Limits...
Outcome of assisted reproductive technology (ART) and subsequent self-reported life satisfaction.

Kuivasaari-Pirinen P, Koivumaa-Honkanen H, Hippeläinen M, Raatikainen K, Heinonen S - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: In general, women who achieved a live birth after ART had a significantly higher life satisfaction than those who had unsuccessful ART, especially when compared in the first three years.The unsuccessfully treated women who had a child by some other means before or after the unsuccessful ART had comparable life satisfaction with successfully treated women even earlier.Even if unsuccessful ART outcome is associated with subsequent lower level of life satisfaction, it does not seem to threaten the long-term wellbeing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To compare life satisfaction between women with successful or unsuccessful outcome after assisted reproductive treatment (ART) by taking into account the time since the last ART.

Design: Cohort study.

Setting: Tertiary hospital.

Patients: A total of 987 consecutive women who had undergone ART during 1996-2007 were invited and altogether 505 women participated in the study.

Interventions: A postal enquiry with a life satisfaction scale.

Main outcome measure: Self-reported life satisfaction in respect to the time since the last ART.

Results: In general, women who achieved a live birth after ART had a significantly higher life satisfaction than those who had unsuccessful ART, especially when compared in the first three years. The difference disappeared in the time period of 6-9 years after ART. The unsuccessfully treated women who had a child by some other means before or after the unsuccessful ART had comparable life satisfaction with successfully treated women even earlier.

Conclusions: Even if unsuccessful ART outcome is associated with subsequent lower level of life satisfaction, it does not seem to threaten the long-term wellbeing.

Show MeSH
The association of time since the last ART with life satisfaction.The score 4–6 indicates satisfaction, 1220 dissatisfaction and the intermediate group (LS 7–11) consisted of those subjects within one standard deviation from the mean.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231034&req=5

pone-0112540-g001: The association of time since the last ART with life satisfaction.The score 4–6 indicates satisfaction, 1220 dissatisfaction and the intermediate group (LS 7–11) consisted of those subjects within one standard deviation from the mean.

Mentions: When the time since last ART was taken into account, the relationship between LS-score and outcome of ART displayed more variation (Table 3 and Fig. 1). If less than three years have gone after the ART, women with unsuccessful ART with or without a biological child had similar LS scores. Both of these groups were statistically significantly more dissatisfied than successfully treated women. However, if 3–6 years had elapsed since the last treatment, only the childless women with unsuccessful ART were still more dissatisfied compared to successfully treated women. If over 6 years has gone after ART, no statistically significant differences in life satisfaction were found between any of these three groups.


Outcome of assisted reproductive technology (ART) and subsequent self-reported life satisfaction.

Kuivasaari-Pirinen P, Koivumaa-Honkanen H, Hippeläinen M, Raatikainen K, Heinonen S - PLoS ONE (2014)

The association of time since the last ART with life satisfaction.The score 4–6 indicates satisfaction, 1220 dissatisfaction and the intermediate group (LS 7–11) consisted of those subjects within one standard deviation from the mean.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4231034&req=5

pone-0112540-g001: The association of time since the last ART with life satisfaction.The score 4–6 indicates satisfaction, 1220 dissatisfaction and the intermediate group (LS 7–11) consisted of those subjects within one standard deviation from the mean.
Mentions: When the time since last ART was taken into account, the relationship between LS-score and outcome of ART displayed more variation (Table 3 and Fig. 1). If less than three years have gone after the ART, women with unsuccessful ART with or without a biological child had similar LS scores. Both of these groups were statistically significantly more dissatisfied than successfully treated women. However, if 3–6 years had elapsed since the last treatment, only the childless women with unsuccessful ART were still more dissatisfied compared to successfully treated women. If over 6 years has gone after ART, no statistically significant differences in life satisfaction were found between any of these three groups.

Bottom Line: In general, women who achieved a live birth after ART had a significantly higher life satisfaction than those who had unsuccessful ART, especially when compared in the first three years.The unsuccessfully treated women who had a child by some other means before or after the unsuccessful ART had comparable life satisfaction with successfully treated women even earlier.Even if unsuccessful ART outcome is associated with subsequent lower level of life satisfaction, it does not seem to threaten the long-term wellbeing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To compare life satisfaction between women with successful or unsuccessful outcome after assisted reproductive treatment (ART) by taking into account the time since the last ART.

Design: Cohort study.

Setting: Tertiary hospital.

Patients: A total of 987 consecutive women who had undergone ART during 1996-2007 were invited and altogether 505 women participated in the study.

Interventions: A postal enquiry with a life satisfaction scale.

Main outcome measure: Self-reported life satisfaction in respect to the time since the last ART.

Results: In general, women who achieved a live birth after ART had a significantly higher life satisfaction than those who had unsuccessful ART, especially when compared in the first three years. The difference disappeared in the time period of 6-9 years after ART. The unsuccessfully treated women who had a child by some other means before or after the unsuccessful ART had comparable life satisfaction with successfully treated women even earlier.

Conclusions: Even if unsuccessful ART outcome is associated with subsequent lower level of life satisfaction, it does not seem to threaten the long-term wellbeing.

Show MeSH