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Surgical and antimicrobial treatment of prosthetic vascular graft infections at different surgical sites: a retrospective study of treatment outcomes.

Erb S, Sidler JA, Elzi L, Gurke L, Battegay M, Widmer AF, Weisser M - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Cases of possible prosthetic vascular graft infection were identified from the hospital's infectious diseases database and evaluated against strict diagnostic criteria.Statistical analyses included evaluation of patient and infection characteristics, time to treatment failure, and factors associated specifically with cure rates in aortic graft infections.In uni- and multivariate analysis, the type of surgical intervention used in managing infections (graft retention versus graft replacement) did not affect primary outcome, whereas a rifampicin-based antimicrobial regimen was associated with a higher cure rate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Infectious Diseases and Hospital Epidemiology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Department of Clinical Research, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Little is known about optimal management of prosthetic vascular graft infections, which are a rare but serious complication associated with graft implants. The goal of this study was to compare and characterize these infections with respect to the location of the graft and to identify factors associated with outcome.

Methods: This was a retrospective study over more than a decade at a tertiary care university hospital that has an established multidisciplinary approach to treating graft infections. Cases of possible prosthetic vascular graft infection were identified from the hospital's infectious diseases database and evaluated against strict diagnostic criteria. Patients were divided into groups according to the locations of their grafts: thoracic-aortic, abdominal-aortic, or peripheral-arterial. Statistical analyses included evaluation of patient and infection characteristics, time to treatment failure, and factors associated specifically with cure rates in aortic graft infections. The primary endpoint was cure at one year after diagnosis of the infection.

Results: Characterization of graft infections according to the graft location did show that these infections differ in terms of their characteristics and that the prognosis for treatment seems to be influenced by the location of the infection. Cure rate and all-cause mortality at one year were 87.5% and 12.5% in 24 patients with thoracic-aortic graft infections, 37.0% and 55.6% in 27 patients with abdominal-aortic graft infections, and 70.0% and 30.0% in 10 patients with peripheral-arterial graft infections. In uni- and multivariate analysis, the type of surgical intervention used in managing infections (graft retention versus graft replacement) did not affect primary outcome, whereas a rifampicin-based antimicrobial regimen was associated with a higher cure rate.

Conclusions: We recommend that future prospective studies differentiate prosthetic vascular graft infections according to the location of the grafts and that rifampicin-based antimicrobial regimens be evaluated in clinical trials involving vascular graft infections caused by staphylococci.

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Comparison of time to treatment failure in different types of prosthetic vascular graft infections.Infections are compared with respect to the location of the prosthetic vascular graft using Kaplan-Meier estimates.
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pone-0112947-g002: Comparison of time to treatment failure in different types of prosthetic vascular graft infections.Infections are compared with respect to the location of the prosthetic vascular graft using Kaplan-Meier estimates.

Mentions: Treatment failure usually occurred within the first 3 months after diagnosis of the infection, and in case of an abdominal PVGI, frequently happened within the first month after diagnosis (Figure 2). When treatment for a PVGI failed, it was always fatal except in the case of two patients with abdominal PVGI who survived, one with a persistent abscess and one with an aorto-duodenal fistula.


Surgical and antimicrobial treatment of prosthetic vascular graft infections at different surgical sites: a retrospective study of treatment outcomes.

Erb S, Sidler JA, Elzi L, Gurke L, Battegay M, Widmer AF, Weisser M - PLoS ONE (2014)

Comparison of time to treatment failure in different types of prosthetic vascular graft infections.Infections are compared with respect to the location of the prosthetic vascular graft using Kaplan-Meier estimates.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231097&req=5

pone-0112947-g002: Comparison of time to treatment failure in different types of prosthetic vascular graft infections.Infections are compared with respect to the location of the prosthetic vascular graft using Kaplan-Meier estimates.
Mentions: Treatment failure usually occurred within the first 3 months after diagnosis of the infection, and in case of an abdominal PVGI, frequently happened within the first month after diagnosis (Figure 2). When treatment for a PVGI failed, it was always fatal except in the case of two patients with abdominal PVGI who survived, one with a persistent abscess and one with an aorto-duodenal fistula.

Bottom Line: Cases of possible prosthetic vascular graft infection were identified from the hospital's infectious diseases database and evaluated against strict diagnostic criteria.Statistical analyses included evaluation of patient and infection characteristics, time to treatment failure, and factors associated specifically with cure rates in aortic graft infections.In uni- and multivariate analysis, the type of surgical intervention used in managing infections (graft retention versus graft replacement) did not affect primary outcome, whereas a rifampicin-based antimicrobial regimen was associated with a higher cure rate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Infectious Diseases and Hospital Epidemiology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Department of Clinical Research, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Little is known about optimal management of prosthetic vascular graft infections, which are a rare but serious complication associated with graft implants. The goal of this study was to compare and characterize these infections with respect to the location of the graft and to identify factors associated with outcome.

Methods: This was a retrospective study over more than a decade at a tertiary care university hospital that has an established multidisciplinary approach to treating graft infections. Cases of possible prosthetic vascular graft infection were identified from the hospital's infectious diseases database and evaluated against strict diagnostic criteria. Patients were divided into groups according to the locations of their grafts: thoracic-aortic, abdominal-aortic, or peripheral-arterial. Statistical analyses included evaluation of patient and infection characteristics, time to treatment failure, and factors associated specifically with cure rates in aortic graft infections. The primary endpoint was cure at one year after diagnosis of the infection.

Results: Characterization of graft infections according to the graft location did show that these infections differ in terms of their characteristics and that the prognosis for treatment seems to be influenced by the location of the infection. Cure rate and all-cause mortality at one year were 87.5% and 12.5% in 24 patients with thoracic-aortic graft infections, 37.0% and 55.6% in 27 patients with abdominal-aortic graft infections, and 70.0% and 30.0% in 10 patients with peripheral-arterial graft infections. In uni- and multivariate analysis, the type of surgical intervention used in managing infections (graft retention versus graft replacement) did not affect primary outcome, whereas a rifampicin-based antimicrobial regimen was associated with a higher cure rate.

Conclusions: We recommend that future prospective studies differentiate prosthetic vascular graft infections according to the location of the grafts and that rifampicin-based antimicrobial regimens be evaluated in clinical trials involving vascular graft infections caused by staphylococci.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus