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The great roundleaf bat (Hipposideros armiger) as a good model for cold-induced browning of intra-abdominal white adipose tissue.

Wang Y, Zhu T, Ke S, Fang N, Irwin DM, Lei M, Zhang J, Shi H, Zhang S, Wang Z - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Adipocyte diameters of WATs became significantly reduced and the white adipocytes became brown-like in morphology.Interestingly, the rickett's big-footed bat did not show such a tendency in beige fat.Combined with rodent models, this model should be helpful for finding therapies for reducing harmful aWAT in humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Molecular Ecology and Evolution, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Inducing beige fat from white adipose tissue (WAT) is considered to be a shortcut to weight loss and increasingly becoming a key area in research into treatments for obesity and related diseases. However, currently, animal models of beige fat are restricted to rodents, where subcutaneous adipose tissue (sWAT, benign WAT) is more liable to develop into the beige fat under specific activators than the intra-abdominal adipose tissue (aWAT, malignant WAT) that is the major source of obesity related diseases in humans.

Methods: Here we induced beige fat by cold exposure in two species of bats, the great roundleaf bat (Hipposideros armiger) and the rickett's big-footed bat (Myotis ricketti), and compared the molecular and morphological changes with those seen in the mouse. Expression of thermogenic genes (Ucp1 and Pgc1a) was measured by RT-qPCR and adipocyte morphology examined by HE staining at three adipose locations, sWAT, aWAT and iBAT (interscapular brown adipose tissue).

Results: Expression of Ucp1 and Pgc1a was significantly upregulated, by 729 and 23 fold, respectively, in aWAT of the great roundleaf bat after exposure to 10°C for 7 days. Adipocyte diameters of WATs became significantly reduced and the white adipocytes became brown-like in morphology. In mice, similar changes were found in the sWAT, but much lower amounts of changes in aWAT were seen. Interestingly, the rickett's big-footed bat did not show such a tendency in beige fat.

Conclusions: The great roundleaf bat is potentially a good animal model for human aWAT browning research. Combined with rodent models, this model should be helpful for finding therapies for reducing harmful aWAT in humans.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Roosting of great roundleaf bats and rickett's big-footed bats in the wild.(a) Great roundleaf bats hung in caves by their foot claws. (b) Ricketts big-footed bats crowded in the caves. (c) An enlarged view of a group of the Ricketts big-footed bats. They attached their entire ventral surface of their bodies to the rock surface or to another individual's back.
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pone-0112495-g001: Roosting of great roundleaf bats and rickett's big-footed bats in the wild.(a) Great roundleaf bats hung in caves by their foot claws. (b) Ricketts big-footed bats crowded in the caves. (c) An enlarged view of a group of the Ricketts big-footed bats. They attached their entire ventral surface of their bodies to the rock surface or to another individual's back.

Mentions: Adult great roundleaf bats (H. armiger) were captured from Yulong Cave in Anhui province, China (30°20′N, 117°50′E), and adult rickett's big-footed bats (M. ricketti) were captured from Fangshan Cave in Beijing, China (39°42′N, 115°43′E; Figure 1). Bats were immediately transported to the laboratory and housed in a large pet cage (150 cm×180 cm×200 cm) with free access to fresh mealworm (Larval Tenebrio molitor) and water. Outbred mice ICR were obtained from SLAC Laboratory Animal (Shanghai, China).


The great roundleaf bat (Hipposideros armiger) as a good model for cold-induced browning of intra-abdominal white adipose tissue.

Wang Y, Zhu T, Ke S, Fang N, Irwin DM, Lei M, Zhang J, Shi H, Zhang S, Wang Z - PLoS ONE (2014)

Roosting of great roundleaf bats and rickett's big-footed bats in the wild.(a) Great roundleaf bats hung in caves by their foot claws. (b) Ricketts big-footed bats crowded in the caves. (c) An enlarged view of a group of the Ricketts big-footed bats. They attached their entire ventral surface of their bodies to the rock surface or to another individual's back.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231071&req=5

pone-0112495-g001: Roosting of great roundleaf bats and rickett's big-footed bats in the wild.(a) Great roundleaf bats hung in caves by their foot claws. (b) Ricketts big-footed bats crowded in the caves. (c) An enlarged view of a group of the Ricketts big-footed bats. They attached their entire ventral surface of their bodies to the rock surface or to another individual's back.
Mentions: Adult great roundleaf bats (H. armiger) were captured from Yulong Cave in Anhui province, China (30°20′N, 117°50′E), and adult rickett's big-footed bats (M. ricketti) were captured from Fangshan Cave in Beijing, China (39°42′N, 115°43′E; Figure 1). Bats were immediately transported to the laboratory and housed in a large pet cage (150 cm×180 cm×200 cm) with free access to fresh mealworm (Larval Tenebrio molitor) and water. Outbred mice ICR were obtained from SLAC Laboratory Animal (Shanghai, China).

Bottom Line: Adipocyte diameters of WATs became significantly reduced and the white adipocytes became brown-like in morphology.Interestingly, the rickett's big-footed bat did not show such a tendency in beige fat.Combined with rodent models, this model should be helpful for finding therapies for reducing harmful aWAT in humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Molecular Ecology and Evolution, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Inducing beige fat from white adipose tissue (WAT) is considered to be a shortcut to weight loss and increasingly becoming a key area in research into treatments for obesity and related diseases. However, currently, animal models of beige fat are restricted to rodents, where subcutaneous adipose tissue (sWAT, benign WAT) is more liable to develop into the beige fat under specific activators than the intra-abdominal adipose tissue (aWAT, malignant WAT) that is the major source of obesity related diseases in humans.

Methods: Here we induced beige fat by cold exposure in two species of bats, the great roundleaf bat (Hipposideros armiger) and the rickett's big-footed bat (Myotis ricketti), and compared the molecular and morphological changes with those seen in the mouse. Expression of thermogenic genes (Ucp1 and Pgc1a) was measured by RT-qPCR and adipocyte morphology examined by HE staining at three adipose locations, sWAT, aWAT and iBAT (interscapular brown adipose tissue).

Results: Expression of Ucp1 and Pgc1a was significantly upregulated, by 729 and 23 fold, respectively, in aWAT of the great roundleaf bat after exposure to 10°C for 7 days. Adipocyte diameters of WATs became significantly reduced and the white adipocytes became brown-like in morphology. In mice, similar changes were found in the sWAT, but much lower amounts of changes in aWAT were seen. Interestingly, the rickett's big-footed bat did not show such a tendency in beige fat.

Conclusions: The great roundleaf bat is potentially a good animal model for human aWAT browning research. Combined with rodent models, this model should be helpful for finding therapies for reducing harmful aWAT in humans.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus