth of self-assembled metal nanoislands on the surface of silver ion-exchanged glasses via their thermal processing in hydrogen followed by out-diffusion of neutral silver is studied.The combination of thermal poling of the ion-exchanged glass with structured electrode and silver out-diffusion was used for simple formation of separated groups of several metal nanoislands presenting plasmonic molecules.The kinetics of nanoisland formation and temporal evolution of their size distribution on the surface of poled and unpoled glass are modeled. 78.67.Sc (nanoaggregates; nanocomposites); 81.16.Dn (self-assembly); 68.35.bj (surface structure of glasses); 64.60.Qb (Nucleation); 81.16.Nd (micro- and nanolithography).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Physics, Nanotechnology and Telecommunications, St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, 29 Polytechnicheskaya, St. Petersburg 195251, Russia ; Department of Physics and Technology of Nanostructures, St. Petersburg Academic University, 8/3 Khlopina, St. Petersburg 194021, Russia.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Growth of self-assembled metal nanoislands on the surface of silver ion-exchanged glasses via their thermal processing in hydrogen followed by out-diffusion of neutral silver is studied. The combination of thermal poling of the ion-exchanged glass with structured electrode and silver out-diffusion was used for simple formation of separated groups of several metal nanoislands presenting plasmonic molecules. The kinetics of nanoisland formation and temporal evolution of their size distribution on the surface of poled and unpoled glass are modeled.

Pacs: 78.67.Sc (nanoaggregates; nanocomposites); 81.16.Dn (self-assembly); 68.35.bj (surface structure of glasses); 64.60.Qb (Nucleation); 81.16.Nd (micro- and nanolithography).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

AFM images of silver nanoislands on the surface of the glass annealed in hydrogen. AFM images of MIF on the surface of the glass annealed in hydrogen for 10 min (a), 20 min (b), and 330 min (c) at 100°C. The glass slides were ion-exchanged in the bath containing 5 wt.% of AgNO3 and 95 wt.% of NaNO3 at 325°C for 20 min.
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Figure 1: AFM images of silver nanoislands on the surface of the glass annealed in hydrogen. AFM images of MIF on the surface of the glass annealed in hydrogen for 10 min (a), 20 min (b), and 330 min (c) at 100°C. The glass slides were ion-exchanged in the bath containing 5 wt.% of AgNO3 and 95 wt.% of NaNO3 at 325°C for 20 min.

Mentions: In the experiments, we used Menzel [15] microscope slides; the ion-exchanged process is described in details in [11]. The use of ion-exchange bath containing 5 wt.% of AgNO3 and 95 wt.% of NaNO3 allowed us to replace of approximately 75 wt.% of sodium by silver at the glass surface as followed from our previous studies of silver-sodium ion exchange in soda-lime glasses [16]. Chosen temperature and duration of the ion exchange indicated in Figure 1 caption corresponded to the penetration of silver ions into the glass by 7 μm with the half of maximum concentration at approximately 3.5 μm [16]. Varying hydrogen annealing conditions, we found the mode providing the formation of MIF with clearly separated nanoparticles as shown in Figure 1a,b while essentially longer annealing resulted in the layer of closely packed nanoparticles (Figure 1c). Visually smaller size of the metal islands in Figure 1c is probably because of atomic force microscope tip artifact [17], that is, the decrease of atomic force microscopy (AFM)-measured size for closer placed nanoparticles. This takes place when the average distance between the nanoparticles does not allow the AFM tip to touch substrate everywhere because it is less than the AFM tip edge. Increased thickness of the MIF in Figure 1c also does not indicate the decreased size of the nanoparticles. The images of MIF presented in Figure 1 were obtained using atomic force microscope Veeco Dimension 3100 (AFM; Veeco Instruments Inc., Plainview, NY, USA).


Plasmonic molecules via glass annealing in hydrogen.

Redkov A, Chervinskii S, Baklanov A, Reduto I, Zhurikhina V, Lipovskii A - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

AFM images of silver nanoislands on the surface of the glass annealed in hydrogen. AFM images of MIF on the surface of the glass annealed in hydrogen for 10 min (a), 20 min (b), and 330 min (c) at 100°C. The glass slides were ion-exchanged in the bath containing 5 wt.% of AgNO3 and 95 wt.% of NaNO3 at 325°C for 20 min.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231197&req=5

Figure 1: AFM images of silver nanoislands on the surface of the glass annealed in hydrogen. AFM images of MIF on the surface of the glass annealed in hydrogen for 10 min (a), 20 min (b), and 330 min (c) at 100°C. The glass slides were ion-exchanged in the bath containing 5 wt.% of AgNO3 and 95 wt.% of NaNO3 at 325°C for 20 min.
Mentions: In the experiments, we used Menzel [15] microscope slides; the ion-exchanged process is described in details in [11]. The use of ion-exchange bath containing 5 wt.% of AgNO3 and 95 wt.% of NaNO3 allowed us to replace of approximately 75 wt.% of sodium by silver at the glass surface as followed from our previous studies of silver-sodium ion exchange in soda-lime glasses [16]. Chosen temperature and duration of the ion exchange indicated in Figure 1 caption corresponded to the penetration of silver ions into the glass by 7 μm with the half of maximum concentration at approximately 3.5 μm [16]. Varying hydrogen annealing conditions, we found the mode providing the formation of MIF with clearly separated nanoparticles as shown in Figure 1a,b while essentially longer annealing resulted in the layer of closely packed nanoparticles (Figure 1c). Visually smaller size of the metal islands in Figure 1c is probably because of atomic force microscope tip artifact [17], that is, the decrease of atomic force microscopy (AFM)-measured size for closer placed nanoparticles. This takes place when the average distance between the nanoparticles does not allow the AFM tip to touch substrate everywhere because it is less than the AFM tip edge. Increased thickness of the MIF in Figure 1c also does not indicate the decreased size of the nanoparticles. The images of MIF presented in Figure 1 were obtained using atomic force microscope Veeco Dimension 3100 (AFM; Veeco Instruments Inc., Plainview, NY, USA).

Bottom Line: Growth of self-assembled metal nanoislands on the surface of silver ion-exchanged glasses via their thermal processing in hydrogen followed by out-diffusion of neutral silver is studied.The combination of thermal poling of the ion-exchanged glass with structured electrode and silver out-diffusion was used for simple formation of separated groups of several metal nanoislands presenting plasmonic molecules.The kinetics of nanoisland formation and temporal evolution of their size distribution on the surface of poled and unpoled glass are modeled. 78.67.Sc (nanoaggregates; nanocomposites); 81.16.Dn (self-assembly); 68.35.bj (surface structure of glasses); 64.60.Qb (Nucleation); 81.16.Nd (micro- and nanolithography).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Physics, Nanotechnology and Telecommunications, St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, 29 Polytechnicheskaya, St. Petersburg 195251, Russia ; Department of Physics and Technology of Nanostructures, St. Petersburg Academic University, 8/3 Khlopina, St. Petersburg 194021, Russia.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Growth of self-assembled metal nanoislands on the surface of silver ion-exchanged glasses via their thermal processing in hydrogen followed by out-diffusion of neutral silver is studied. The combination of thermal poling of the ion-exchanged glass with structured electrode and silver out-diffusion was used for simple formation of separated groups of several metal nanoislands presenting plasmonic molecules. The kinetics of nanoisland formation and temporal evolution of their size distribution on the surface of poled and unpoled glass are modeled.

Pacs: 78.67.Sc (nanoaggregates; nanocomposites); 81.16.Dn (self-assembly); 68.35.bj (surface structure of glasses); 64.60.Qb (Nucleation); 81.16.Nd (micro- and nanolithography).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus