Limits...
Radial growth of two dominant montane conifer tree species in response to climate change in North-Central China.

Jiang Y, Zhang W, Wang M, Kang M, Dong M - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Based on a tree-ring analysis of 292 increment cores sampled from 146 trees at different elevations, this study aimed to examine if the radial growth of the two species in response to climate is similar, whether the responses are consistent along altitudinal gradients and which species might be favored in the future driven by the changing climate.The results indicated the following: (1) The two species grew in different rhythms at low and high elevation respectively; (2) Both species displayed inconsistent relationships between radial growth and climate data along altitudinal gradients.These indicate the different influences of the horizontal climate and vertical mountainous climate on the radial growth of the two species; (3) The species-dependent different response to climate in radial growth appeared mainly in autumn of the previous year.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China; Key Laboratory of Traditional Chinese Medicine Protection and Utilization, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China; College of Resources Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
North-Central China is a region in which the air temperature has clearly increased for several decades. Picea meyeri and Larix principis-rupprechtii are the most dominant co-occurring tree species within the cold coniferous forest belt ranging vertically from 1800 m to 2800 m a.s.l. in this region. Based on a tree-ring analysis of 292 increment cores sampled from 146 trees at different elevations, this study aimed to examine if the radial growth of the two species in response to climate is similar, whether the responses are consistent along altitudinal gradients and which species might be favored in the future driven by the changing climate. The results indicated the following: (1) The two species grew in different rhythms at low and high elevation respectively; (2) Both species displayed inconsistent relationships between radial growth and climate data along altitudinal gradients. The correlation between radial growth and the monthly mean temperature in the spring or summer changed from negative at low elevation into positive at high elevation, whereas those between the radial growth and the total monthly precipitation displayed a change from positive into negative along the elevation gradient. These indicate the different influences of the horizontal climate and vertical mountainous climate on the radial growth of the two species; (3) The species-dependent different response to climate in radial growth appeared mainly in autumn of the previous year. The radial growth of L. principis-rupprechtii displayed negative responses both to temperature and to precipitation in the previous September, October or November, which was not observed in the radial growth of P. meyeri. (4) The radial growth of both species will tend to be increased at high elevation and limited at low elevation, and L. principis-rupprechtii might be more favored in the future, if the temperature keeps rising.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Results from correlation analyses on tree-ring width indices with monthly meteorological data.The dashed lines indicate a significance level of 0.05. r and p at the top left represent the correlation coefficients between the two data series in each field and the corresponding significance level. This level indicates the similarity of the growth-climate relationship between two species.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231039&req=5

pone-0112537-g002: Results from correlation analyses on tree-ring width indices with monthly meteorological data.The dashed lines indicate a significance level of 0.05. r and p at the top left represent the correlation coefficients between the two data series in each field and the corresponding significance level. This level indicates the similarity of the growth-climate relationship between two species.

Mentions: The growth-climate relationship was examined using the data of total monthly precipitation and monthly mean temperature for the period from 1978 to 2007. The similarity of the growth-climate relationship between the two species at each site was evaluated again through correlation analysis using two datasets, one of which was formed by the correlation coefficient between monthly meteorological data and tree-ring width indices of P. meyeri and the other by those of L. principis-rupprechtii (Fig. 2). The results indicated that P. meyeri and L. principis-rupprechtii displayed a similar response to the monthly mean temperature in radial growth at the lowest (r = 0.576, p<0.05), the higher and the highest sites (r≥0.767, p<0.01), whereas there was a response to total monthly precipitation only at the higher (r = 0.677, p<0.05) and the highest sites (r = 0.736, p<0.01). Both species appeared to have similar responses to total monthly precipitation at the lowest site, but the significance level for the test statistic reached, however, only to 0.1 (r = 0.544, p<0.1).


Radial growth of two dominant montane conifer tree species in response to climate change in North-Central China.

Jiang Y, Zhang W, Wang M, Kang M, Dong M - PLoS ONE (2014)

Results from correlation analyses on tree-ring width indices with monthly meteorological data.The dashed lines indicate a significance level of 0.05. r and p at the top left represent the correlation coefficients between the two data series in each field and the corresponding significance level. This level indicates the similarity of the growth-climate relationship between two species.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231039&req=5

pone-0112537-g002: Results from correlation analyses on tree-ring width indices with monthly meteorological data.The dashed lines indicate a significance level of 0.05. r and p at the top left represent the correlation coefficients between the two data series in each field and the corresponding significance level. This level indicates the similarity of the growth-climate relationship between two species.
Mentions: The growth-climate relationship was examined using the data of total monthly precipitation and monthly mean temperature for the period from 1978 to 2007. The similarity of the growth-climate relationship between the two species at each site was evaluated again through correlation analysis using two datasets, one of which was formed by the correlation coefficient between monthly meteorological data and tree-ring width indices of P. meyeri and the other by those of L. principis-rupprechtii (Fig. 2). The results indicated that P. meyeri and L. principis-rupprechtii displayed a similar response to the monthly mean temperature in radial growth at the lowest (r = 0.576, p<0.05), the higher and the highest sites (r≥0.767, p<0.01), whereas there was a response to total monthly precipitation only at the higher (r = 0.677, p<0.05) and the highest sites (r = 0.736, p<0.01). Both species appeared to have similar responses to total monthly precipitation at the lowest site, but the significance level for the test statistic reached, however, only to 0.1 (r = 0.544, p<0.1).

Bottom Line: Based on a tree-ring analysis of 292 increment cores sampled from 146 trees at different elevations, this study aimed to examine if the radial growth of the two species in response to climate is similar, whether the responses are consistent along altitudinal gradients and which species might be favored in the future driven by the changing climate.The results indicated the following: (1) The two species grew in different rhythms at low and high elevation respectively; (2) Both species displayed inconsistent relationships between radial growth and climate data along altitudinal gradients.These indicate the different influences of the horizontal climate and vertical mountainous climate on the radial growth of the two species; (3) The species-dependent different response to climate in radial growth appeared mainly in autumn of the previous year.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China; Key Laboratory of Traditional Chinese Medicine Protection and Utilization, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China; College of Resources Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
North-Central China is a region in which the air temperature has clearly increased for several decades. Picea meyeri and Larix principis-rupprechtii are the most dominant co-occurring tree species within the cold coniferous forest belt ranging vertically from 1800 m to 2800 m a.s.l. in this region. Based on a tree-ring analysis of 292 increment cores sampled from 146 trees at different elevations, this study aimed to examine if the radial growth of the two species in response to climate is similar, whether the responses are consistent along altitudinal gradients and which species might be favored in the future driven by the changing climate. The results indicated the following: (1) The two species grew in different rhythms at low and high elevation respectively; (2) Both species displayed inconsistent relationships between radial growth and climate data along altitudinal gradients. The correlation between radial growth and the monthly mean temperature in the spring or summer changed from negative at low elevation into positive at high elevation, whereas those between the radial growth and the total monthly precipitation displayed a change from positive into negative along the elevation gradient. These indicate the different influences of the horizontal climate and vertical mountainous climate on the radial growth of the two species; (3) The species-dependent different response to climate in radial growth appeared mainly in autumn of the previous year. The radial growth of L. principis-rupprechtii displayed negative responses both to temperature and to precipitation in the previous September, October or November, which was not observed in the radial growth of P. meyeri. (4) The radial growth of both species will tend to be increased at high elevation and limited at low elevation, and L. principis-rupprechtii might be more favored in the future, if the temperature keeps rising.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus