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Seasonal variability in airborne biotic contaminants in swine confinement buildings.

Kumari P, Choi HL - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Microclimatic variables of SCBs, particularly air speed, PM2.5 and total suspended particles (TSP) were found significantly correlated to abundances, community composition, and diversity of bacterial bioaerosols.Overall, our results indicate that biotic contaminants in SCBs exhibit seasonal trends, and these could be associated with the microclimatic variables of SCBs.The correlations established in the current study could be helpful in establishing better management strategies to minimize the potential health impacts on both livestock and humans working in this environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Science, Seoul National University, Gwanak, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Little is known about the seasonal dynamics of biotic contaminants in swine confinement buildings (SCBs). The biotic contaminants of seven SCBs were monitored during one visit in the winter and one during the summer. Paired-end Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, V3 region, was used to examine seasonal shifts in bacterial community composition and diversity. The abundances of 16S rRNA genes and six tetracycline resistance genes (tetB, tetH, tetZ, tetO, tetQ, and tetW) were also quantified using real-time PCR. Bacterial abundances, community composition and diversity all showed strong seasonal patterns defined by winter peaks in abundance and diversity. Microclimatic variables of SCBs, particularly air speed, PM2.5 and total suspended particles (TSP) were found significantly correlated to abundances, community composition, and diversity of bacterial bioaerosols. Seasonal fluctuations were also observed for four tetracycline resistance genes, tetH, tetO, tetQ, and tetW. The frequency of occurrences of these resistance genes were significantly higher in samples collected during winter and was also significantly correlated with air speed, PM2.5 and TSP. Overall, our results indicate that biotic contaminants in SCBs exhibit seasonal trends, and these could be associated with the microclimatic variables of SCBs. The correlations established in the current study could be helpful in establishing better management strategies to minimize the potential health impacts on both livestock and humans working in this environment.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Abundance of 16S rRNA and tetracycline resistance genes in the bioaerosols of SCBs.Asterisks above solid lines indicate significant differences between the winter and summer seasons samples of SCBs. * indicates significantly different at >0.05, ** indicates at >0.01.
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pone-0112897-g004: Abundance of 16S rRNA and tetracycline resistance genes in the bioaerosols of SCBs.Asterisks above solid lines indicate significant differences between the winter and summer seasons samples of SCBs. * indicates significantly different at >0.05, ** indicates at >0.01.

Mentions: The abundances of 16S rRNA genes in the bioaerosols of SCBs were significantly higher in the winter (mean = 1.4×108 bacteria m−3, n = 7, P<0.01, Fig. 4) than in the summer (mean = 1.2×107 bacteria m−3, P<0.01, n = 7, Fig. 4). Six classes of TcR genes (tetB, tetH, tetZ, tetO, tetQ, and tetW) were further quantified using qPCR. All six classes of TcR genes were detected in high abundance in both winter and summer bioaerosol samples (Fig. 4). TcR genes encoding RPP (tetO, tetQ and tetW) were present in significantly higher copy numbers than TcR encoding EFP (tetB, tetH and tetZ; t-test, P-value = 0.04). Seasonal trends were also detected in four TcR genes, which include tetH, tetO, tetQ, and tetW, and their abundances peaked in bioaerosol samples collected during the winter (Fig. 4). Among the six microclimate variables, air speed was found negatively correlated (P<0.05) with the abundances of 16S rRNA, tetH, tetO, tetQ, and tetW genes (Table 3), however, PM2.5 and TSP were found positively correlated (P<0.05) with these genes (Table 3).


Seasonal variability in airborne biotic contaminants in swine confinement buildings.

Kumari P, Choi HL - PLoS ONE (2014)

Abundance of 16S rRNA and tetracycline resistance genes in the bioaerosols of SCBs.Asterisks above solid lines indicate significant differences between the winter and summer seasons samples of SCBs. * indicates significantly different at >0.05, ** indicates at >0.01.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231085&req=5

pone-0112897-g004: Abundance of 16S rRNA and tetracycline resistance genes in the bioaerosols of SCBs.Asterisks above solid lines indicate significant differences between the winter and summer seasons samples of SCBs. * indicates significantly different at >0.05, ** indicates at >0.01.
Mentions: The abundances of 16S rRNA genes in the bioaerosols of SCBs were significantly higher in the winter (mean = 1.4×108 bacteria m−3, n = 7, P<0.01, Fig. 4) than in the summer (mean = 1.2×107 bacteria m−3, P<0.01, n = 7, Fig. 4). Six classes of TcR genes (tetB, tetH, tetZ, tetO, tetQ, and tetW) were further quantified using qPCR. All six classes of TcR genes were detected in high abundance in both winter and summer bioaerosol samples (Fig. 4). TcR genes encoding RPP (tetO, tetQ and tetW) were present in significantly higher copy numbers than TcR encoding EFP (tetB, tetH and tetZ; t-test, P-value = 0.04). Seasonal trends were also detected in four TcR genes, which include tetH, tetO, tetQ, and tetW, and their abundances peaked in bioaerosol samples collected during the winter (Fig. 4). Among the six microclimate variables, air speed was found negatively correlated (P<0.05) with the abundances of 16S rRNA, tetH, tetO, tetQ, and tetW genes (Table 3), however, PM2.5 and TSP were found positively correlated (P<0.05) with these genes (Table 3).

Bottom Line: Microclimatic variables of SCBs, particularly air speed, PM2.5 and total suspended particles (TSP) were found significantly correlated to abundances, community composition, and diversity of bacterial bioaerosols.Overall, our results indicate that biotic contaminants in SCBs exhibit seasonal trends, and these could be associated with the microclimatic variables of SCBs.The correlations established in the current study could be helpful in establishing better management strategies to minimize the potential health impacts on both livestock and humans working in this environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Science, Seoul National University, Gwanak, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Little is known about the seasonal dynamics of biotic contaminants in swine confinement buildings (SCBs). The biotic contaminants of seven SCBs were monitored during one visit in the winter and one during the summer. Paired-end Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, V3 region, was used to examine seasonal shifts in bacterial community composition and diversity. The abundances of 16S rRNA genes and six tetracycline resistance genes (tetB, tetH, tetZ, tetO, tetQ, and tetW) were also quantified using real-time PCR. Bacterial abundances, community composition and diversity all showed strong seasonal patterns defined by winter peaks in abundance and diversity. Microclimatic variables of SCBs, particularly air speed, PM2.5 and total suspended particles (TSP) were found significantly correlated to abundances, community composition, and diversity of bacterial bioaerosols. Seasonal fluctuations were also observed for four tetracycline resistance genes, tetH, tetO, tetQ, and tetW. The frequency of occurrences of these resistance genes were significantly higher in samples collected during winter and was also significantly correlated with air speed, PM2.5 and TSP. Overall, our results indicate that biotic contaminants in SCBs exhibit seasonal trends, and these could be associated with the microclimatic variables of SCBs. The correlations established in the current study could be helpful in establishing better management strategies to minimize the potential health impacts on both livestock and humans working in this environment.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus